Blog Archives

Decolonizing Medicine: Physical, Social and Mental Healing

BLACKFOOT MEDICINE MAN. Blackfoot Medicine Man Performing His Mysteries over a Dying Man. Oil on canvas, 1832, by George Catlin.

BLACKFOOT MEDICINE MAN. Blackfoot Medicine Man Performing His Mysteries over a Dying Man. Oil on canvas, 1832, by George Catlin.

by Camaray Devalos, Indian Country Today,  Dec 23, 2014

de·col·o·nize – verb (of a country) withdraw from (a colony), leaving it independent.

I notice a lot of talk on “decolonizing.” We must decolonize, people say. HashtagDecolonize. Street art murals with a Native woman standing proud with the word “decolonize” defiantly scrawled on the bottom. I knew the dictionary version, and I liked the idea of it. It’s a challenging, powerful word. But as an Indigenous person, I didn’t know how to apply it to my everyday life. How are we supposed to withdraw from colonization when it permeates through our entire way of life, and has been doing so since colonists stepped foot onto the New World? How does an entire group of people literally withdraw from a colony?

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Guts and Grease: The Diet of Native Americans

Buffalo hunting 1by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, PhD, Westonaprice.org

The hunter-gatherer’s dinner is front page news these days. Drawing from the writings of Dr. Boyd Eaton and Professor Loren Cordain, experts in the so-called Paleolithic diet, columnists and reporters are spreading the word about the health benefits of a diet rich in protein and high in fiber from a variety of plant foods 1,2. It’s actually amusing to see what the modern food pundits come up with as examples of the “Paleolithic Prescription.” Jean Carper offers a Stone Age Salad of mixed greens, garbanzo beans, skinless chicken breast, walnuts and fresh herbs, mixed with a dressing made of orange juice, balsamic vinegar and canola oil.3 Elizabeth Somer suggests wholewheat waffles with fat-free cream cheese, coleslaw with nonfat dressing, grilled halibut with spinach, grilled tofu and vegetables over rice, nonfat milk, canned apricots and mineral water, along with prawns and clams. Her Stone Age food pyramid includes plenty of plant foods, extra lean meat and fish, nonfat milk products, and honey and eggs in small amounts.4 Read the rest of this entry

American Indians are embracing the ‘decolonized diet’

Daniel King and Reike Blue Arm worked on their plot of vegetables on the Little Earth community garden in south Minneapolis.

Daniel King and Reike Blue Arm worked on their plot of vegetables on the Little Earth community garden in south Minneapolis.

by Allie Shah, Star Tribune, September 2, 2014

Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth is growing.

So, too, is a movement among American Indians in Minnesota and elsewhere to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.

Far from access to natural maple syrup, wild rice and game available Up North, the residents at Little Earth of United Tribes — a south Minneapolis low-income housing complex — are finding new old ways to grow crops that existed long before European settlers arrived.

Some adherents even have a name for this concept: the decolonized diet.

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