Manitoba dam protesters demand revenue sharing, hydro bill help

First Nations members protesting the Jenpeg hydroelectric power-generating station rally outside Manitoba Hydro's headquarters in downtown Winnipeg on Thursday afternoon. (Marjorie Dowhos/CBC)

First Nations members protesting the Jenpeg hydroelectric power-generating station rally outside Manitoba Hydro’s headquarters in downtown Winnipeg on Thursday afternoon. (Marjorie Dowhos/CBC)

First Nation chief says protesters won’t leave Jenpeg site until demands are met

By Chinta Puxley, The Canadian Press/CBC News, Oct 23, 2014

Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger says he’s willing to consider the demands of protesters from a northern First Nation occupying the grounds of a key power-generating station.

Protesters from Cross Lake First Nation want a revenue-sharing agreement with Manitoba Hydro, as well as a public apology, a shoreline cleanup and help with residential hydro bills which hover around $600 a month in the winter. Read the rest of this entry

Australia: Aboriginal man dies in Casuarina Prison as hundreds rally around WA to protest deaths in custody

Protesters gather at Western Australia parliament in Perth.

Protesters gather at Western Australia parliament in Perth.

by Powell, ABC News, Oct 23, 2014

A 31-year-old Aboriginal man has died in a Perth prison, as hundreds rally around the state to protest Aboriginal deaths in custody.

It is the second death in custody in WA in three months.

Protesters rallied in Perth, South Hedland and Geraldton to demand answers over the death of a 22-year-old Aboriginal woman in police custody in August.

Ms Dhu, 22, died after being locked up in the South Hedland Police Station over unpaid fines. Read the rest of this entry

Attack in Ottawa could increase calls to give CSIS more power

Two apparent snipers from the RCMP Emergency Response Team attempt to enter a building during the Jihadist attack in Ottawa, Oct 22, 2014.

Two snipers from the RCMP Emergency Response Team attempt to enter a building during the shootings in Ottawa that left one soldier dead as well as the shooter on Oct 22, 2014.

By Colin Freeze, The Globe and Mail, Oct. 22 2014

Two deadly attacks perpetrated against Canadian soldiers by suspected extremists are raising the stakes in the domestic fight against terrorism.

In recent months, the public and politicians have pushed federal security officials to get more aggressive. One response has been renewed efforts to block or revoke passports to stop the exodus of extremists to fight with the Islamic State jihadis and related groups.

Yet counterterrorism officials increasingly regard extremists in Canada as more menacing and harder to predict. Security measures are already stretching to their legal limits – yet Parliament is set to confer more powers to federal agents as the threats continue to mount.

“This will lead us to strengthen our resolve and redouble our efforts,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Wednesday evening in a televised address. He said that the violence in Ottawa and near Montreal will lead his government to beef up counter-terrorism efforts. Read the rest of this entry

Former Idle No More organizer unfazed RCMP have him under surveillance

Clayton Thomas Muller, former member of IEN and Idle No More.

Clayton Thomas Muller, former member of IEN and Idle No More.

By Jorge Barrera, APTN National News, Oct 21, 2014
An Indigenous activist says documents showing the RCMP have him under surveillance reveal Canadian authorities have criminalized Indigenous dissent.

Clayton Thomas-Muller, 37, said he wasn’t surprised to learn the RCMP is keeping tabs on him and compiled a file on his movements dating back to at least 2010.

“I try not to pay any attention to the federal surveillance issue,” said Thomas-Muller, who is currently living in Ottawa and is a former Idle No More organizer. “I feel very strongly that the work I do is just and is on the right side of history, so I really don’t pay any attention to the Harper government’s tactics to try to criminalize the work I am involved in which uplifts democracy, transparency, equity and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Specifically, the right of indigenous people to say no to harmful developments that threaten their way of life.” Read the rest of this entry

Kinder Morgan’s Western Canada Pipeline Plans Hit A Mountain Of Opposition

Kinder Morgan Westridge Marine Terminal gate - photo by Mychaylo Prystupa, Vancouver Observer.

Kinder Morgan Westridge Marine Terminal gate – photo by Mychaylo Prystupa, Vancouver Observer.

By Julie Gordon, Huffington Post/Reuters, Oct 21, 2014

VANCOUVER, Oct 21 (Reuters) – A Western Canadian pipeline once seen as the best near-term hope for sending more of the country’s controversial tar sands crude to Asia has hit another snag: aboriginal communities intent on using the courts to block the proposed expansion.

Kinder Morgan Energy Partners’ C$5.4 billion ($4.8 billion) Trans Mountain expansion would twin a 60-year-old line running from the oil-rich province of Alberta to the coastal city of Vancouver, tripling its capacity.

The pipeline expansion had been seen as sure bet because it uses an existing route. But a surge in municipal opposition in recent months has fueled industry worries that it will enter legal and regulatory limbo along with the unbuilt TransCanada Corp Keystone XL and Enbridge Inc Northern Gateway pipelines.

Read the rest of this entry

Oilpatch faces project cancellations with crude at $82

Oil spill in northern Alberta.

Oil spill in northern Alberta.

As earnings season approaches, analysts weigh investment prospects for next year

CBC News, Oct 20, 2014

The falling price of oil will likely result in a round of project cancellations and disappointing results in the Canadian oilpatch, analysts say.

As oil companies bring in third quarter earnings, starting toward the end of this week,  they’re facing oil priced at just above $80, down about 20 per cent since June of this year.

Today West Texas Intermediate oil contracts seem to have stabilized at $82.71 US a barrel, down four cents on the day. That’s up from the lows below $80 set last week. Western Canada Select, the price received by many Canadian oil producers, is at $69.10.

“When the price falls to where it is now, certainly a lot of crude oil producers are having a second look at future projects for expanding the oilsands until they see where things shake out,” says Michael Ervin, of petroleum consultancy M.J. Ervin & Assoc. Read the rest of this entry

Misty Upham’s Father Says Her Death Was an Accident, but Alleges Mistreatment by Police

Misty Upham 1

Native actress Misty Upham, who died on Oct 5, 2014, in Auburn, Washington.

Indian Country Today, Oct 17, 2014

Charles Upham has released a statement regarding the death of his daughter Misty, an actress known for her work in the films Frozen River, Jimmy P., and August: Osage County. The statement addresses many of the questions left unanswered in mainstream coverage of the unfortunate story to date. Here it is, in full:

We would like to provide the following information to all of Misty’s friends and family.

We believe that Misty’s death was accidental. She did not commit suicide. We believe she ran into the wooded area behind her apartment to hide from the police. The area in question has a hidden drop-off and evidence suggests that she slipped and fell off of the steep embankment when she tried to get out of a view from the road. She simply did not see the drop off. We searched near that area that evening she disappeared and missed seeing her purse by 25 feet. I, Charles, went there after Fire Department officials recovered her body and you just can’t see the steep drop until it’s to late.

Read the rest of this entry

Squamish Nation officials removed after financial investigation

Krisandara Jacobs, former communications manager for Squamish band council.

Krisandara Jacobs, former communications manager for Squamish band council.

Cheques issued by Krissy Jacobs and Glen Newman lead to their removal from band positions

CBC News, Oct 20, 2014

Two officials with the Squamish Nation have now been relieved of their duties after an investigation found problems with how nearly $1.5 million was spent from an emergency fund.

The investigation looked into a series of cheques issued over the past six years from funds set up to help First Nation’s members with emergencies such as rent, travel to funerals, or clothing. Read the rest of this entry

Native Warriors claim credit for burning bridge that leads to proposed mine site

The province has confirmed a suspected arson on a bridge across Adams River leading to a proposed underground mine.

A group calling itself Secwepemc Ts’ka7 Warriors posted a statement on an activist website, claiming responsibility for torching the bridge, located about 70 kilometres northeast of Clearwater, near Tumtum Lake on Oliver Creek forest service road.

“With much discussion with Elders Councils and around sacred fires and ceremonies. the Secwepemc Ts’ka7 Warriors have acted out their collective responsibility and jurisdiction to and in the Ts’ka7 area by deactivating the Imperial Metals Ruddock Creek mine road,” reads the statement online at popularresistance.org. Read the rest of this entry

Kinder Morgan questions how much B.C. First Nation still eats fish

Chinook salmon.

Chinook salmon.

NEB hearings underway to hear Aboriginal oral evidence into Kinder Morgan’s proposed oil pipeline, that would cross dozens of rivers sacred to First Nations.

Read the rest of this entry

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