Category Archives: Oil & Gas

Unist’ot’en evict survey crew from TransCanada

Published on Jul 24, 2014

On July 22, 2014, the Unist’ot’en camp evicted a TransCanada crew working on the Coastal Gaslink pipeline within their territories in northern BC. If caught tresspassing again, TransCanada’s equipment will be confiscated.

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Inuit begin battle against seismic testing over fears it endangers marine life

Over 300 Inuit protest fracking on Baffin Island, July 2014.

Over 300 Inuit protest fracking on Baffin Island, July 2014.

By Kent Driscoll, APTN National News, July 23, 2014
Clyde River/Kanngiqtugaapik, NunavutMore than 300 people in the small Baffin Island community of Clyde River, Nunavut, took to the streets Wednesday in protest of proposed seismic testing off the eastern shore of Baffin Island.

Seismic testing is where loud sonic guns are fired into the water and the echo helps to determine what resources are available under the seabed, typically oil.

The National Energy Board announced that the proposed testing has been delayed until 2015, but that didn’t limit the enthusiasm or turnout.

There are only 1,000 people who live in Clyde River and nearly one third of them turned up Wednesday afternoon for a march around the community’s Ring Road. Read the rest of this entry

Six Nations protesters stop Enbridge Line 9 dig in North Dumfries

Enbridge Line 6 6 NationsCBC News July 17, 2014

Protesters from Six Nations stopped work at a dig on a portion of the Line 9 pipeline in North Dumfries Thursday morning.

According to a statement from protesters, a group marched onto a work site east of Highway 24 near the Grand River between Cambridge and Brantford around 10 a.m. Thursday. They say Enbridge’s employees are working without consent or consultation on land that is on Haudenosaunee territory. Read the rest of this entry

Northern Gateway pipeline: First Nations outline constitutional challenges

"Grand Chief" Stewart Phillips of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.

“Grand Chief” Stewart Phillips of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says at least 9 legal challenges have been launched

By Mike Laanela, CBC News, July 14, 2014

Several B.C. First Nations are launching at least nine court challenges to try to block Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline, leaders revealed at a news conference this morning in Vancouver.

The First Nations leaders said they will argue the proposed pipeline and its recent approval by the federal government is a constitutional violation of their aboriginal land rights in their respective territories, particularly in light of the Supreme Court of Canada victory last month by the Tsilhqot’in First Nation. Read the rest of this entry

Fort MacKay First Nation members short on cash after oilsands profits dip

Tar Sands factory complex in northern Alberta.

Tar Sands factory complex in northern Alberta.

Band CEO blames low profits for missing annual payments

CBC News July 11, 2014

Some residents from the wealthy Fort McKay First Nation are in financial trouble after the band failed to provide an expected dividend from oilsands profits last month.

Band members have long been receiving the payment, known as a PCD, which the band is able to pay out due to profits gained from oilsands-related operations. Recently, members collected more than $10,000 per year from the funds.  Read the rest of this entry

Elsipogtog: No Fracking Way!

Video by Devil Dog Productions, Posted to Youtube July 7, 2014

October 2013 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police descended on a peaceful anti-fracking protest led by the Mi’kmaq of Elsipogtog and their allies. In this film the voices of some of the people involved in the anti-fracking movement talk about what happened and why they took the stand against hydraulic fracturing and how the heavy handed police response has affected their people.

Mi’kmaq Warriors Call For Support

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First Nations’ cancer linked to Tar Sands’ toxins in wild food: study

Tar Sands in northern Alberta, where Native band councils work with industry and benefit from the toxic destruction of their environment.

Tar Sands in northern Alberta, where Native band councils work with industry and benefit from the toxic destruction of their environment.

Deeply frustrated by provincial denials of health concerns, two First Nations commissioned their own study using out-of-province university researchers to examine oil sands pollutants in their foods.

by Mychaylo Prystupa, Vancouver Observer,July 8th, 2014

Two northern Alberta First Nations downstream of massive oil sands smoke plumes and tailing ponds released a human health study Monday, implicating the growth of the industry to many serious Aboriginal health concerns, including cancer.

The worry?  Oil sands pollution is contaminating their wild food. Read the rest of this entry

Kinder Morgan skirting pipeline questions: B.C., Vancouver

Oil tanker passing through Burrard Inlet from Chevron refinery in Burnaby BC, end point for Kinder Morgan's TransMountain pipeline.

Oil tanker passing through Burrard Inlet from Chevron refinery in Burnaby BC, end point for Kinder Morgan’s TransMountain pipeline, which the corporation is seeking to expand.

Trans Mountain says it responded to interveners’ questions within the scope of the regulatory review

CBC News/The Canadian Press July 5, 2014

A chorus of critics that includes the province of British Columbia and the City of Vancouver claim that Kinder Morgan has failed to answer many of the questions put to the company through the regulatory review process for its proposed Trans Mountain pipeline.

The City of Vancouver submitted 394 written questions as part of the National Energy Board’s regulatory review process, covering everything from emergency management plans to compensation in the event of an oil spill, but said the Texas-based company did not respond to 40 per cent of them. Read the rest of this entry

Kinder Morgan’s $136 million pipeline ‘war chest’ to be paid by Canadians

Oil tanker prepares to fill up with Alberta Tar Sands oil at Burrard Inlet refinery.

Oil tanker prepares to fill up with Alberta Tar Sands oil at Burrard Inlet refinery.

“The decision to enable this unfair advantage is unprecedented. The approach has been rejected out of hand by US regulators,” said economist Robyn Allan.

Jenny Uechi, Vancouver Observer,July 1, 2014
In what an economist calls an “unprecedented” decision, the National Energy Board has allowed Kinder Morgan to build up a $136 million ‘war chest’ to fund its Trans Mountain pipeline expansion application through shipping surcharges. The charge, called a “firm service fee”,  allows Texas-based pipeline company Kinder Morgan to offload the cost of the pipeline application to Canadians.
“The decision to enable this unfair advantage is unprecedented. The approach has been rejected out of hand by US regulators,” said Robyn Allan, an independent economist and former CEO of ICBC, who outlined the finding in her report. 

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