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SANTA Fe: 12 Arrested Protesting Conquistador Celebration on Stolen Pueblo Land

 

Santa Fe Entrada protest 5By Daniel J. Chacón and Andrew Oxford,

A long-running annual pageant recalling the 1692 retaking of Santa Fe by Spanish conquistadors spurred raucous, roving protests Friday that wound through downtown streets and resulted in at least eight arrests.

The clash over the Entrada, anticipated amid heightened racial and ethnic tensions nationally, pushed a simmering conflict over Santa Fe’s own legacy of colonialism to a new level. Coming after city leaders had appealed for reconciliation between organizers of the Fiesta de Santa Fe and Native American activists, the fracas that unfolded on and around the Santa Fe Plaza seemed a big step back from diffusing a controversy at the heart of the community’s very identity.

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Australia On this day: Pemulwuy is killed

Aaustralia Pemulwuy_aka_PimbloyRemembering the Indigenous resistance fighter determined to maintain Aboriginal traditions by resisting British rule.

BY Angela Heathcote, Australian geographic, June 1, 2017

ON 2 JUNE 1802, Pemulwuy was killed, bringing an abrupt end to his long- fought battles with encroaching British settlers. Two European colonisers shot dead the Indigenous resistance fighter – an original inhabitant of Toongabbie and Parramatta area, determined to Indigenous ownership of the land. Read the rest of this entry

NoCanada: Looking for Contributors and Co-Conspirators!

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Militants burn Canadian flag during anti-Canada Day protests in Vancouver, BC.

From Montreal Counter-Information

Celebrations of the canadian state’s 150th anniversary are well underway and are looking to heat up as we approach July 1st. Over the past couple of months a few of us have been putting together a website/multimedia project against the canada 150 project as well as to put forward ideas that are against the state, colonization, capitalism, and all the misery that “canada” has meant for so many people.

We’re looking for your help to pull it off! Read the rest of this entry

Native Liberation: The Way Forward

Wolf black packby Nick Estes, The Red Nation

These were the concluding remarks to the first annual Native Liberation 2016 Conference convened at the Larry Casuse Center in Albuquerque, NM on Aug. 13, 2016. Nick Estes is a co-founder of The Red Nation and a member of the Leadership Council.

The Red Nation formed in November 2014 out of a collective desire to create a platform for revolutionary Native organizing and to fight back against this settler colonial system that seeks our annihilation. That very summer, two Navajo men, our relatives Allison “Cowboy” Gorman and Kee “Rabbit” Thompson, were brutally murdered by three non-Native men. The story is familiar to most of us. Read the rest of this entry

Philippines: Anniversary of Battle of Mactan

Filipino battle of Mactan 1

Battle of Mactan mural in Cebu, Fort San Pedro painting, Philippines;  scene depicts the leader of the Mactan warriors, Lapu-Lapu killing Magellan, commander of the Spanish forces.

On this day in 1521 Indigenous peoples on the island of Mactan in present-day Philippines defeated a heavily armed Spanish force and killed their commander, Magellan.  This was the first Spanish attempt at colonizing what would eventually become the Philippines. Read the rest of this entry

Mi’kmaq resistance kept British holed up in their forts, historian finds

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi'kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi’kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

Tod Scott says Halifax founder Edward Cornwallis couldn’t suppress early Mi’kmaq pushback

By Jerry West, CBC News, Oct 22, 2015

In the early clashes between the British and Mi’kmaq, the British usually came out on the losing end, new research suggests.

The Mi’kmaq were so successful at defending against the settlers, British soldiers were often too scared to leave their forts, according to historical documents.

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Long Shadow of the Pines: 25 Years Since the 1990 Oka Crisis

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My name is Clifton Arihwakehte Nicholas, I am a Kanienkehaka (Mohawk) from Kanehsatake (Oka).  I was a young man involved in the 1990 Oka Crisis from it’s start and throughout that summer.  The Crisis was a critical point both in my life and in the community of Kanehsatake.  It’s impact is still being felt in Kanehsatake and moreover throughout Indigenous communities and movements in Canada from coast to coast.  An examination and retrospection of those events needs to be told by those intimately involved in that historic summer.  Furthermore a wider perspective as to the impact the crisis had on Indigenous people, movements and the government responses to them in light of the events of 1990 from Idle No More to Elsipogtog. Read the rest of this entry

Book Review: The Victory With No Name

The Miami Confederacy ambushed Gen. Arthur St. Clair’s force in the worst defeat of an army by indigenous forces in American history. Art by Peter Dennis from Osprey’s “Wabash 1791: St Clair’s Defeat.”

The Miami Confederacy ambushed Gen. Arthur St. Clair’s force in the worst defeat of an army by indigenous forces in American history.
Art by Peter Dennis from Osprey’s “Wabash 1791: St Clair’s Defeat.”

by Peter d’Errico, Indian Country Today, march 9, 2015

Professor Colin Calloway’s new book, The Victory With No Name, chronicles how a confederation of Native nations defeated the U.S. Army when it invaded Indian lands across the Ohio River in 1791. Calloway, as usual, tells the story well, with lucid prose and thorough documentation.

The invasion, by the first army organized by the United States, under the command of Major Gen. Arthur St. Clair, aimed at the destruction of Indian villages along the Maumee River to open the way for “settlers” (as if the land were not already settled—an example of the way language can obscure reality) and land speculators. The success of the Indians thwarted the invasion, scattered the “settlers,” and discouraged the speculators. Read the rest of this entry

Maori commemorate 150 years since Battle of Orakau against British

 

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