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Ottawa to announce settlement with Indigenous survivors of Sixties Scoop

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Sixties Scoop survivors and supporters gather for a demonstration at a Toronto courthouse on Aug. 23, 2016. (Michelle Siu/Canadian Press)

Thousands of First Nations children placed in non-Indigenous care to be compensated

By John Paul Tasker, CBC News, October 5, 2017

Crown-Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett will announce a financial settlement with survivors of the Sixties Scoop tomorrow, CBC News has confirmed.

The Canadian Press reported Thursday that survivors would receive some $800 million as compensation, or between $25,000 and $50,000 for each claimant. CBC could not independently confirm that figure. Read the rest of this entry

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Ontario judge sides with Sixties Scoop survivors

Indigenous practice from New Zealand aims to reunite kids in care with families

New Zealander Katie Murray is in Winnipeg to share knowledge about a promising approach that aims to keep children at risk of being apprehended by foster care in their own extended families. (Provided by Katie Murray.)

New Zealander Katie Murray is in Winnipeg to share knowledge about a promising approach that aims to keep children at risk of being apprehended by foster care in their own extended families. (Provided by Katie Murray.)

Delegation in Winnipeg to help Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre Inc. keep kids in their own families

By Chris Read, CBC News, Nov 9, 2015

A delegation from New Zealand is in Winnipeg to share an approach they believe could reduce the number of children in foster care.

It’s called Family Group Conferencing (FGC) and it’s based on the practices of New Zealand’s indigenous Maori people.

Katie Murray is the CEO of a social service agency on the North Island of New Zealand and she is here to liaise with Winnipeg’s Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre Inc. Read the rest of this entry

BC Premier’s office site of native protest over child welfare

 Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian and Chief Stewart Phillip of the B.C. Indian Chief's Union speak to a small crowd of protesters Tuesday outside B.C. Premier Christy Clark's office in West Kelowna. Contributed/ Global Okanagan


Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian and Chief Stewart Phillip of the B.C. Indian Chief’s Union speak to a small crowd of protesters Tuesday outside B.C. Premier Christy Clark’s office in West Kelowna.
Contributed/ Global Okanagan

, Global News, Oct 13, 2015

WEST KELOWNA, B.C. – Protesters gathered at Premier Christy Clark’s constituency office Tuesday afternoon in support of aboriginal child welfare rights.

About 50 members of Okanagan aboriginal communities, including the Splatsin Nation from Enderby, chanted and drummed at the protest. They are concerned about the province taking care of their children instead of being care for by First Nations. Read the rest of this entry

Sixties Scoop victims demand apology, compensation

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Some estimate more than 20,000 aboriginal kids adopted by mostly non-native families

CBC News, June 18, 2015

Aboriginal adoptees forced from their families by the Canadian government in the Sixties Scoop are expected to receive what is believed to be the first public government apology on Thursday.

Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger is set to deliver the apology, which the province has been working on for months alongside affected adoptees.

The Sixties Scoop is the name given to the period of time between the 1960s and ’80s when thousands of aboriginal children were placed with mostly non-native adoptive families. Read the rest of this entry

Sixties Scoop: ‘They just wanted to remove an Indian child into a white home’

Art by Tania Willard, Secwepemc.

Art by Tania Willard, Secwepemc.

By Chinta Puxley, The Canadian Press/CBC News, June 17, 2015

Child welfare agents took Christine Merasty from her mother’s arms shortly after her birth at a hospital on Christmas Day in 1970.

It was supposed to be a six-month arrangement to allow her mother — a residential school survivor — to get her life together after living on the streets of downtown Winnipeg.

But child-welfare workers were already showing the infant’s picture to prospective white families for adoption. Christine was taken to her new home in the rural Manitoba town of Bowsman when she was four months old.

“They didn’t give my family a chance. They just wanted to remove an Indian child into a white home,” Merasty says. “That wasn’t right. I had a family searching for me for 20 years, wanting me. They would have wanted me in 1970.”

It was called the Adopt Indian Metis program. Today it’s referred to as the Sixties Scoop. Read the rest of this entry