Category Archives: Oil & Gas

Kitselas First Nation signs agreement with TransCanada for gas pipeline

Fracking and earthquakes: Exploring the connection

A fracking drill in BC’s Horn River Basin (Two Island Films).

A fracking drill in BC’s Horn River Basin (Two Island Films).

B.C. commission draws link between fracking and 231 seismic events in province

By Terry Reith, Briar Stewart, CBC News, April 17, 2015

May Mickelow had just settled into her shift as night auditor at the Foxwood Inn in Fox Creek, Alta., when she felt the rumble.

“You didn’t hear anything, but you could feel the earth move underneath your feet quite strongly, actually,” said Mickelow. “I felt dizzy, as if I was suddenly on uneven footing.”

Some hotel guests descended to the main floor, asking Mickelow if she had felt the shaking. She had been through earthquakes before, but not here. Read the rest of this entry

Barricades not out of the question to fight pipeline: Mohawk leader

Warrior and Canadian soldier face off during the Oka Crisis of 1990.

Warrior and Canadian soldier face off during the Oka Crisis of 1990.

Anne Caroline Desplanques, QMI Agency, April 11, 2015

MONTREAL — Twenty-eight years after the Kanesatake Mohawk First Nation squared off against police during the Oka Crisis, the community’s grand chief has not ruled out barricades to prevent TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline from being built in its territory.

“It’s possible because it’s been helpful in the past,” said Serge Simon. “At the moment, this isn’t our strategy, but it could happen.”

According to the planned route, the pipeline will pass through the northern part of Kanesatake in Quebec.

Read the rest of this entry

Langley marchers decry pipeline expansion through B.C.

Fort Langley protest 1The march ended with speeches in Fort Langley.

 by Matthew Claxton, Langley Advance, April 11, 2015

Several hundred people marched through Fort Langley Saturday to oppose the expansion of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline that runs through Langley.

Organized by groups including the Pipe Up Network and the Kwantlen First Nation, the march headed from the Kwantlen reserve to the Fort Langley Community Hall.

The march paused in the center of the Jacob Haldi Bridge that connects MacMillan Island to the village of Fort Langley. Above the Fraser River, Kwantlen members drummed and sang before the march continued.

Read the rest of this entry

Fuel spill fouls Vancouver’s English Bay and area beaches

Oil leaks from a freighter in English Bay, Vancouver, BC, April 9, 2015.

Oil leaks from a freighter in English Bay, Vancouver, BC, April 9, 2015.

Michael Shulman, CTV News, April 9, 2015

A one-kilometre-long oil slick believed to have leaked from a bulk carrier ship is fouling the waters and beaches of Vancouver’s scenic English Bay.

It is still not clear what type of type of oil has spilled into the bay, which is surrounded by the city’s downtown, the world renowned Stanley Park and numerous popular beaches.

But so far, an estimated 3,000 litres is believed to have seeped from a freighter named Marathassa. The spill was first spotted at 5 p.m. on Wednesday by a local boater. Read the rest of this entry

TransCanada delays Energy East, won’t build Quebec oil terminal

Clyde River, Nunavut, takes on oil industry over seismic testing

Jerry Natanine, the mayor of Clyde River, Nunavut, says seismic testing for oil deposits in nearby waters could kill marine mammals. (David Michael Lamb/CBC)

Jerry Natanine, the mayor of Clyde River, Nunavut, says seismic testing for oil deposits in nearby waters could kill marine mammals. (David Michael Lamb/CBC)

Clyde River mayor taking seismic testing companies to court in April

By David Michael Lamb, CBC News, March 30, 2015

Clyde River can without exaggeration be called one of the most remote and inaccessible human settlements on earth.

The only way into this Nunavut hamlet is by air, and the surrounding landscape is mostly empty of humans for hundreds of kilometres in all directions.

But despite its size, remote location and relative anonymity, Clyde River is now getting more attention than it’s ever had before. All because it has decided to single-handedly take on the oil industry. Read the rest of this entry

Oilsands producers face harsh reality of rout: There’s no one to save them this time

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Jeremy van Loon and Rebecca Penty, Bloomberg News/Financial Post, March 23, 2015

The collapse in the market for Canada’s heavy crude below $30 a barrel last week is hammering home a harsh reality for the nation’s oil-sands producers: There’s no one to save them this time.

Unlike previous market crashes that were relatively short- lived, the combination of persistent oversupplies and weakening demand are dealing a severe setback to what’s been one of the biggest growth stories in global energy markets. Oilsands companies such as Suncor Energy Inc. already have been rethinking major developments that can require more than $10 billion in investment. Now even existing projects are barely covering costs or in a losing position. Read the rest of this entry

Masked protesters allegedly steal Kinder Morgan equipment on Burnaby Mountain

A Kinder Morgan vehicle with its windows smashed, Burnaby Mountain, March 23, 2015. Photo: Metro News.

A Kinder Morgan vehicle with its windows smashed, Burnaby Mountain, March 23, 2015. Photo: Metro News.

By Emily Jackson, Metro Vancouver, March 23, 2015

The battle between protesters and Kinder Morgan flared up on Monday after masked men allegedly broke into a vehicle on Burnaby Mountain to steal surveying equipment.

“I understand that a window was smashed on one of the contractors vehicles and some surveying equipment was taken by a masked man who we believe has previously interfered with the survey work we’ve been undertaking,” Trans Mountain Pipeline spokeswoman Lizette Parsons Bell said. Read the rest of this entry

SWN Resources granted one-year extension to search for shale gas in New Brunswick

RCMP surround "thumper" seismic testing vehicles contracted by SWN Resources, Nov 14, 2013.

RCMP surround “thumper” seismic testing vehicles contracted by SWN Resources, Nov 14, 2013.

CTV Atlantic, March 16, 2015

SWN Canada has just been granted a one-year extension on licenses they have to look for shale gas in New Brunswick.

The company’s licenses were set to expire today, but the New Brunswick government granted SWN Resources permission to extend their search.

“While a license to search gives the holder rights to the area in question, it is subject to government’s proposed moratorium on hydraulic fracturing. The moratorium will remain in place until our five conditions are addressed and the risks to our health, water and environment are fully understood,” says Energy and Miners Minister Donald Arseneault. Read the rest of this entry

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