Indigenous Nationhood Movement goes online

CBC News, Nov 05, 2013Indigenous Nationhood Movement logo

A new website is calling for Aboriginal nations to move away from the Indian Act and towards autonomy and traditional governments.

Siku Allooloo is part Haitian, part Inuk, and now living in New York. She was part of a group of Native and non-Native people that drafted principles for the Indigenous Nationhood movement that were released this morning.

“To be able to see how far and wide the movement stretches, I find it affirming,” Allooloo says. “When you can see the amount of collective support… and that’s what I hope people get out of this site.”

Allooloo says the website will act as a central platform to house their statement of principles explaining who they are and what they stand for, and be a place for the public to get information about future actions and campaigns.

She says one of the main challenges Indigenous people face is a skewed representation in the public, in government policies and in text books. She hopes this website will help balance that by giving indigenous people more control over how they’re represented and by building solidarity with many people across different regions.

Glen Coulthard is a Weledeh Dene, and an assistant professor in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. He says this movement is something Northerners can learn from and be a part of.

It’s a place where people can re-learn “traditional land-based forms of knowledge,” he says. “And start thinking about alternatives to the dominant economic model in the NWT.”

Coulthard is one of many people who plan to publish articles on the site, on topics like capitalism and Indigenous traditions.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/indigenous-nationhood-movement-goes-online-1.2415233

Indigenous Nationhood Movement

STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES

WHO WE ARE

• We are a movement for land, life, languages, and liberation.
• We are fighting for the survival and independence of Indigenous nations.
• We are an alliance of mutual support and coordinated action that branches out in all Four Directions.
• We are an Indigenous-led movement that includes women, men, and two-spirited people of all ages, colours, and nationalities.

WHAT WE BELIEVE

• We will protect the land, water, and air that provide the basis for all life.
• Indigenous cultures, spiritualities and governments are the foundation for our continuing survival.
• It is our responsibility to take action and to live according to our original teachings and natural laws.
• Colonial laws and systems must be abolished.
• Restitution must be made for the theft of our lands and the failed attempt to exterminate our peoples.

WHAT WE STAND FOR

• Indigenous self-determination and autonomous nationhood.
• Re-empowering traditional governments.
• Defending and protecting the natural environment and all living beings.
• Reclaiming, renaming, and reoccupying Indigenous homelands and sacred spaces.
• Restoring nation-to-nation relations with Settler people and governments.
• Learning and teaching Indigenous languages, traditions, ceremonies and knowledge.
• Eliminating all forms of violence within Indigenous communities, including violence based on gender and sexual orientation.

Campaigns

Reclaim

In this campaign, we focus on actions supporting the reclamation of Indigenous cultural, historical, political and ceremonial practices that have been severed and impacted by colonial conquest including: reclaiming dispossessed lands in our territories; pursuing …

Rename

This campaign acknowledges that Indigenous place names offer a direct connection to our languages, sacred histories, and creation stories, and that the reclamation of these names is vital for the continuation of our cultures and …

Reoccupy

This campaign calls on our people to re-presence ourselves throughout our traditional territories and homelands. We support Indigenous reoccupations of contentious sites facing urbanization, resource extraction and economic development; reoccupation of traditional hunting, fishing, trapping, …

Indigenous Nationhood Movement website:

http://nationsrising.org/

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Posted on November 5, 2013, in Decolonization and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. Hereditary Chief Kahkakew Yawassanay

    Waste of the paper it was written on as we have our own laws, protocols, methodologies through our hereditary governance that existed long before, during and after the Indian goes through devolution….Clanmothers and lifetime chiefs have this knowledge that no breed can create through a collaborative effort…you cannot create what already exists….

    • Greetings Chief: Just one – important – thing: there are no lifetime chiefs. In real life. And real freedom. Life = change. A chief might become a chief for all of his/her life. If the leadership is confirmed by community. Day after day. Absolutism, even under an indigenous veil, is not a/our way.

      • Hereditary Chief Kahkakew Yawassanay

        Sadly you like too many do not know our ways of hereditary governance….lifetime hereditary chiefs are the head chief of a tribe, often from one clan, in my band’s history, the Thunderbird clan and the lifetime I refer to is not mine but the llineage of former, present and future cheifs that carry that title through the selections guided by ancient protocols and kinship laws..other chiefs are known as sub chiefs or headmen and all including the lifetime chief answer to the clanmothers, who depending on the situation number between 7 or 9 when major decisions are made then passed onto the lifetime chief and sub chiefs to ensure they are carried out. In many decisions the lifetime chief has the authority and carries out what is in the best interests of the tribe. This is not absolutism but collective hereditary governance…this has been confirmed by hereditary communities since time immemorial and its legitimacy and inherency are only questioned by those opposed to our ways or those who have assimilated themselves by choice like yourself whose attitudes, beliefs and biases are influences strongly by non Indigenous societies influences to make such assumptions.

      • This is a reply to the chief’s reply “Sadly you like too many do not know our ways”:

        a) “In many decisions the lifetime chief has the authority and carries out what is in the best interests of the tribe.”

        b) “This is not absolutism but collective hereditary governance…this has been confirmed by hereditary communities since time immemorial and its legitimacy and inherency are only questioned by those opposed to our ways or those who have assimilated themselves by choice like yourself whose attitudes, beliefs and biases are influences strongly by non Indigenous societies influences to make such assumptions.”

        Re a): That is the idealistic hypothesis. And EVERY government says so about itself. If that was the only picture of the real thing, I wonder why leaders from Tecumseh to Comandante Marcos came to the conclusion to CHANGE the old leadership ways…

        Re b): You don’t know me chief. It is thus you who makes assumptions judging (categorizing) a person you have never met and additionally generalize all critics in a denigrating manner. Such procedure is neither an alternative (leadership) way to the destructive mono-culture that oppresses Indigenous Peoples and devastates life.

        Plus c): We certainly have better things to do than to engage in such individualistic ping-pong games. Even more so occupying space of a public communication platform. I thus retreat.

  2. Reblogged this on idealisticrebel and commented:
    The first people to love and care about the earth.

  3. Reblogged this on The ObamaCrat™.

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