Category Archives: Defending Territory

Mexican Army Attacks Against Indigenous Communities of Ostula

Photo: Semeí Verdía via Quadratin archives

Photo: Semeí Verdía via Quadratin archives

by Revolution News, July 20, 2015

The indigenous communities of Santa Maria Ostula have denounced 3 separate attacks by the Mexican army that occurred yesterday in the municipality of Aquila, Michoacán state. The attacks resulted in the death of one child, 3 others injured (2 minors) along with arrests of several members of the indigenous community and the leader of the Aquila autodefensas group, Semeí Verdía, who was the target of the Army operation.

The events began Sunday [July 19, 2015] morning around 10 AM when the Mexican Army conducted an operation to arrest the leader of local autodefensas group, Semeí Verdía, in the village of La Placita. The Army appeared at the same time at El Duin and Xayakalan, sites where the community police forces maintain checkpoints. Read the rest of this entry

Behind the lines: Invisible scars left by Oka Crisis 25 years later

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. The Canadian Press/Ryan Remiorz

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. The Canadian Press/Ryan Remiorz

Mohawk journalist Dan David reflects on his time during Oka Summer

By Dan David, CBC News, July 11, 2015

At 5 a.m. on the morning of July 11, I’ll be with traditional people and a few guests in The Pines on Kanehsatà:ke Mohawk Territory. There won’t be any government people, politicians, or members of the band council.

No long speeches, preening egos, or empty promises allowed. Just a few people who wish to reflect on the meanings of events that began on a day exactly 25 years before. Read the rest of this entry

Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance

by National Film Board of Canada, uploaded to Youtube on Sept 20, 2011
Directed by Alanis Obomsawin – 1993

On a July 11, 1990, a confrontation propelled Native issues in Kanehsatake and the village of Oka, Quebec, into the international spotlight. Director Alanis Obomsawin spent 78 nerve-wracking days and nights filming the armed stand-off between the Mohawks, the Quebec police and the Canadian army. This powerful documentary takes you right into the action of an age-old Aboriginal struggle. The result is a portrait of the people behind the barricades.

Read the rest of this entry

The Oka Crisis in five minutes

by Submedia TV

The so called “Oka Crisis” is one of the most legendary battles between indigenous land defenders and settles in the last century. This uprising against colonization set the tone for native resistance in Turtle Island to this day. We as subMedia.tv like to big up the Mohawks of Kanehsatà:ke whenever possible, and in honor of the 25th anniversary of this rupture, we bring you two videos from our vault. Read the rest of this entry

Revisiting the Pines: Oka’s legacy

Warriors at Oka, 1990; the 78-day armed standoff at Kanesatake, Mohawk territory, continues to haunt government and corporations in their dealings with Indigenous peoples.

Warriors at Oka, 1990; the 78-day armed standoff at Kanesatake, Mohawk territory, continues to haunt government and corporations in their dealings with Indigenous peoples.

by Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette, July 10, 2015

KANESATAKE — Behind the barricade at the entrance to the Pines, Denise David tossed and turned, dreaming of a deadly melée between unknown foes.

Her nightmare was about to come true.

It was the morning of July 11, 1990, a day that would rudely awaken Canadians to the anger simmering in First Nations communities. Read the rest of this entry

“Oka Crisis” 25 Year Anniversary Poster PDF

Oka 1990 Anniversary Poster 1To mark the 25 year anniversary of the 1990 “Oka Crisis” Warrior Publications has released this 11X17 inch colour poster by Kwakwaka’wakw artist Gord Hill.  You can download this PDF and print it out on a colour laser printer.  Help keep the history of Indigenous resistance alive!  To download click Oka 1990 Anniversary Poster 1. Read the rest of this entry

Still warriors: Kahnawake Mohawks are ready to take up arms to defend their beliefs

Sign at entrance to Kahnawake.

Sign at entrance to Kahnawake.

by Graeme Hamilton, National Post, July 9, 2015

KAHNAWAKE, QUE. —  Early on July 11, 1990, when Bryan Deer’s radio crackled with news the Sûreté du Québec was moving in on Kanesatake with tear gas and concussion grenades, he and his fellow Mohawk Warriors in Kahnawake knew what had to be done.

Within an hour, they had seized the Mercier Bridge, preventing rush-hour traffic from crossing the vital link between their reserve on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River and Montreal. Read the rest of this entry

Oka Crisis deepened understanding of land claims in Canada

Warriors keep watch and read the funnies at Kanesatake, 1990.

Warriors keep watch and read the funnies at Kanesatake, 1990.

25th anniversary dredges up difficult memories for those involved

By Giuseppe Valiante and Peter Rakobowchuk, The Canadian Press/CBC News, July 7, 2015

It was a crisis that grabbed international headlines, with Mohawks and Canadian soldiers involved in a lengthy stand-off that often appeared on the verge of exploding into full-blown combat.

Twenty-five years on, the legacy of the Oka Crisis for many of those who experienced the tension west of Montreal is a greater awareness of indigenous issues. Read the rest of this entry

Twenty-five years later: Oka Crisis events inspired native movements around the world

Long Shadow of the Pines: 25 Years Since the 1990 Oka Crisis

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Bs9TUrskInM“>

My name is Clifton Arihwakehte Nicholas, I am a Kanienkehaka (Mohawk) from Kanehsatake (Oka).  I was a young man involved in the 1990 Oka Crisis from it’s start and throughout that summer.  The Crisis was a critical point both in my life and in the community of Kanehsatake.  It’s impact is still being felt in Kanehsatake and moreover throughout Indigenous communities and movements in Canada from coast to coast.  An examination and retrospection of those events needs to be told by those intimately involved in that historic summer.  Furthermore a wider perspective as to the impact the crisis had on Indigenous people, movements and the government responses to them in light of the events of 1990 from Idle No More to Elsipogtog. Read the rest of this entry

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