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B.C. chiefs show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

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Unist’ot’en camp founder and spokesperson Freda Huson at a gathering of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and supportive chiefs from around B.C. outside of the Coastal GasLink pipeline route. Over 200 were in the Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre in Smithers to hear speeches ahead of a march. (Chris Gareau photo)

Chiefs from around B.C. outside the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in Smithers show support.

by Chris Gareau, Interior News, Jan. 16, 2019

Chiefs from the B.C. coast, Interior and Northwest converged in Smithers to show support for the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs’ opposition to the Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline. Read the rest of this entry

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Pipeline Investment ‘Goes Palliative’ in Wake of Unist’ot’en Blockade

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Tripod erected at entrance to Unist’ot’en camp, January 2019. Photo: Facebook

The Energy Mix, Jan 14, 2019

Two separate news outlets are declaring the end of pipeline investment in Canada, while several focus in on the differences in jurisdiction between elected and hereditary First Nations chiefs, in the wake of last week’s RCMP raid and subsequent “peaceful resolution” of the Unist’ot’en blockade along TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink fracked gas pipeline in British Columbia. Read the rest of this entry

This pipeline is challenging Indigenous law and Western law. Who really owns the land?

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First Nations leaders meet with RCMP at the Unist’ot’en camp near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. Photo: Jimmy Jeong/The Globe and Mail

Pipeline owners say they have consent, but Wet’suwet’en leaders are divided

With members of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation blockading a pipeline project on their traditional lands, Na’moks was standing by a crackling campfire, next to an RCMP checkpoint, drawing in the snow with his right boot.

The hereditary chief of the Tsayu clan made a small circle to represent the authority of elected band councils within reserves. Outside that circle, he explained, is where Wet’suwet’en clans wield power over a vast territory.

“We are hereditary chiefs,” he said, “and we have control of this land.” Read the rest of this entry

Deal reached in northern British Columbia pipeline impasse

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Solidarity rally in Ottawa on Jan 8, 2019. Photo: Facebook

by Amy Smart, The Canadian Press, January 10, 2019

SMITHERS, B.C. — Hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation have reached a deal with the RCMP to allow a natural gas company access across a bridge that had been blocked in their territory.

Following several hours of meetings, Chief Na’Moks told reporters Thursday that the agreement is between the chiefs and the RCMP to ensure the safety of the First Nation’s members after 14 arrests were made on Monday when a court injunction was enforced by police. Read the rest of this entry

Haida strip two hereditary chiefs of titles for supporting Enbridge

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Darin Swanson, head chief of the Yahgulaanaas/Janaas clan at the ceremony where two hereditary chiefs were stripped of their titles. Ernest Swanson, his nephew is to the left holding a staff. Mary Helmer / For PNG

by Jeff Lee, Vancouver Sun, August 17, 2016

The extraordinary decision by a Haida clan to strip two of its hereditary chiefs of their titles for secretly supporting the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline is being closely watched by First Nations across Canada.

The rebuke, delivered last week in an elaborate ceremony witnessed by more than 500 people, came as the Haida Nation rejected what they say is a growing trend by companies to enlist the support of hereditary chiefs as a way of claiming broad First Nations support. Read the rest of this entry

Lelu Island hereditary chiefs respond to Prince Rupert Port Authority

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Indigenous leaders gather on Lelu island where the Lax Kw’alaams First Nation has set up camp to protest the construction of the Petronas LNG terminal. Photograph: SkeenaWatershed Coalition

The hereditary chiefs of Lelu Island have responded to a Prince Rupert Port Authority demand they halt construction.

Simoyget Yahaan Donnie Wesley Gwishawaal Ken Lawson responded with an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Read the rest of this entry

Video: Hereditary Chiefs visit Unist’ot’en Territory

https://www.youtube.com/embed/7ppefUXtBxg“>

by UnistotenCamp, posted to Youtube on Sept 5, 2015

Thursday, September 3, 2015
Hereditary chiefs of all five Wet’suwet’en clans come to Unist’ot’en Yintah to show their unanimous support for the work Unist’ot’en are doing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ppefUXtBxg