Blog Archives

Secret deal between Canada’s spies and border guards raises concerns

C-51, controversial anti-terrorism bill, is now law. So, what changes?

Ts'Peten siege, 1995; near the town of 100 Mile House, BC, over 450 heavily armed RCMP equipped with armoured personnel carriers from the Canadian military laid siege to a Secwepemc sundance camp.  During the year long trial in 1997, it was revealed that the RCMP had engaged in a self-proclaimed "smear and disinformation" campaign, had opened fire on unarmed individuals and detonated an explosive device under a truck used by defenders in an agreed upon no-shooting zone.

Ts’Peten siege, 1995; near the town of 100 Mile House, BC, over 450 heavily armed RCMP equipped with armoured personnel carriers from the Canadian military laid siege to a Secwepemc sundance camp. In the year long trial that resulted, it was revealed that police had fabricated shooting incidents, released misinformation about who was in the camp, and had attempted to shoot and kill unarmed people in agreed upon no shooting zones. 

Here are 5 differences you may notice now the anti-terror legislation has royal assent

By Haydn Watters, CBC News, June 18, 2015

Bill C-51, the Conservatives’ anti-terror legislation, received royal assent Thursday afternoon and is now law.

The bill has faced intense scrutiny for the expanded powers it gives the police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

Opponents argue the bill’s wording is too vague, which could lead to dangerous and unlawful measures. Read the rest of this entry

Bill C-51 Anti-Terrorism Act passes in House of Commons

Bill C 51 graphicPassed third reading by a margin of 183 to 96

The Canadian Press/CBC News, May 6, 2015

The federal government’s controversial new anti-terrorism bill has won the approval of the House of Commons.

The Anti-Terrorism Act, also known as Bill C-51, easily passed third reading by a margin of 183 to 96, thanks to the Conservative government’s majority and the promised support of the third-party Liberals.

The legislation gives the Canadian Security Intelligence Service more power to thwart suspected terrorist plots — not just gather information about them. Read the rest of this entry

Spies, lies and the myth of ‘oversight’ at CSIS

Bill C-51 hearings: First Nations could be targeted, Pam Palmater says

Indigenous right activist Pam Palmater and Toronto Police inspector Steve Irwin appear before the House public safety committee, which is currently reviewing the government's proposed anti-terror legislation. (CBC)

Indigenous right activist Pam Palmater and Toronto Police inspector Steve Irwin appear before the House public safety committee, which is currently reviewing the government’s proposed anti-terror legislation. (CBC)

Bill ‘less about Jihadists under every bed… more about increasing the output of tarsands’: Stewart Phillip

By Kady O’Malley, CBC News, March 24, 2015

First Nations activists may find themselves targets of the Conservatives’ proposed anti-terror law, which could “criminalize [their] private thoughts,” Mi’kmaq lawyer Pam Palmater warned the House public safety committee on Tuesday.

She called on the government to withdraw its proposed anti-terror legislation entirely.

Palmater, who currently holds a chair in indigenous governance at Ryerson University, began her testimony by acknowledging that the committee was meeting on traditional Algonquin territory — a fact that, she said, addresses the issue at the heart of the flaws in the bill, as it depends on the continued co-operation between First Nations and Canadian governments. Read the rest of this entry

Anti-terror bill would widen powers for Canadian border guards

Anti-Oil Activists Named as National Security Threats Respond to Leaked RCMP Report

Protest against Enbridge's proposed Line 9, in Toronto.

Protest against Enbridge’s proposed Line 9, in Toronto.

By Michael Toledano, Vice.com, Feb 17, 2015

As the Harper government’s Bill C-51 moves to extend anti-terrorism legislation to include anyone who interferes with the “critical infrastructure,” “territorial integrity,” or “economic and financial stability of Canada,” a leaked report from the RCMP’s Critical Infrastructure Intelligence Team demonstrates how aboriginals and environmentalists are already being targeted by law enforcement for these reasons.

Read the rest of this entry

‘Anti-petroleum’ movement a growing security threat to Canada, RCMP say

CSIS is about to become more ‘kinetic.’ Bad idea

Bill C-51 aims to ‘remove terrorist propaganda’ from internet

Internet 1Free speech, privacy concerns raised about anti-terrorism bill’s internet clauses

By Daniel Schwartz, CBC News, Jan 31, 2015

The anti-terrorism bill unveiled Friday by Prime Minister Stephen Harper includes a section that gives his government the power “to order the removal of terrorist propaganda” from the internet.

That would still require a judicial order, as well as the attorney general’s support to push for the removal of such web content.

If the proposed legislation becomes law, a judge could order an internet service provider, or the “custodian” of “the computer system,” to remove web content the judge considers terrorist propaganda. Read the rest of this entry