Toxic ‘red tide’ in Chile prompts investigation of salmon farms

Chile red tide sardines

Dead sardines washed up on a beach in Chile, May 2016.

Algal bloom ‘of biblical proportions’ has led to protests and health emergency as concerns raised over dumping of rotting salmon in ocean

by Jonathan Franklin, The Guardian, May 17, 2016

Chilean authorities are investigating the country’s salmon-farming industry after an algal bloom carrying a virulent neurotoxin spread for hundreds of miles along the rugged coastline of Patagonia, triggering a health emergency and angry protests by fishermen.

The huge “red tide” has grown rapidly over recent weeks, in what has been described as the country’s worst environmental crisis in recent years: dozens of people have been poisoned by the algal bloom which makes seafood toxic and has deprived thousands of fishermen of a living.

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Demonstrators continue to occupy Williams Lake Indian Band office

 

Williams Lake band office occupation

Secwepemc women and youth join the occupation of the Williams Lake Indian Band Office, May 25, 2016. Photo: Facebook.

by  Angie Mindus, Williams Lake Tribune, May 25, 2016

Occupation of the administration office at the Williams Lake Indian Band entered day two Wednesday with no quick resolution in sight.

Six men entered the office just after 8 a.m. Tuesday after they forced their way in and asked staff to leave as women staffers were opening the building for the day.

What followed next was an initially swift response from heavily armed members of the RCMP, who secured the perimeter around the building and communicated with the protestors and also with band councillors gathered at the community’s resource building across the street. Read the rest of this entry

Community members occupy Williams Lake band office: RCMP on scene

Williams Lake band office occupation

 

At least four members of the Williams Lake Indian Band have forced their way into the band administration office Tuesday morning and asked staff to leave.— image credit: Angie Mindus photo

by  Angie Mindus, Williams Lake Tribune, May 24, 2016 at 10:00 AM

RCMP are on scene at the Williams Lake Indian Band administration office where at least four men forcibly entered the building just after 8 a.m. Tuesday morning and asked staff to leave.

It is unclear at this early stage what the group wants, however it is suspected their motive is political. Text messages from the group relayed to the Tribune indicate the men are unarmed, however that has not been confirmed.

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Geological survey expands in western B.C.

Geological survey helicopter

Helicopter equipped with magnetometer maps underground regions of magnetic minerals, gas and water.— image credit: Geoscience BC

by  Tom Fletcher , The Northern view, May 24, 2016

The latest geophysical survey of B.C. will map the largest area so far, creating a three-dimensional image indicating mineral and water resources far underground.

Geoscience BC has received $5 million from the provincial government for the Search II project, to complete an aerial magnetic survey of a 24,000 between Fort Fraser and Smithers, north of Tweedsmuir Provincial Park.

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Dakota Access Pipeline Construction Begins Despite Standing Rock Sioux Objections

Dakota Access pipeline rally

Lakota rally against Dakota Access pipeline, April 2016.

Chelsey Luger, Indian Country Today, May 23, 2016

In the midst of an ongoing effort by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other entities to prevent construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the company Dakota Access LLC has begun construction of the 1,150-mile project, which will carry crude oil from western North Dakota to Illinois.

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Mapuche Resistance Group, Weichan Auka Mapu, Claims more than 30 Sabotage Attacks

Arviat, Nunavut Young Adults Are Learning To Grow Their Own Produce

o-ARVIAT-GREENHOUSE-570by Emma Prestwich, Huffington Post, May 19, 2016

Vegetables aren’t hugely popular in the northern community of Arviat.

The hamlet of just over 2,000 people on the shores of Hudson Bay has two grocery stores, and fresh food, which has to be flown in from southern Canada, is pricey.

Many vegetables, like lettuce, also don’t keep for very long, and community educator Shirley Tagalik says this makes them even less appealing.

“If you buy something and it’s wilted and goes bad the next day, [you] don’t want to waste your money,” Tagalik tells The Huffington Post Canada. Read the rest of this entry

First Nations say they have the power to stop Trans Mountain expansion

kinder-morganFirst Nations say the courts, not the NEB or cabinet, will decide on the controversial pipeline

By Tracy Johnson, CBC News, May 20, 2016

The Stó:lō collective of First Nations in British Columbia is very familiar with the transport of oil. The existing Trans Mountain pipeline has crossed through their land for more than 50 years. CN Rail also carries oil by rail directly across Stó:lō territory to the B.C. coast.

So, the collective of eleven First Nations in B.C.’s Fraser Valley came to consultations with Kinder Morgan for the expansion of Trans Mountain with an open mind.

“We have taken time to speak to Kinder Morgan,” said Ernie Crey, the chief of the Cheam First Nation, a member of the collective. Read the rest of this entry

Family evicted from home at Williams Lake Indian Band

 

Williams Lake band eviction

RCMP officers physically remove Williams Lake Indian Band member Sheldon Wycotte from the home of his deceased’s grandfather at Sugar Cane Wednesday while a witness records the arrest. Photo: Williams Lake Tribune

by  Monica Lamb-Yorski, Williams Lake Tribune, May 19, 2016

A 29-year-old First Nations man said he doesn’t know where to turn after leaders from the Williams Lake Indian Band had police forcibly remove him from his family home and community Wednesday.

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Nunavut jail’s carving program helps inmates handle stress, build life skills

iqaluit-inmate-carvings

Photo: Jane Sponagle/CBC

‘When I’m carving … I wish I was out there out on the land or on the floe edge’

By Jane Sponagle, CBC News, May 19, 2016

A glass and metal display case gleams under fluorescent lights. Pale and dark greens swirl through the owl, inukshuk and polar bear soapstone carvings that line the shelves.

On this Friday afternoon, shoppers are huddled around the case, inspecting the carvings. Sales seem brisk.

But this isn’t a Toronto art gallery or even an Iqaluit souvenir shop. This is the lobby of Makigiarvik, Iqaluit’s new minimum security jail. Read the rest of this entry

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