Category Archives: Oil & Gas

Prince Albert, Sask., declares state of emergency over oil spill

north-sask-river-at-prince-albert

An oil slick on the North Saskatchewan River has prompted the city to shut off the intake to the water treatment plant. (Matthew Garand/CBC)

City rolling out emergency waterline from South Saskatchewan River as oil plume approaches

By Francois Biber, CBC News July 25, 2016

Prince Albert city council has declared a local state of emergency over an oil spill that threatens its water supply.

The declaration was one of the first orders of business at a special meeting of council Monday in the city of 35,000, Saskatchewan’s third largest.

A local state of emergency allows the city to evacuate neighbourhoods and take other measures to deal with the threat and helps pave the way for disaster assistance applications.  Read the rest of this entry

The evolution of a resistance movement

Unistoten gate bridge signs

You must state how your visit will benefit the Unist’ot’en people to be allowed across this checkpoint on a bridge over the Morice River. / Catherine Matheson

By CATHERINE MATHESON, Smithers Interior News, July 21, 2016

When you visit the Unist’ot’en camp 66 kilometres south of Houston, you may not get to stay.

You will stand at the checkpoint, wait, and then answer questions.  If you are from industry or government, if your presence involves an intention to do surveying or drilling work in the territory beyond the camp, or if you are unable to state how your visit will benefit the Unis’to’ten people, you will probably not receive consent to move forward across the Morice River bridge on the Morice West forest service road.

Unist’ot’en territory across the Morice River

The bridge is being held by representatives of the Unist’ot’en territory. Their first line of defence in withholding consent is their historical claim on the land. Their second is the 1997 Delgamuukw decision in the Canadian Supreme Court, which was signed by 35 Gitxsan and 13 Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs. One of those hereditary chiefs is Kneadebeas.

“Kneadebeas is my head chief,” said Freda Huson, appointed spokesperson for the chiefs of the Unisto’ot’en people. “The two prior Kneadebeas were my grandmother and my aunt. My aunt is the one whose oral testimony was proven in the courts (in the Delgamuukw case).”

“We are basically monitoring the land,” said Huson. “That’s been part of our tradition for thousands of years. People had to gain consent.

“Most times we do grant permission. We let berry pickers in and we let people come to fish or camp. The only reason we have to do things this way is because we have industry landing choppers (in our territory) even though we told them they don’t have our consent; they kept trying to sneak in.”

Freda and her husband Toghestiy have lived on the Unist’ot’en side of the bridge since 2010. They crossed it together several times last week as about 30 people arrived to attend the seventh annual Unist’ot’en action camp. They turned no one away, including a reporter from the Smithers Interior News.

Evolving from camp to community

After hearing Freda speak about the significance of the Morice River to salmon populations across the Northwest, crossing the bridge brings you to the hub of the camp with several new structures. These include a bunkhouse, a kitchen and meeting house, and a three-story healing centre under construction as the second part of a three-phase project.

The well-documented Unist’ot’en refusal to allow pipelines through their territory remains a key focus, with a new theme chosen for this year’s action camp.

“The way that we’ve been running our action camps since the beginning has been to train people in direct action techniques in the protection of the land,” said Toghestiy.

“We wanted to evolve and move into marketing. We want to get the message out to show that our camp is not confrontational and has never been confrontational, but we are also focusing on defensive factors that come into play whenever we are dealing with industry and government forces,” he said.

Innu community moves to bolster injunction request against Anticosti drilling

first-nations-gulf-of-st-lawrence

nnu Chief Jean-Charles Piétacho said Indigenous peoples are “affirming our rights” to be consulted, which he alleges has not happened when it comes to the Anticosti project. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

Request for provisional injunction follows permanent injunction request last Friday

CBC News, July 18, 2016

An Innu community is requesting a provisional injunction against drilling for oil and gas on Anticosti Island while a judge considers its request for a permanent stoppage.

Ekuanitshit Chief Jean-Charles Piétacho requested the provisional and interlocutory injunction Monday at a court in Quebec City.

The move follows a request Piétacho made for a permanent injunction last Friday and would ensure that no drilling can take place while a judge considers that case. Read the rest of this entry

Global energy market poor for B.C. LNG industry: analyst

Natural Gas LNG ship

A liquid natural gas tanker in Australia.

Global Sustainability Research says ‘gas glut’ and alternative energies behind B.C. LNG delays

By Samantha Garvey, CBC News July 16, 2016

Another delayed liquefied natural gas plant in B.C. has some wondering if the whole industry is in trouble.

An analyst with Global Sustainability Research says the delays are partly due to a ‘global glut’ bringing down energy prices around the globe. Read the rest of this entry

‘Global industry challenges’ delay LNG Canada’s Kitimat project

LNG tanker Japan

A liquefied natural gas tanker arrives at Sodegaura city in Chiba prefecture, east of Tokyo. There were conditions placed on marine routes and speeds after an environmental assessment of the LNG Canada project. (STR/AFP/Getty )

Consortium says liquefied natural gas facility in Kitimat, B.C., still ‘a promising opportunity’

The Canadian Press, July 12, 2016

Instability in global energy markets has caused the international partners in a proposed liquefied natural gas project in Kitimat, B.C., to delay their final decision on the venture indefinitely.

LNG Canada CEO Andy Calitz said in a conference call Monday that a drop in natural gas prices around the world, particularly in Asia, has made the project too expensive for now. Read the rest of this entry

Ignoring First Nations concerns costs Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline

Enbridge Line 9 toronto protestBut environmentalists warn the battle is not over – with the B.C. pipeline project all but dead now there will be even more industry pressure to approve the Kinder Morgan and Energy East projects

by Adria Vasil, Now Toronto, July 5, 2016

Two down. Two to go. That’s the new rallying cry of pipeline foes after the Federal Court of Appeal overturned approval last week of Enbridge’s 1,177-kilometre Northern Gateway pipeline project through northern BC.

Eight First Nations, four environmental groups and the country’s largest private sector union, Unifor, launched a joint case against the controversial pipeline last fall after the project had been given a conditional green light by the Harper government. One of the conditions of that approval was that Enbridge conduct meaningful consultations with affected First Nations.

Read the rest of this entry

Northern Gateway pipeline approval overturned

Enbridge comox protest 2012

Protest in Comox, BC, against Enbridge pipeline, 2012.

Federal Court of Appeal finds Canada failed to consult with First Nations on pipeline project

By Jason Proctor, CBC News, June 30, 2016

The Federal Court of Appeal has overturned approval of Enbridge’s controversial Northern Gateway project after finding Ottawa failed to properly consult the First Nations affected by the pipeline.

“We find that Canada offered only a brief, hurried and inadequate opportunity … to exchange and discuss information and to dialogue,” the ruling says.

“It would have taken Canada little time and little organizational effort to engage in meaningful dialogue on these and other subjects of prime importance to Aboriginal peoples. But this did not happen.” Read the rest of this entry

Altas documents industrialization of Northern B.C. First Nations’ territory

blueberry-first-nation-development-50-years

The Blueberry River First Nations released these maps in 2015 which compare industrial activity today to 50 years ago. (Blueberry River First Nations)

Blueberry River First Nations say logging, oil and gas and pollution destroying traditional territory

By Liam Britten, CBC News, June 29, 2016

A new report from the Blueberry River First Nations in northeastern B.C. says industrial activity is destroying their traditional territory.

The report, entitled Atlas of cumulative landscape disturbance in the traditional territory of Blueberry River First Nations, found 84 percent of the First Nations’ traditional territory is within 500 metres of an “industrial disturbance” such as an oil or gas well, roadways, forestry cut blocks, agriculture or seismic lines. Read the rest of this entry

Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs’ Statement Against TransCanada

Published to Youtube on Jun 16, 2016

On June 13, 2016 the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs interrupted  the “Wet’suwet’en Matrilineal Coalition” meeting with Transcanada  on Laksilyu territory.

Read the rest of this entry

Video: A LAST STAND FOR LELU – PART 1: They Will Come

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