Blog Archives

$40B LNG project in northern B.C. gets go-ahead

Lelu Island colour.jpgLNG Canada chief executive says it will move ‘immediately’ into construction

Construction is going ahead on a massive, $40-billion liquefied natural gas project in northern B.C., hours after five primary investors from five different countries granted their approval for the joint venture.

The LNG Canada project will see a pipeline carrying natural gas from Dawson Creek in northeastern B.C. to a new processing plant on the coast in Kitimat. There, the gas would be liquefied for overseas export. Read the rest of this entry

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Chevron in talks to sell minority stake in Kitimat LNG project: sources

Chevron gas stationAmong the parties in talks with Chevron for a possible stake in the Canadian LNG project are Petronas, the sources said

by John Tilak, Ernest Scheyder and David French, Financial Post,

TORONTO/HOUSTON — Chevron Corp is exploring options including the sale of a minority stake in its Canadian liquefied natural gas (LNG) project as it pushes ahead, three people familiar with the matter told Reuters. Read the rest of this entry

LNG Canada to start moving into Haisla Centre

Haisla LNG building

LNG Canada executive committee and Haisla Nation Council members following a walk-through of the Haisla Centre in May. Photo Cameron Orr

The units will only be for accommodating existing staff members

Gerry Leibel, Northern Sentinel, June 21, 2017

LNG Canada staff will this summer move into the recently completed Haisla Centre in Kitimat.

Haisla Nation Communications Co-ordinator Cameron Orr said LNG Canada holds a 10-year lease for the building, which was signed between the Haisla Nation Council and LNG Canada in 2015. Read the rest of this entry

Royal Dutch Shell casts fresh doubt on B.C. LNG project due to funding

Shell skullby Yadullah Hussain, Financial Post, May 5, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc. has cast doubts its liquefied natural gas export project in British Columbia will secure a final investment decision (FID) by the end of this year, further dashing the province ’s hopes of shipping LNG by 2020.

Shell’s LNG Canada in Kitimat is competing for funding dollars with two other company LNG projects, both in the United States, as well as with a chemicals plant in Pennsylvania, within the next 12 months, chief financial officer Simon Henry told investors during a conference call Wednesday. Read the rest of this entry

Shell’s Kitimat LNG proposal is first to get key permit

lng-canada-kitimat-project

This rendering of the proposed project shows two of the LNG trains. (LNG Canada/flickr)

Joint venture is made up of Shell Canada, affiliates of PetroChina, Korea Gas and Mistubishi

By Laura Kane, The Canadian Press, Jan 6, 2016

A joint venture company led by Shell has obtained the first permit to build a liquefied natural gas export facility in northern British Columbia, but the company has yet to make a final commitment to go ahead with the project. Read the rest of this entry

Kitimat residents vote no on Northern Gateway

Kitimat mayor flash mobbed by ‘No Enbridge’ protesters at Haisla basketball game

Read the rest of this entry

Haisla First Nation retreat from Gateway opposition

Nathan VanderKlippe, The Globe and Mail, Dec. 05 2012

Haisla band council chief Ellis Ross (centre).

Haisla band council chief Ellis Ross (centre).

The Haisla First Nation has pulled out of an organization that has ardently fought the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and called for greener practices in the export of natural gas.
The Haisla said they have withdrawn from Coastal First Nations, amid a debate among aboriginal groups about the environmental impact of West Coast industrial development that has now blown out into the open. The move comes as the Haisla shift their position on oil exports from their traditional territory, which some see as evidence that opposition to Gateway is beginning to wane. Read the rest of this entry

Haisla Legal Struggle Against Enbridge

How First Nations Are Gearing Up for Legal Battle Against Gateway
Native groups likely to cite evidence they weren’t consulted as required by Supreme Court decisions

By Geoff Dembicki, January 30, 2012, TheTyee.ca
On Sept. 28, 2011, Enbridge appears to have made an extraordinary offer of peace to several of its most dedicated opponents.
The scene was a Coastal First Nations board meeting on Granville Street in downtown Vancouver. That alliance of native communities nestled in coves and inlets along B.C.’s jagged north coast had agreed to host Enbridge CEO Pat Daniel and three other senior company officials.
Relations between the Calgary-based pipeline giant and Coastal First Nations leaders were not exactly warm. Read the rest of this entry