Blog Archives

Chevron in talks to sell minority stake in Kitimat LNG project: sources

Chevron gas stationAmong the parties in talks with Chevron for a possible stake in the Canadian LNG project are Petronas, the sources said

by John Tilak, Ernest Scheyder and David French, Financial Post,

TORONTO/HOUSTON — Chevron Corp is exploring options including the sale of a minority stake in its Canadian liquefied natural gas (LNG) project as it pushes ahead, three people familiar with the matter told Reuters. Read the rest of this entry

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Canadian Indigenous leaders travel to see Ecuador environmental disaster

fontaine-ecuador

“This is how much money I made working with oil pipelines in Canada.”  Phil Fontaine, right, speaks to Indigenous leaders in Ecuador Wednesday. (Karen Hinton/Submitted)

The group hopes to ally with 60 Indigenous tribes in Ecuador to help them fight Chevron in Canadian court

By Brandi Morin, CBC News, September 27, 2017

Canadian Indigenous leaders witnessed first hand this week the devastation and pollution left behind by oil companies in Indigenous lands in Ecuador.

“What we’ve witnessed here is tragic…shocking,” said former Assembly of First Nations (AFN) leader Phil Fontaine, speaking from Quito via telephone. Read the rest of this entry

Update from Unist’ot’en Camp

Unistoten helicopter May 2017

by Unist’ot’en Camp, May 24, 2017

And so it begins! the skies are busy above camp today. The Construction Crew who are working on the Healing Center are constantly being interrupted by chopper activity flying overhead. Read the rest of this entry

Haisla Nation in tough waiting game as LNG delayed

oct-2-2014-haisla-haisla-chief-councillor-ellis-ross-w

Haisla chief councillor Ellis Ross with a view in the background of his community and Douglas Channel in the fall of 2014. At the time, community members had jobs to pick from as preliminary work for potential LNG projects was underway and Rio Tinto was in the midst of a major upgrade project on its aluminum smelter in Kitimat. Now, Haisla members are leaving town to look for work as LNG projects are in limbo and the aluminum plant project is complete. Gordon Hoekstra / Vancouver Sun

by Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun, May 27, 2016

The Haisla Nation, which supports two of the leading proposed major LNG projects in B.C., is in a tough waiting game as the projects remain in limbo.

Activity on both the $25-billion to $40-billion Shell-led LNG Canada project and the $12-billion Chevron-led Kitimat LNG project proposed for the Kitimat area in northwest B.C., where the Haisla claim traditional territory, have slowed to a crawl. Read the rest of this entry

Ecuadoreans can sue Chevron in Canada, Supreme Court rules

Everything We Know About the Possible RCMP Raid on the Unist’ot’en Camp

Unistoten bridge reinforcing 3By Julie Chadwick, Vice.com, September 1, 2015

Tension remains high in Northwestern BC as representatives from the Unist’ot’en clan and their legal representatives held a meeting with the RCMP regarding the fate of their settlement camp on Tuesday afternoon.

A non-violent occupation of unceded Unist’ot’en traditional territory since 2010, the camp was originally established to stand in the intended path of the Pacific Trail natural gas pipeline. It has since expanded to include structures built directly in the path of the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline and the TransCanada Coastal Gaslink pipeline, encompassed within a sweeping declaration that all pipelines are banned from their territories. A checkpoint ensures that no one enters or leaves the territory without their direct consent.

Read the rest of this entry

In British Columbia, indigenous group blocks pipeline development

Gate at Unist'ot'en camp, photo: Al Jazeera.

Gate at Unist’ot’en camp, photo: Al Jazeera.

August 20, 2015

HOUSTON, British Columbia — In a remote mountain pass connecting the Pacific Coast to the interior of British Columbia, a region brimming with wild berries and populated by grouse and grizzly bears, felled and painted trees have been laid across a logging road to form an enormous message. Directed at air traffic, it reads “No pipelines! No entry!” The warning marks off land where the government of Canada and a First Nations clan hold irreconcilable views of what should happen to a 435-square-mile area each claims as its own.

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Chevron officials kicked out of Unist’ot’en

July 25, 2015 via Submedia

Yesterday Chevron, the company behind the Pacific Trails fracking pipeline, attempted to enter our unceded territories. They have no consent from our chiefs and our hereditary governance system, who are standing strong in their stance against all pipelines. Next to the Wedzin Kwah river, which is pure enough to drink from, Chevron presented us with an offering of bottled water and industrial tobacco. Read the rest of this entry

RCMP blocked from entering Unist’ot’en Camp

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/133859916″>RCMP Blocked from enetering Unist'ot'en Camp</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/submediatv”>subMedia.tv</a&gt; on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

by Unist’ot’en Camp, July 18, 2015

We have not signed any treaties permitting Canada to police our territories, yet the RCMP has been attempting to exercise illegal authority on our unceded lands. We have informed them of our protocols and Unist’ot’en law for entry.

Unist’ot’en Call for Physical Support and Solidarity

Members of Unis'tot'en camp, November 2012.

Members of Unis’tot’en camp, November 2012.

July 18, 2015
Dear Friends and Supporters,
Thanks to everyone who responded to our Action Camp and Chevron PTP  update. It is becoming clear that the situation here is moving toward an  escalation point.
Today at one o’clock a low flying helicopter flew over the ridge line  and crossed the river a couple kilomoters south of the bridge. It  followed a route that corresponds to the path of the proposed PTP  pipeline, then circled back and flew in a northern direction following  the river toward Houston. They flew low enough to take photos of  activity happening at bridge and our camp. Read the rest of this entry