Shale gas protesters sentenced to 15 months for violent clash with RCMP

Aaron Francis (right) and Germain Junior Breau (left).

Aaron Francis (right) and Germain Junior Breau (left).

Germain Junior Breau and Aaron Francis convicted of several charges tied to protest near Rexton, N.B

CBC News July 29, 2014

Two anti-shale gas protesters have been sentenced to 15 months in jail in connection to a violent clash with police near Rexton, N.B., last fall.

Germain Junior Breau, 21, of Upper Rexton, N.B., and Aaron Francis, 20, of Eskasoni, N.S., were sentenced in Moncton provincial court on Tuesday on several charges.

Judge R. Leslie Jackson gave Breau 423 days of credit for the 282 days he has already spent in custody. That means he has about a month left to serve in his sentence. Read the rest of this entry

First Nation chiefs’ salaries due to be posted under Transparency Act

New ChiefMost First Nations have yet to post salaries

By Susana Mas, CBC News, July 29, 2014

The vast majority of First Nations chiefs and band councils have yet to post their financial statements online under new transparency rules passed by the federal government last year.

Under the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, First Nations leaders have 120 days after the first quarter — so, by end of day Tuesday — to make public their audited financial statements for the last fiscal year, including the salaries and expenses of their chiefs and councillors.

As of Monday night, on the eve of the deadline, the government confirmed that 20 First Nations out of more than 600 had their financial statements posted on the government’s web site. Read the rest of this entry

Stoney Nakoda First Nation signs ‘huge’ oil deal with Chinese firm

Chief Ernest Wesley of the Wesley Nation, Chief Bruce Labelle of the Chiniki Nation, the managing director of Huatong Petrochemical Holdings Ltd., Alick Au, and Chief Darcy Dixon of the Bearspaw Nation have signed a joint venture agreement to develop and explore Stoney Nakoda territory for oil and gas. (Terry Munro)

Chief Ernest Wesley of the Wesley Nation, Chief Bruce Labelle of the Chiniki Nation, the managing director of Huatong Petrochemical Holdings Ltd., Alick Au, and Chief Darcy Dixon of the Bearspaw Nation have signed a joint venture agreement to develop and explore Stoney Nakoda territory for oil and gas. (Terry Munro)

Joint venture agreement with Huatong Petrochemical Holdings Ltd. covers development on 49,000 hectares

CBC News July 28, 2014

Alberta’s Stoney Nakoda First Nation says it has signed a “huge” deal with a Chinese petrochemical company to develop oil and gas on its land.

The First Nation is located 60 kilometres west of Calgary and has signed a joint venture agreement with Hong Kong-based Huatong Petrochemical Holdings Ltd. to explore and develop oil and gas deposits on Stoney Nation lands.

About 49,000 hectares of land will be explored and developed through the agreement, with Huatong providing all necessary funding — possibly hundreds of millions of dollars — and Nakoda Oil & Gas Inc. acting as the primary operator for the joint venture.

Read the rest of this entry

Copper broken on Parliament Hill in First Nations shaming ceremony

The copper in Saskatchewan, June 2014, during its cross country journey to Ottawa.

The copper in Saskatchewan, June 2014, during its cross country journey to Ottawa.

Western Canada First Nations representatives want government to address troubled relationship

By Martha Troian, CBC News, Juyl 27, 2014

A traditional shaming ceremony held today on the steps of Parliament Hill is meant to challenge the federal government to renew its troubled relationship with First Nations, says a prominent West Coast artist.

Beau Dick, 59, a master carver and hereditary chief from the Namgis First Nation, says the ceremony involves cutting or breaking a large copper shield.

“Breaking copper is a challenge, it is also a shaming, and it is also about banishment,” Dick explained. Read the rest of this entry

Convicted murderer laughs during court appearance

Traigo Andretti and his wife Jennifer McPherson. Andretti pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and indignity to human remains in the killing and dismemberment of his wife on April 29, 2013, on Hanson Island.

Traigo Andretti and his wife Jennifer McPherson. Andretti pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and indignity to human remains in the killing and dismemberment of his wife on April 29, 2013, on Hanson Island.

Traigo Andretti is already serving a life-sentence for killing and dismembering his wife in B.C.

Read the rest of this entry

Policy changes aimed at reviving B.C. treaty process, gaining support for natural-resource projects: Aboriginal Affairs

Aboriginal Affairs minister Bernard Valcourt.

Aboriginal Affairs minister Bernard Valcourt.

Lawyer Douglas Eyford named Valcourt’s “special representative”

OTTAWA — The Harper government announced Monday sweeping policy changes aimed at reviving the B.C. treaty process and convincing more First Nations they should support major natural-resource initiatives in B.C.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt’s new approach is in response to numerous criticisms over several years that the government has been inflexible in its approach to treaties, and that it has failed to adequately consult First Nations on controversial oilsands pipeline proposals.

Valcourt appointed Vancouver lawyer Douglas Eyford, the author of a critical government-commissioned report published last December, to lead a process to “renew and reform” a comprehensive treaty process that has produced just four deals in more than two decades of talks.

Read the rest of this entry

Help Kanahus revive ancient birthing practices

Kanahus babyKanahus (Secwepemc/Ktunuxa)is a Traditional Birth Keeper and a mother of 4 children each born in a traditional ceremony. She has always aspired to live a traditional life off the land and amongst her people.

Kanahus needs to meet with other traditional midwives at the YonyFest, near Montreal, Mohawk territoy. She needs travel money to get her from Secwepemc territory (Chase BC) to Montreal. Read the rest of this entry

INDIGENOUS WOMEN AND TWO-SPIRITED PEOPLE: OUR WORK IS DECOLONIZATION!

“Be a Good Girl” by Tania Willard
“Be a Good Girl” by Tania Willard

by Chelsea Vowel, Guts Magazine, July 24, 2014

Indigenous women and two-spirited* people are leading a resurgence movement in iyiniwi-ministik, the People’s Island.* They draw on their traditional roles as protectors of the land and water to inform their work in our communities, and root themselves in their specific socio-political orders to counter colonialism and to revitalize language and culture. Rather than being defined as a struggle against patriarchal gender roles and the division of labour, Indigenous women and two-spirited people’s work combats the imposition of colonial barriers. The goal is not to attain gender equality, but rather to restore Indigenous nationhood, which includes gender equality and respect for gender fluidity.

Read the rest of this entry

Unist’ot’en evict survey crew from TransCanada

Published on Jul 24, 2014

On July 22, 2014, the Unist’ot’en camp evicted a TransCanada crew working on the Coastal Gaslink pipeline within their territories in northern BC. If caught tresspassing again, TransCanada’s equipment will be confiscated.

Read the rest of this entry

Inuit begin battle against seismic testing over fears it endangers marine life

Over 300 Inuit protest fracking on Baffin Island, July 2014.

Over 300 Inuit protest fracking on Baffin Island, July 2014.

By Kent Driscoll, APTN National News, July 23, 2014
Clyde River/Kanngiqtugaapik, NunavutMore than 300 people in the small Baffin Island community of Clyde River, Nunavut, took to the streets Wednesday in protest of proposed seismic testing off the eastern shore of Baffin Island.

Seismic testing is where loud sonic guns are fired into the water and the echo helps to determine what resources are available under the seabed, typically oil.

The National Energy Board announced that the proposed testing has been delayed until 2015, but that didn’t limit the enthusiasm or turnout.

There are only 1,000 people who live in Clyde River and nearly one third of them turned up Wednesday afternoon for a march around the community’s Ring Road. Read the rest of this entry

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