Blog Archives

Brazil Suspends License for Controversial Amazon Dam

tapajos_warriorWednesday, April 20, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Brasilia, Brazil: In a surprising move, IBAMA, the administrative arm of the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment, suspended the process of environmental licensing for the controversial São Luiz do Tapajós Dam in the Brazilian Amazon yesterday. International Rivers welcomes this decision as an important breakthrough for the protection of rivers and indigenous rights in the Amazon.

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The Ka’apor of Brazil Use Bows, Arrows, Sabotage and GPS to Defend the Amazon from Logging

Ka’apor Indians stand next to a logging tractor that they discovered and set on fire inside the indigenous territory one month before. Photograph: Lunae Parracho/Greenpeace

Ka’apor Indians stand next to a logging tractor that they discovered and set on fire inside the indigenous territory one month before. Photograph: Lunae Parracho/Greenpeace

by Jonathan Watts, The Guardian, Sept 10, 2015 (via Earth First! Newswire)

With bows, arrows, GPS trackers and camera traps, an indigenous community in northern Brazil is fighting to achieve what the government has long failed to do: halt illegal logging in their corner of the Amazon.

The Ka’apor – a tribe of about 2,200 people in Maranhão state – have organised a militia of “forest guardians” who follow a strategy of nature conservation through aggressive confrontation. Read the rest of this entry

Brazil indigenous group clashes with police in Congress

Brazil congress clash 1BBC News,

Brazilian indigenous protesters armed with bows and arrows have clashed with police inside the National Congress building in the capital, Brasilia.  The group, with some 30 men, tried to break into the building to protest against a bill on indigenous lands.  Police officers used pepper spray and blocked access to a committee that was due to vote on the proposal.  An arrow struck a policeman’s boot but he was uninjured, said the Brazilian authorities.  Following the brief confrontation, the committee session was called off. Read the rest of this entry

Munduruku Indians occupy Brazil government building

Munduruku warriors inside the FUNAI offices they occupied, Nov 28, 2014.

Munduruku warriors inside the FUNAI offices they occupied in Itaitiba, Nov 28, 2014.

By Sid Douglas, The Speaker, Nov 28, 2014

A band of Munduruku Indians occupied a Brazilian government building in Itaitiba city, Para state, Friday, demanding that the government address the problem of loggers and gold miners incurring on their traditional land. The tribe held the building’s staff hostage peacefully, but threatened “a conflict of unimaginable proportions” if the government did not take action and the invaders persisted, which, they said, the government would be responsible for.

“We want [politicians in] Brasília to quickly demarcate our land,” said the chief Juarez Saw Munduruku, “because we look after this land much better than the Brazilian government bodies do.” Read the rest of this entry

Military Personnel Trained by the CIA Used Napalm Against Indigenous People in Brazil

Indigenous people of ethnic Pataxo struggle to return their lands. In October 2014, they closed the highway to pressure the government. (Photo: Santiago Navarro F.)

Indigenous people of ethnic Pataxo struggle to return their lands. In October 2014, they closed the highway to pressure the government. (Photo: Santiago Navarro F.)

by Santiago Navarro F., Renata Bessi and Translated by Miriam Taylor, Truthout via Intercontinental Cry on November 11, 2014

TRUTHOUT–For the first time in the history of Brazil, the federal government is investigating the deaths and abuses suffered by Indigenous peoples during military dictatorship (1964-1985). The death toll may be twenty times more than previously known.

Just as in World War II and Vietnam, napalm manufactured in the US burned the bodies of hundreds of indigenous individuals in Brazil, people without an army and without weapons. The objective was to take over their lands. Indigenous peoples in this country suffered the most from the atrocities committed during the military dictatorship (1964-1985) – with the support of the United States. For the first time in Brazil’s history, the National Truth Commission, created by the federal government in 2012 in order to investigate political crimes committed by the State during the military dictatorship, gives statistics showing that the number of indigenous individuals killed could be 20 times greater than was previously officially registered by leftist militants.

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The World Cup Mega-Disaster Is On

Brazil FIFA go homeBy Hanna Hurr, Mask Magazine, June 12, 2014
The World Cup started today, and with it the culmination of a much longer power battle between Brazilians who vehemently detest the World Cup and the authorities who defend it.

Hours before the opening game of the World Cup, Brazilians took to the streets once again to protest and disrupt the games — the most expensive World Cup in history, which cost Brazil over $11 billion. In São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belo Horizonte, protesters clashed with police while blocking a highway, trying to enter a stadium, protesting public spending, and rioting. Read the rest of this entry

Brazil: Munduruku People Kick Miners Off Indigenous Territory, Seize Equipment

Munduruku warriors on their way to evict miners from their territory, Feb 2014.

Munduruku warriors on their way to evict miners from their territory, Feb 2014.

by Larissa Saud, Terra Magazine
Translated from Portuguese by Thomas Walker / Earth First! Newswire, Feb 3, 2014

Night had hardly arrived when indigenous Munduruku people landed on the bank of a mine on Tropas River, a tributary of Tapajós river, in a region west of Pará.  From the five speedboats, all of them full, came warriors and children, all with one objective: to drive out illegal miners from Munduruku land. Read the rest of this entry

2013 Indigenous Games in Brazil: Photos and article

A Pataxo Indian takes part in the bow and arrow competition during the indigenous games in Cuiaba, Brazil, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013.

A Pataxo Indian takes part in the bow and arrow competition during the indigenous games in Cuiaba, Brazil, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013.

Brazil indigenous protest blocks major iron ore railway

BBC news, 10 July 2013

Indigenous people in Brazil block a railway during protests against new legislation, Oct 2, 2012.

Indigenous people in Brazil block a railway during protests against new legislation, Oct 2, 2012.

Brazilian indigenous people in the Amazon region have blocked one of the country’s most important railways in a protest for better public services.

The railway is owned by mining giant Vale and connects the world’s largest iron ore mine, Carajas, to a port on the northern coast near Sao Luis. Read the rest of this entry

Indigenous groups re-occupy Belo Monte dam in the Amazon‏

Jeremy Hance, mongabay.com, October 09, 2012

Previous blockade of the Belo Monte dam construction in Brazil by Indigenous peoples.

Construction on Brazil’s megadam, Belo Monte, has been halted again as around 150 demonstrators, most of them from nearby indigenous tribes, have occupied the main construction site at Pimental. Over a hundred indigenous people joined local fishermen who had been protesting the dam for 24 days straight. Indigenous people and local fishermen say the dam will devastate the Xingu River, upending their way of life. Read the rest of this entry