Category Archives: Warrior Fieldcraft

Aiming high: Young sharpshooters take part in rifle competition at Indigenous Games

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Mark Anthony Roberts, 17, competes in rifle shooting at the North American Indigenous Games on Wednesday. (CBC)

Transition from hunting to competition a natural one for many athletes at North American Indigenous Games

By Tim Fontaine, CBC News, July 19, 2017

The rifle shooting competition is in its second day at the North American Indigenous Games, with dozens of young sharpshooters from across the continent hitting target after target at the Toronto International Trap & Skeet Club in Cookstown, Ont., on Wednesday. Read the rest of this entry

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Bug Out Bag System

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A forest fire burns near Kelowna, BC, 2013.

by Sakej Ward, July 9, 2017
Considering the wild fires in BC and the provincial state of emergency, I know their is a lot of our people wondering how to prepare for such an emergency. I want to help out, a little bit, by providing a packing list for a Bug Out Bag System, think of it as a evacuation bag list. If you are in a threatened area and may have to face the threat of a wild fire start to prepare now.  Hope is not a strategy! Read the rest of this entry

Individual Operational Readiness

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Protesters against Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, January 2017, equipped with as masks, shields and other gear.

by Sakej Ward

Do you have an impact on the “battlefield” or are you a liability? Do you possess a wide range of activist’s conflict skills? Are your skills up to speed? Not all activists are created equal.

The come-as-you are activist, the person who shows up at crisis events with intent to engage in obsolete, ineffectual, passive tactics that requires so very little skill and equipment (gear) is an amateur who treats the struggle for justice more as a social gathering (a crisis pow wow with endless opportunities to get selfies) than a war.

Read the rest of this entry

The Operational Pack

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Warriors at Oka, 1990; the warrior in the centre wears web gear (what appears to be an ALICE belt and suspenders with canteen and pouches), described as level 2 gear in the article below.

by Sakej Ward, May 4, 2017
Can you conduct actions without your mission essential equipment? How long can you stay in the field without resupply? Mission duration in the field (away from camp) is the key to independent or long range actions. How operational ready are you without key equipment? Read the rest of this entry

Shuswap band carves canoes for 1st time in 60 years

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Tanner Francois (L) poses with Frank Marchand (R). Marchand, from the Okanagan Indian Band, is helping members of the Little Shuswap Indian Band — including Francois — carve two canoes. (Doug Herbert/CBC)

‘Being able to be taught to do something my ancestors were doing — it’s like I’m following in their footsteps’

CBC News, March 8, 2017

The Little Shuswap Indian Band in B.C.’s Shuswap region is carving canoes for the first time in over 60 years.

The band partnered with the Okanagan Indian Band to relearn canoe-making skills and every day band members have been working on the shores of Little Shuswap Lake at Quaaout Lodge carving out two large canoes. Read the rest of this entry

‘The barrenlands are not a friendly place,’ says N.W.T. trapper after 2 searches in 1 month

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With little vegetation, deep crevices in the rocks, and its remote location, the area around MacKay Lake, N.W.T., can be dangerous for hunters. (submitted by Colin Patrick)

Two searches have been launched in the past month near Mackay Lake

By Alex Brockman, CBC News, Feb 25, 2017

The barrenlands of the Northwest Territories have been known as a dangerous place for hundreds of years.

It’s unforgiving. There are few signs of vegetation beyond the treeline, treacherous crevices in the rocks and freezing winds bringing temperatures below —50. The Dene have traditional stories of people going in and never coming back. Read the rest of this entry

Highway closures in B.C. raise concerns about local food security during disaster

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Coquihalla Highway closed in February 2017 due to heavy snowfall, leaving transport trucks and private vehicles stuck on the highway overnight.

Experts say communities have between 3-5 days of supplies before more needs to be shipped in

By Andrew Kurjata and Ash Kelly, CBC News, Feb 15, 2017

A series of highway closures has highlighted how dependent B.C. communities are on regular shipments of food and supplies and raised questions about what would happen to that supply chain during a prolonged emergency. Read the rest of this entry

PDF: Small Unit Leader’s Guide to Mountain Warfare Operations

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US Marines conduct mountain/winter warfare training.

Since moving to Gitxsan territory in northern BC, and with the onset of winter bringing -20 Degrees Celsius weather, I’ve acquired a renewed interest in winter survival techniques.  During the course of research I came across this US Marine Corps manual on mountain warfare operations, which also includes winter warfare, and thought it might be of use to some readers living in regions with extreme cold temperatures. Read the rest of this entry

Photo Essay: Trail Building in Maxhla Didaat

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Looking north from the cabin at Maxhla Didaat.

I recently had the opportunity to travel to Maxhla Didaat, a Gitxsan territory belonging to the House of Gwininitxw.  I was part of a crew working on building trails for trap lines in the territory, which is located about 100 km north of Kispiox, “BC.”  Read the rest of this entry

Indigenous Alberta youth reconnect with nature and culture at Ghost River Rediscovery camp

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Ghost River Rediscovery camp west of Calgary teaches survival skills and Aboriginal traditions to kids and teens. (Courtesy of Ghost River Rediscovery)

City kids sleep in teepees and learn Aboriginal traditions from Blackfoot, Cree and Metis elders

By Danielle Nerman, CBC News July 27, 2016

The Ghost River Rediscovery camp west of Calgary can only be reached by gravel road and a river crossing.

While the journey through the wooded forest of the Stoney Nation is not super strenuous, it can be daunting for campers who have never lived off the grid.

“A lot of these kids are pretty city-based. So we’ve got kids who have never camped before, never built shelter, don’t know how build fire,” said Kristie Schneider, the camp’s director of operations. Read the rest of this entry