Blog Archives

SALMON LIVING ON BORROWED TIME

​Toxic algae and drought conditions in Klamath Basin threaten salmon survival.

​Toxic algae and drought conditions in Klamath Basin threaten salmon survival.

Salmon need water not politics

For Immediate Release, August 13, 2015

Klamath Basin, Oregon – Salmon and the largest dam removal project are still being held hostage as a bargaining tool to get legislation passed for Senate Bill 133.  Over 50 tribes have advocated against S. 133 the Klamath Basin Water Recovery and Economic Restoration Act of 2015 also known as the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA). In an effort to support tribal rights and sovereignty tribes have wrote letters advocating against the KBRA. Senator Murkowski of Alaska wrote a letter in reply. Murkowski assured tribes she understands the concerns of tribal sovereignty as it relates to S. 133. Murkowski’s letter also ensures tribes that the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will be fully consulted if S. 133 was to advance that far. Read the rest of this entry

Dissenting Tribal Voices Locked Out of Klamath Land Transfer Discussion

Klamath_RiverDespite Years of Inaction and Major Revisions, Klamath Tribes Chairman Refuses to Revisit Water Agreement

Chiloquin, Ore — Klamath Tribes Chairman Don Gentry released a letter to Klamath Tribes members June 3rd stating that, despite substantial changes to the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA), the General Council who is the governing body of the Klamath Tribes, would not be given any opportunity to revisit or revise its position. The KBRA was approved with only approximately 20% participation from voting tribal members, and support for the agreement has declined significantly since the last vote in 2014. The loss of the Mazama Forest, outlined in the original KBRA, has been seen as an opportunity to revisit the tribe’s involvement in the KBRA. Read the rest of this entry

Klamath Tribal Members Refuse to Support Water Settlement

Klamath people in dug out canoes, 19th century. Photo: Wikipedia.

Klamath people in dug out canoes, 19th century. Photo: Wikipedia.

March 31, 2015 (Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon)

All across the United States, on the west coast in particular, Indian water settlements are taking place at a rampant rate. The Bureau of Reclamation, a branch of the Department of the Interior, is securing water reserves for the best interest of the United States, predominately the industrialized agricultural economy.

Though recent statements made by agricultural parties have been to support water agreements because farmers help “feed the world”, the truth is the meat raised specifically in the Klamath Basin does not feed the local community, adds to the carbon footprint and degrades Indigenous habitat utilized for cultural, spiritual and substance purposes. Read the rest of this entry

Sacred Water, Klamath People and the Struggle for Cultural Survival

Klamath wildlife refuge 1

Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Wikipedia.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Sacred Water, Klamath People and the Struggle for Cultural Survival

February 25, 2015 (Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon)

Entangled in the heart of an arduous century long battle over water rights in the Upper Klamath Basin, is the struggle of the Klamath, Modoc, Yahooskin Peoples for cultural survivance.

Our elders have always told us that water is life, water is priceless. Our water is so sacred it should never be quantified, compromised or negotiated.
But what happens to the future of a culture, whose spiritual foundation is water, when even to tribal negotiators, the priceless becomes a mere commodity? Read the rest of this entry