Muzzle Blast Round Injures woman at Quebec City anti-austerity protests

Quebec City Police fire what appears to be a Muzzle Blast round into a group of protesters outside the legislative assembly in Quebec City, March 26, 2015.

Quebec City Police fire what appears to be a Muzzle Blast round into a group of protesters outside the legislative assembly in Quebec City, March 26, 2015.

A young woman, Naomi Tremblay-Trudeau, was injured by a tear gas round fired at almost point blank range during anti-austerity protests in Quebec City on March 26, 2015.  Naomi suffered a blunt trauma injury to her lower lip, which caused bruising and swelling.

Many people across the country are outraged that Quebec City riot cops fired the round at such extreme range, with some confusing the type of round fired as being a tear gas canister.  While the headlines of the protester being shot with a tear gas round are technically correct, the round was most likely not an actual canister. Read the rest of this entry

Sudden resignation of Shawn Atleo cost AFN more than just its leader

Former AFN 'grand chief' Shawn Atleo with his political master, PM Stephen Harper, looking on.

Former AFN ‘grand chief’ Shawn Atleo with his political master, PM Stephen Harper, looking on.

By Steve Rennie, The Canadian Press/APTN National News, March 27, 2015

OTTAWA – Shawn Atleo’s abrupt resignation as national chief cost the Assembly of First Nations more than just its leader.

New documents show the federal government turned down the assembly’s request for an extra $324,000 to cover the unforeseen expenses that arose when Atleo quit his job last May.

Atleo stepped down amid fears that he’d become what he himself called a “lightning rod” for controversy as a result of having backed the Conservative government’s proposed reforms to First Nations education. Read the rest of this entry

PDF: Where There is No Doctor

Where there is no doctor cover 1A PDF of the 2011 version of Where There Is No Doctor 2011 (click the link to download).  This manual is 503 pages.  A hard copy version can also ordered from the publisher.

From the introduction:

This handbook has been written primarily for those who live far from medical centers, in places where there is no doctor.  But even where there are doctors, people can and should take the lead in their own health care. So this book is for everyone who cares. It has been written in the belief that: Read the rest of this entry

B.C. treaty process in limbo after province pulls chief commissioner

B.C.’s Heiltsuk Nation mobilizes boats to protect herring fishery

Heiltsuk woman Carrie Humchitt watches powerlessly as a commercial fishing boat takes in tonnes of herring fish in a disputed fishing area on the B.C. central coast near Bella Bella on Sunday. Photo by Ian McAllister, Vancouver Observer.

Heiltsuk woman Carrie Humchitt watches powerlessly as a commercial fishing boat takes in tonnes of herring fish in a disputed fishing area on the B.C. central coast near Bella Bella on Sunday. Photo by Ian McAllister, Vancouver Observer.

THE CANADIAN PRESS March 26, 2015

BELLA BELLA – The Heiltsuk Nation is vowing to protect herring in its territory by any means necessary as it readies boats to defend a contentious fishery on B.C.’s Central Coast.

The First Nation has issued a news release saying it met with federal officials about a commercial herring gillnet fishery in its territory Wednesday afternoon but failed to reach an agreement.

Read the rest of this entry

Okanagan Indian Band taking legal action over rail-trail land

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Oilsands producers face harsh reality of rout: There’s no one to save them this time

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Jeremy van Loon and Rebecca Penty, Bloomberg News/Financial Post, March 23, 2015

The collapse in the market for Canada’s heavy crude below $30 a barrel last week is hammering home a harsh reality for the nation’s oil-sands producers: There’s no one to save them this time.

Unlike previous market crashes that were relatively short- lived, the combination of persistent oversupplies and weakening demand are dealing a severe setback to what’s been one of the biggest growth stories in global energy markets. Oilsands companies such as Suncor Energy Inc. already have been rethinking major developments that can require more than $10 billion in investment. Now even existing projects are barely covering costs or in a losing position. Read the rest of this entry

Bill C-51 hearings: First Nations could be targeted, Pam Palmater says

Indigenous right activist Pam Palmater and Toronto Police inspector Steve Irwin appear before the House public safety committee, which is currently reviewing the government's proposed anti-terror legislation. (CBC)

Indigenous right activist Pam Palmater and Toronto Police inspector Steve Irwin appear before the House public safety committee, which is currently reviewing the government’s proposed anti-terror legislation. (CBC)

Bill ‘less about Jihadists under every bed… more about increasing the output of tarsands': Stewart Phillip

By Kady O’Malley, CBC News, March 24, 2015

First Nations activists may find themselves targets of the Conservatives’ proposed anti-terror law, which could “criminalize [their] private thoughts,” Mi’kmaq lawyer Pam Palmater warned the House public safety committee on Tuesday.

She called on the government to withdraw its proposed anti-terror legislation entirely.

Palmater, who currently holds a chair in indigenous governance at Ryerson University, began her testimony by acknowledging that the committee was meeting on traditional Algonquin territory — a fact that, she said, addresses the issue at the heart of the flaws in the bill, as it depends on the continued co-operation between First Nations and Canadian governments. Read the rest of this entry

Masked protesters allegedly steal Kinder Morgan equipment on Burnaby Mountain

A Kinder Morgan vehicle with its windows smashed, Burnaby Mountain, March 23, 2015. Photo: Metro News.

A Kinder Morgan vehicle with its windows smashed, Burnaby Mountain, March 23, 2015. Photo: Metro News.

By Emily Jackson, Metro Vancouver, March 23, 2015

The battle between protesters and Kinder Morgan flared up on Monday after masked men allegedly broke into a vehicle on Burnaby Mountain to steal surveying equipment.

“I understand that a window was smashed on one of the contractors vehicles and some surveying equipment was taken by a masked man who we believe has previously interfered with the survey work we’ve been undertaking,” Trans Mountain Pipeline spokeswoman Lizette Parsons Bell said. Read the rest of this entry

Heiltsuk First Nation says commercial herring fishery violated constitutional rights

A fishing boat pulls in a net full of herring on the Central Coast of B.C. (Heiltsuk First Nation)

A fishing boat pulls in a net full of herring on the Central Coast of B.C. (Heiltsuk First Nation)

Heiltsuk claim Fisheries and Ocean Canada’s method of measuring herring stocks is flawed

CBC News, March 23, 2015

The Heiltsuk First Nation on B.C.’s Central Coast says when Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) opened a herring fishery on Sunday afternoon it violated the band’s constitutional rights.

According to a statement released by the Heiltsuk, just before 5 p.m. PT, the federal department opened the herring sac roe seine fishery in Spiller Channel, despite the First Nation’s demands the commercial fishery remain closed this year to preserve herring stocks. Read the rest of this entry

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