Abbotsford police recommend assault charge against RCMP officer after girl, 17, beaten

By Andy Ivens, The Province, March 7, 2012

Injuries inflicted on Jamie Haller by RCMP officer in Williams Lake, Sept 10, 2011

An assault charge has been recommended by police investigating a Williams Lake RCMP officer who allegedly punched a teenage girl repeatedly while she was handcuffed in the back of a police cruiser last year.
Jamie Haller, 17, was running in fear from a Williams Lake street gang on the night of Sept. 10 and asked a passerby to call 911.
Jamie managed to call her mother, Martina Jeff, who jumped into her car and went looking for Jamie — who had never been in trouble with the law before.
Jeff said that when she found her, Jamie was on the ground in handcuffs and in the midst of a panic attack, surrounded by police officers.
Jeff said she saw the police handle Jamie roughly as they put her in the back of a cruiser, where she began kicking the window.
Jeff said she heard Const. Andy Yung threaten Jamie if she didn’t stop kicking the window.
He then joined Jamie in the back, where, Jeff said, she saw Yung repeatedly punch her daughter in the face.
This is not the first time Const. Yung has been accused of bad behaviour.
According to newspaper reports, Yung was disciplined by RCMP for an incident in which he was assigned to security detail at a conference of defence ministers in Banff in September 2008.
He was off-duty on the night of Sept. 5, when he got drunk and called his ex-girlfriend from his hotel room. The call left him in tears.
Yung then fired a shot from his service pistol into the ceiling of his room at the Banff Springs Hotel. He called 911 and said he had accidentally fired his handgun.
The Ottawa Citizen reported that Yung had illegally used the national police database to keep tabs on his ex-girlfriend.
At his disciplinary hearing later that year, Yung received a reprimand for disgraceful conduct and was docked five days’ pay. In subsequent criminal proceedings, Yung was given an absolute discharge.
Jeff said she’s surprised Yung is still working as a police officer.
“It crosses my mind, why is he still on duty,” Jeff told The Province on Wednesday.
Jeff, a single mom raising four teenagers, said Jamie “has been struggling” since the alleged incident in the police car.
Jamie gave up her job at the local Dairy Queen and hasn’t worked or been back to school since the assault, said Jeff.
“Her face swelled up” as a result of the attack in the back of the cruiser.
“She had braces and there was damage inside her mouth where the braces were,” said Jeff.
Jeff said Insp. Warren Brown, commanding officer of the Williams Lake RCMP detachment, called her to reassure her the police will be there to help her if she needs it.
“I am disappointed to learn that a charge of assault is recommended against one of my constables,” Brown said in a prepared statement.
Because Yung has not yet been charged, the RCMP followed its normal policy of not releasing his name. He has been placed on “non-operational duties,” said the release.
David Eby, executive director of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said he was encouraged by the recommendation to lay charges against Yung.
“It’s heartening for anyone who believes that police officers shouldn’t be able to punch teenage girls while they’re handcuffed,” he said.
“I’m hopeful the RCMP will examine the conduct of this officer in light of this incident and his history, and evaluate whether he should be . . . wearing an RCMP uniform.”
aivens@theprovince.com

Sept. 30, 2011: First Nations groups calling for independent probe into incident

The Province, Sept. 30, 2011

Four aboriginal groups are calling on the public safety minister to appoint an independent investigator into the alleged assault of a girl by RCMP officers in Williams Lake.
The First Nations Summit, the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, the B.C. Assembly of First Nations and the Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of B.C. say the probe into 17-year-old Jamie Haller’s complaint shouldn’t be handled by police.
Jamie said she was repeatedly punched in the face by an RCMP officer Sept. 10 while handcuffed in the back of a police cruiser.
A senior RCMP officer was initially appointed to investigate the incident, but the Abbotsford Police Department took over Thursday. Abbotsford police will consider more than just the allegations of assault from both police and the girl, said spokesman Const. Ian MacDonald.
“In this case, we’re looking at the whole ball of wax,” MacDonald said. “We’re looking at everything that transpired in relation to the events of Sept. 10.”
NCCABC president Hugh Baker said the ad hoc coalition of aboriginal groups oppose police investigating police.
“It’s another example of what we think is a very bad situation with regards to the police treatment of aboriginal people in the central Interior,” Baker said.
http://www.theprovince.com/news/Sept+2011+First+Nations+groups+calling+independent+probe+into+incident/6265651/story.html

Update

Crown approves assault charge against Williams Lake Mountie‏

Constable allegedly punched girl, 17, repeatedly in back of police cruiser

By Andy Ivens, The Province, March 9, 2012

An assault charge has been approved by Crown counsel against a Williams Lake Mountie who allegedly punched a teenage girl repeatedly last year while she was handcuffed in the back of a police cruiser.
Yung is scheduled to appear in provincial court at a later date.
Jamie Haller, 17, was running in fear from a Williams Lake street gang on the night of Sept. 10 and asked a passerby to call 911.
Jamie managed to call her mother, Martina Jeff, who jumped into her car and went looking for Jamie — who had never been in trouble with the law before.
Jeff said that when she found her, Jamie was on the ground in handcuffs and in the midst of a panic attack, surrounded by police officers.
Jeff said she saw the police handle Jamie roughly as they put her in the back of a cruiser, where she began kicking the window.
Jeff said she heard Const. Andy Yung threaten Jamie if she didn’t stop kicking the window.
Yung then joined Jamie in the back, where, Jeff said, she saw him repeatedly punch her daughter in the face.
This isn’t the first time Yung has been accused of bad behaviour.
According to newspaper reports, Yung was disciplined by RCMP for an incident in which he was assigned to a security detail at a conference of defence ministers in Banff in September 2008.
He was off-duty on the night of Sept. 5 when he got drunk and called his former girlfriend from his hotel room. The call left him in tears.
Yung then fired a shot from his service pistol into the ceiling of his room at the Banff Springs Hotel. He called 911 and said he had accidentally fired his handgun.
The Ottawa Citizen reported that Yung had illegally used the national police database to keep tabs on his ex-girlfriend.
At his disciplinary hearing later that year, Yung received a reprimand for disgraceful conduct and was docked five days’ pay. In subsequent criminal proceedings Yung was given an absolute discharge.
Jeff said she’s surprised Yung is still working as a police officer.
“It crosses my mind, why is he still on duty,” Jeff told The Province on Wednesday.
Jeff, a single mom raising four teen-agers, said Jamie “has been struggling” since the alleged incident in the police car.
Jamie gave up her job at the local Dairy Queen and hasn’t worked or been back to school since the assault, said Jeff.
“Her face swelled up” as a result of the attack in the back of the cruiser.
“She had braces and there was damage inside her mouth where the braces were,” said Jeff.
Jeff said Insp. Warren Brown, commanding officer of the Williams Lake RCMP detachment, called her to reassure her that the police will be there to help her if she needs it.
“I am disappointed to learn that a charge of assault is recommended against one of my constables,” Brown said in a prepared statement.
Because Yung hadn’t yet been charged, the RCMP followed its normal policy of not releasing his name. He has been placed on “non-operational duties,” said the release.
David Eby, executive director of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said he was encouraged by the recommendation to lay charges against Yung.
“It’s heartening for anyone who believes that police officers shouldn’t be able to punch teenage girls while they’re handcuffed,” he said.
“I’m hopeful the RCMP will examine the conduct of this officer in light of this incident and his history, and evaluate whether he should be . . . wearing an RCMP uniform.”
aivens@theprovince.com
twitter.com/andivens

http://www.theprovince.com/news/Crown+approves+assault+charge+against+Williams+Lake+Mountie/6269505/story.html

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Posted on March 8, 2012, in RCMP-Police and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. There is absolutely no justification, there can be no justification for beating a 17 year old girl who is handcuffed in the back of a patrol car. It doesn’t matter if she is kicking and screaming hysterically. There is no excuse for the officer’s behaviour. These cops should be charged with assault and battery and removed from public service.

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