Category Archives: Uncategorized

28 people charged after Muskrat Falls protests

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Protesters slowed work at the Muskrat Falls work site in Labrador in 2016. (Katie Breen/CBC)

Charges announced by RCMP on Tuesday

CBC News, March 7, 2017

Twenty-eight people have been charged in connection with last year’s protests at the Muskrat Falls site, the RCMP announced on Tuesday afternoon.

A total of 60 charges were laid, including mischief, breaches of a court order, and taking a motor vehicle without consent. Read the rest of this entry

Group rallies for Prince Albert prisoners

scar-rallyby Brian Fitzpatrick, Regina Leader-Post, March 1, 2017

In the wake of the deadly prison riot in Prince Albert in December, a small crowd led by the Saskatchewan Coalition Against Racism (SCAR) rallied in Regina on Wednesday to protest against ongoing conditions at the penitentiary.

The unrest at the Saskatchewan Penitentiary — thought to have first erupted over food standards — left Jason Leonard Bird, 43, dead and eight prisoners wounded after fires were lit, fittings smashed, and weapons, including firearms, used by guards.  Read the rest of this entry

Report suggesting mercury still leaking near Grassy Narrows ‘deeply concerning,’ chief says

grassy-narrows-warning-signOngoing contamination ‘unequivocally related’ from mercury spilled decades ago at paper mill, scientists say

CBC News, Feb 28, 2017

A team of scientists has released a report suggesting that an old chemical plant in Dryden, Ont., is still leaking mercury and contaminating the Wabigoon-English River system upstream from the Grassy Narrows First Nation in northwestern Ontario. Read the rest of this entry

‘No ban on stolen land,’ say Indigenous activists in U.S.

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During protests against Trump’s Muslim ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).

Native American activists join the fight against the U.S. immigration ban

By Lenard Monkman, CBC News, Feb 02, 2017

Indigenous activists have started a social media campaign that has caught traction on both sides of the border using the slogan “no ban on stolen land.”

They joined the protests at American airports this past weekend, standing in solidarity with Muslim people and their allies against U.S. President Donald Trump’s travel ban, and tried to educate the public at the same time.  Read the rest of this entry

‘Over my dead body’: tribe aims to block Trump’s border wall on Arizona land

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The US-Mexico border fence on the Tohono O’odham reservation. Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Controlling 2.8m acres of a reservation, the Tohono O’odham Nation vowed to oppose construction on its land and called for a meeting with the president

by Sam Levin, The Guardian, January 26, 2017

Donald Trump’s proposed border wall could face a major obstacle in Arizona, where an indigenous tribe has vowed to oppose construction on its land, paving the way for potential mass resistance following the model of Standing Rock.

The Tohono O’odham Nation, a federally recognized tribe with a reservation that spans 75 miles of the US-Mexico border, announced on Thursday that it does not support the wall and criticized the White House for signing an executive order without consulting the tribe.

Read the rest of this entry

Decades later, Grassy Narrows First Nation waits for solution to mercury poisoning

grassy-narrows-warning-signCBC News, January 18, 2017

The Grassy Narrows community in northern, Ont., has been plagued with mercury poisoning  for decades — affecting its river, its fish, and its people.

In the 1970s, Kas Glowacki, who worked in the old Dryden, Ont., pulp and paper mill — upstream from Grassy Narrows First Nations — emptied out a salt vat and came across mercury. Read the rest of this entry

Land Protectors in Labrador shut down Aboriginal Affairs office in Goose Bay again over #MuskratFalls promises

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Protesters shut down Aboriginal Affairs office. Photo: APTN National News.

by Trina Roache, APTN National News, January 13, 2017

A group of Labrador land protectors shut down the Office of Aboriginal Affairs in Happy Valley- Goose Bay early Friday morning as part of ongoing protests against the Muskrat Falls hydro-electric project.

The group blocked employees who showed up to work at 8 a.m. from entering the office for Newfoundland and Labrador’s Aboriginal Affairs, which also houses the local constituency office for the province’s Environment Minister Perry Trimper. Read the rest of this entry

Statement from the family of Arthur Manuel on his passing

art1On Wednesday January 11, 2017 at 11:00 PM, Arthur Manuel, our beloved father, grandfather, husband, brother, uncle, warrior, and teacher passed away. Arthur was one of our most determined and outspoken Secwepemc leaders and activists—a pillar in the resistance, known globally for his tireless advocacy for Indigenous Peoples’ right to self-determination. He passed on into the spirit world surrounded by many generations of his loving family. Read the rest of this entry

Indigenous leader, activist, Arthur Manuel dead at 66

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Arthur Manuel, Secwepemc.

Manuel was former Chief of Neskonlith Indian Band, chair of Shuswap Nation Tribal Council

CBC News January 12, 2017

A widely respected Indigenous leader and activist from the Secwepemc Nation has died. Arthur Manuel was 66-years-old.

The son of the late George Manuel, who founded the National Indian Brotherhood — precursor to the Assembly of First Nations — Arthur Manuel entered the world of Indigenous politics in the 1970s, as president of the Native Youth Association. Read the rest of this entry

BC Hydro facing federal order, heavy fines for Site C sediment and erosion problems

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Out of the fog, earth moving equipment keeps going at a steady pace on slope stabilization work in the site preparation for BC Hydro’s Site C dam construction project. Derrick Penner / PNG

by Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun, January 5, 2017

BC Hydro is facing a federal order as early as Friday and potential fines of up to $400,000 due to erosion and sediment problems at the $9-billion Site C dam project in the province’s northeast.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has issued Hydro with a “notice of intent” to proceed with enforcement action unless the provincial Crown corporation provides assurances that problems are being addressed. Read the rest of this entry