Category Archives: Warrior

Gustafsen Lake standoff: protesters renew calls for an inquiry

TsPeten wolverine arrest helicopter

William John Ignace, known as Wolverine, is led from a helicopter by an RCMP officer on Sept. 17, 1995 after the month-long armed standoff at Gustafsen Lake ended. (Canadian Press)

In the 1995 standoff 400 officers confronted about 20 protesters

By Daybreak Kamloops, CBC News Jan 18, 2016

Several First Nations protesters involved in the 1995 Gustafsen Lake standoff are calling for a national inquiry into the level of force used by the RCMP during the 31-day confrontation.

Protest leader William Jones Ignace, known as Wolverine, and the Ts’Peten Defence Committee submitted a letter on Jan. 4  to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Attorney General and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould, calling for an inquiry. Read the rest of this entry

Gustafsen Lake warrior granted political asylum in US wants return home to Canada

TsPeten James Pitawanakwat 1

James Pitawanakwat during the 1995 siege at Ts’Peten/Gustafsen Lake, BC.

by Jorge Barrera, APTN National News, January 15, 2016
A Wikwemikong man who was given political asylum in the U.S. following the 1995 Gustafsen Lake armed standoff in British Columbia wants to return to Canada.

James “OJ” Pitawanakwat, 44, has lived in the U.S. since August 1998 when he crossed the border while on day parole in Canada.

The U.S. Federal Court for the District of Oregon denied Canada’s extradition request for Pitawanakwat in November 2000 on grounds his actions in B.C. were “of a political character” and qualified for an exemption under the extradition treaty between Canada and the U.S. Read the rest of this entry

Secwepemc elder Wolverine calls for inquiry into 1995 Ts’Peten Standoff

TsPeten wolverine signs

Ts’Peten siege, 1995.  Secwepemc elder Wolverine in centre.

This letter by Wolverine is being sent to the Government today. He is calling for a national public inquiry into Gustafsen Lake. Please share his letter to the Government of Canada calling for a public inquiry.

Under Liberal Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, Canada’s largest paramilitary operation was carried out on the sacred Sundance lands at Ts’Peten in 1995. Armoured personnel carriers, .50 calibre machine guns, land mines, and an astonishing 77,000 rounds of ammunition were directed at the land defenders. A police note by Chief Superintendent Johnston stated: “There are 6 hardliners in the camp WHO WILL REQUIRE KILLING.”

Read the rest of this entry

10-year-old First Nations girl earns black belt in taekwondo

black-belt

Aurora Lavallee stands in between her master Clint Norman and her father Ira Lavallee. (Submitted by Ira Lavallee to CBC News)

Aurora Lavallee first started the martial art at age 5

CBC News, Dec 21, 2015

Aurora Lavallee is a shy 10-year-old girl until she hits the taekwondo mat.

She earned her first-degree black belt over the weekend at St. Anne’s Parish in Regina, making her one of the youngest First Nations girls to achieve this level in the martial art. Read the rest of this entry

FBI interferes with exhibit of work by the renowned Native American artist Leonard Peltier

Leonard Peltierby International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee, 14 November 2015

FBI interferes with exhibit of work by the renowned Native American artist Leonard Peltier

An art exhibit commemorating National Native American Month at the state Department of Labor and Industries building, Tumbwater, Washington, is being dismantled in response to complaints received from law enforcers. Read the rest of this entry

Mi’kmaq resistance kept British holed up in their forts, historian finds

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi'kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi’kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

Tod Scott says Halifax founder Edward Cornwallis couldn’t suppress early Mi’kmaq pushback

By Jerry West, CBC News, Oct 22, 2015

In the early clashes between the British and Mi’kmaq, the British usually came out on the losing end, new research suggests.

The Mi’kmaq were so successful at defending against the settlers, British soldiers were often too scared to leave their forts, according to historical documents.

Read the rest of this entry

Video: WARRIOR, The Life of Leonard Peltier

Posted to Youtube by Suzie Baer, Oct 17, 2015

This is the definitive feature documentary about American Indian activist, Leonard Peltier. His story is told within the context of the American Indian Movement, the US federal government, and the multi national companies interested in mining the land in South Dakota.

Read the rest of this entry

Knives and Daggers of the Pacific Northwest Coast

Steel war dagger with abalone inlay, designed to represent a dogfish Collected by A. Mackenzie, 1884 Haida, Masset, Queen Charlotte Islands (VII-B-948) Same as images no 30 and 31. Canadian Museum of History

Steel war dagger with abalone inlay, designed to represent a dogfish [although it appears to be a wolf]. Collected by A. Mackenzie, 1884, Haida, Masset, Queen Charlotte Islands (VII-B-948). Canadian Museum of History.

by Warrior Publications, Sept 30, 2015

Prior to European colonization, Indigenous peoples on the Pacific Northwest Coast used a variety of knives and daggers.  These were most commonly made from bone and, in the northern region, copper.  When the first European colonizers encountered Indigenous peoples along the coast in the late 1700s, they already had terms for iron and steel and were familiar with their uses as well as basic forging techniques.  It is speculated that iron and steel found their way to the coastal nations as a result of trade and ship wrecks. Read the rest of this entry

Another UFC win for B.C.’s Kajan Johnson

Burns Lake native Kajan Johnson (top) scored a big win Saturday at UFC Fight Night 75 in Japan. POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Burns Lake native Kajan Johnson (top) scored a big win Saturday at UFC Fight Night 75 in Japan. POSTMEDIA NETWORK

There are a lot of good guys in the sport of MMA that you can’t help but cheer for. Local fighter Kajan Johnson (21-11-1) is near the top of that list, and he was back in a UFC Octagon Saturday night.

It’s been a lifetime of adversity for the 31-year-old from Burns Lake. For well over a decade, Johnson’s one dream was to make it to the UFC, but a second career-threatening orbital bone injury in 2012 almost derailed those plans. Read the rest of this entry

Ts’Peten: 20 Year Anniversary Gathering

TsPeten 20 year anniversary 1 Read the rest of this entry

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