Blog Archives

Indigenous People in Guatemala in Protests that Lead to Resignation of President

Indigenous protesters hold a sign saying "no more corruption" in Guatemala City, August 2015. Photo: Reuters

Indigenous protesters hold a sign saying “no more corruption” in Guatemala City, August 2015. Photo: Reuters

by Rick Kearns, Indian Country Today, Sept 25, 2015

Indigenous people in Guatemala were in the front lines of anti-government protests in late August, just a week before the resignation of President Otto Perez Molina on September 2. Perez Molina was then arrested on charges that he participated in a multi-million dollar fraud scheme.

But indigenous activists, along with tens of thousands of other Guatemalans, had been protesting against many of his policies since the Spring, which culminated in three days of non-stop protests from August 25-27.

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In Guatemala, Indigenous Communities Prevail Against Monsanto

In Sololá, hundreds of campesinos mobilized to oppose the "Monsanto Law," which would have opened Guatemala to the privatization of seed. (Photo: Jeff Abbott)

In Sololá, hundreds of campesinos mobilized to oppose the “Monsanto Law,” which would have opened Guatemala to the privatization of seed. (Photo: Jeff Abbott)

By Jeff Abbott, Truth Out, Nov 12, 2014

Late in the afternoon of September 4, after nearly 10 days of protests by a coalition of labor, indigenous rights groups and farmers, the indigenous peoples and campesinos of Guatemala won a rare victory. Under the pressure of massive mobilizations, the Guatemala legislature repealed Decree 19-2014, commonly referred to as the “Monsanto Law,” which would have given the transnational chemical and seed producer a foot hold into the country’s seed market.

“The law would have affected all indigenous people of Guatemala,” said Edgar René Cojtín Acetún of the indigenous municipality of the department of Sololá. “The law would have privatized the seed to benefit only the multinational corporations. If we didn’t do anything now, then our children and grandchildren would suffer the consequences.” Read the rest of this entry

Guatemala: Police Violently Evict the La Puya Mining Resistance

Riot cops eventually succeeded in moving in heavy machinery for the mining corporation.

Riot cops eventually succeeded in moving in heavy machinery for the mining corporation.

By James Rodríguez, Vice,

Since March 2012, hundreds of local community members from San José del Golfo and San Pedro Ayampuc, Guatemala, have peacefully blocked the entrance to US-based Kappes, Cassiday & Associates’ El Tambor gold mine. Locals argue the industrial project will consume their already short supplies of water and believe there was no appropriate consultation process regarding the installation of the mine. Read the rest of this entry