North Dakota pipeline activists say arrested protesters were kept in dog kennels

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Demonstrators stand next to burning tires as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers assemble nearby. (Mike McCleary / Bismarck Tribune)

by Sandy Tolan, Los Angeles Times, October 30, 2016

After a night of chaotic clashes with police on the front lines in a months-long protest, Native American activists complained about the force wielded to drive protesters from the path of a pipeline they contend will desecrate tribal lands and put their lone source of drinking water at risk.

Protesters said that those arrested in the confrontation had numbers written on their arms and were housed in what appeared to be dog kennels, without bedding or furniture. Others said advancing officers sprayed mace and pelted them with rubber bullets.

“It goes back to concentration camp days,” said Mekasi Camp-Horinek, a protest coordinator who said authorities wrote a number on his arm when he was housed in one of the mesh enclosures with his mother, Casey.

At least 141 people were arrested Thursday after hundreds of police officers in riot gear, flanked by military vehicles releasing high-pitched “sound cannon” blasts, moved slowly forward, firing clouds of pepper spray at activists who refused to move.

Authorities claimed some protesters turned violent during the confrontation, setting fires, tossing Molotov cocktails and, in one instance, pulling out a gun and firing on officers.

Some of the activists claimed Friday that police had opened fire with rubber bullets on protesters and horses. One horse was euthanized after being shot in the leg, said Robby Romero, a Native American activist.

“They were shooting their rubber bullets at our horses,” he said. “We had to put one horse down,” he said.

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The burned-out husks of heavy trucks sit on Highway 1806 near Cannon Ball, N.D. (James MacPherson / AP)

Camp-Horinek said authorities entered the teepees that activists had erected in the path of the pipeline, a four-state, 1,200-mile conduit to carry oil from western North Dakota to Illinois.

“It looked like a scene from the 1800s, with the cavalry coming up to the doors of the teepees, and flipping open the canvas doors with automatic weapons,” he said.

Standing Rock Tribal Chairman David Archambault II called for a Justice Department investigation into the police tactics. Amnesty International announced Friday it was sending a human rights delegation to investigate and Sen. Bernie Sanders asked the White House to order the Army Corps of Engineers to temporarily halt construction of the pipeline.

“DOJ can no longer ignore our requests,” Archambault said in a statement. “If harm comes to any who come here to stand in solidarity with us, it is on their watch.”

Authorities have said all along that they have used restraint in the ongoing dispute and had pleaded for activists to retreat from the path of the pipeline and return to the camp where they have been gathered for months.

Most of those arrested were expected to be charged with criminal trespassing, engaging in a riot and conspiracy to endanger by fire, according to the sheriff’s department. Several fires broke out during the confrontation, and sheriff’s officials said seven protesters used “sleeping dragon” devices to attach themselves to vehicles or other heavy objects. The maneuver typically involves protesters handcuffing themselves together through PVC pipe, making it difficult for authorities to remove them using bolt cutters to break the handcuffs.

The protest in the rugged lands along the Cannonball River has lasted months as activists — sometimes hundreds, sometimes thousands — have assembled to decry the pipeline project.

But on Friday, with protesters cleared from the path of the pipeline, work was expected to resume on the $3.78-billion Dakota Access Pipeline, operated by the Fortune 500 company Energy Transfer Partners.

“When I left the bus in handcuffs, DAPL [Dakota Access Pipeline] trucks were lined up down the highway with construction equipment and materials waiting to come in and begin work,” said Camp-Horinek.

State and county police, the North Dakota National Guard and an oil company private security team cleared protesters, along with the teepees and tents they had erect in the path of the pipeline, and on Friday, authorities removed the final roadblocks that protesters had erected along the highway.

For the most part, protesters remained peaceful during Thursday’s confrontation, though at one point, an activist set fire to a heap of tires that were part of a blockade set up to impede the progress of advancing officers.

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-north-dakota-pipeline-20161028-story.html

Posted on October 30, 2016, in Oil & Gas, State Security Forces and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. No on wants to believe me when I say that they can’t change. It is in their nature to be a brutal savage people. They keep slaughtering, we keep waiting for them to culturally evolve. They brutally rape, torture and kill our children… and we wait. They rape and murder our sisters… and we wait. Their police shoot and kill us at twice the rate of American blacks… and we wait. The Pequot, the Mohican, the Beothuk, and many others have vanished under the oppression of these European barbarians. “Will we let ourselves be destroyed in our turn without a struggle, give up our homes, our country bequeathed to us by the Great Spirit, the graves of our dead and everything that is dear and sacred to us? Never! Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.” Chief Tecumseh, Shawnee

  2. Reblogged this on Dolphin and commented:
    Dog Kennels, really? This shows the contempt the sheriff has for folks and freedom of speech, religion, and assembly. And it speaks more of the dept.’s character than the water protectors. As a side note ~ I personally don’t agree with setting the tires on fire because it is harmful to the environment. And the horse being put down because of the violence of the police saddens me greatly. I loved watching the horses and ponies in camp. It uplifted the spirit to see them running free, at full gallop.

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