Blog Archives

Lakota Strong Heart Warrior Society Statement on Dakota Access Pipeline Injunction Decision and Nationhood

Video: What’s happening in North Dakota?

Don’t know what #NODAPL means or what the Dakota Access Pipeline is or what all those indigenous warriors on horses are doing in North Dakota? Well this little primer will get you up to speed.

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Indigenous energy bar takes off in U.S., soon to hit Canada

Tanka Bar owners

Karlene Hunter and Mark Tilsen are the owners of Native American Natural Foods, a company based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that makes the energy bars that are made of buffalo and cranberries. (The Associated Press/Chet Brokaw )

It’s a small company ‘with a huge mission,’ says president of Native American Natural Foods

By Stephanie Cram, CBC News, August 23, 2016

An energy bar produced by an Indigenous company is taking the U.S. natural food market by storm, and will soon hit shelves here in Canada. Tanka bars combine buffalo meat and dried fruit — a combination which might surprise some, but has been a staple dish in First Nation diets since before colonization.  Read the rest of this entry

Pipeline Fighters Set Up Spirit Camp to Block Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline

Dakota Access pipeline horses 1

Photo by LaDonna Bravebull Allard, Last REal Indians.

by Matt Remle, Last Real Indians, April 1, 2016

On April 1st, hundreds gathered in Ft. Yates on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation to show opposition to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, also known as the Bakken pipeline.

the Dakota Access Pipeline threatens public health and welfare on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe relies on the waters of the life-giving Missouri River for our continued existence, and the Dakota Access Pipeline poses a serious risk to Mni Sose and to the very survival of our Tribe.” Standing Rock Sioux Tribe resolution opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline. Read the rest of this entry

Tribal Citizens Rise Up Against Bakken Oil Pipeline

Sioux Spirit Camp

Rosebud Sioux Spirit Camp.

March 29th, 2016

Spirit Camp Press Contact:

Tribal Citizens Rise Up Against Bakken Oil Pipeline
Horse Ride and Spiritual Camp To Be Held Along Proposed Route of Dakota Access Pipeline

Cannonball, SD – On April 1st, 2016, tribal citizens of the Standing Rock Lakota Nation and ally Lakota, Nakota, & Dakota citizens, under the group name “Chante tin’sa kinanzi Po” will have a Horse Ride to celebrate the founding of a Spirit Camp that will be erected along the proposed route of the bakken oil pipeline, Dakota Access. This camp will be called Iŋyaŋ Wakȟáŋaǧapi Othí, translated as Sacred Rock, the original name of the Cannonball area. The Spirit Camp is dedicated to stopping and raising awareness of the Dakota Access pipeline,  the dangers associated with pipeline spills and the necessity to protect the water resources of the Missouri river. Read the rest of this entry

Video: Liberation Day 2016 – Wounded Knee

Posted to Vimeo by  Unicorn Riot, Feb 29, 2016

Denver Police Shoot, Kill Mentally Ill Native American Man; Family Demands Justice

Paul Castaway, shot and killed by Denver Police Department officer.

Paul Castaway, shot and killed by Denver Police Department officer.

Simon Moya-Smith, Indian Country Today, July 15, 2015

As many as 100 people marched through the streets of Denver on Tuesday to protest the death of a mentally ill Native American man who was shot multiple times by police late Sunday.

A Denver police officer, whose name has not been released, shot Paul Castaway, 35, four times in the torso after officers said Castaway had gotten “dangerously close” with a knife, The Denver Post reported.

Castaway’s mother, Lynn Eagle Feather, who is Sicangu Lakota, told ICTMN that she had called the police on Sunday because her son, who suffered from schizophrenia, was experiencing an episode that evening, and that she sought help getting him back under control. Eagle Feather said she told the 9-1-1 operator that her son was mentally ill. Read the rest of this entry

Hunting the Rock with Steve Sitting Bear

Steve Sitting Bear's son learns to use a bow at a young age. Photo courtesy Steve Sitting Bear.

Steve Sitting Bear’s son learns to use a bow at a young age. Photo courtesy Steve Sitting Bear.

by Chelsey Luger, Indian Country Today, June 24, 2015

“Hunting is the most basic, yet most important survival skill we must possess. It’ll be the most primitive of hunters who will survive and carry on our species when the resources are gone and western culture collapses. It is our duty as humans beings to carry on these skills. Steve Sitting Bear, founder of Hunting the Rock”

Hunting has been central to Native cultures and people since the beginning of time. There’s no question that the act of providing and preparing food for one’s family and community is an integral aspect of traditional culture and community wellness. But these days, some of these skills have been forgotten or lost.  In some places, hunting has turned into more of a sport about bragging rights than a means to provide. But on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, a program called “Hunting the Rock” is helping kids on the rez relearn and remember a more respectful approach to these ways.

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Excessive force used in death of Lakota man

Jerry Capps, Rapid City, comforts his wife, Jaylene, as she grieves, touching the star quilt on the casket of her son, Christopher J. Capps, 22, during burial ceremonies on May 7, 2010. at Mountain View Cemetery, Rapid City. Photo by Randall Howell

Jerry Capps, Rapid City, comforts his wife, Jaylene, as she grieves, touching the star quilt on the casket of her son, Christopher J. Capps, 22, during burial ceremonies on May 7, 2010. at Mountain View Cemetery, Rapid City. Photo by Randall Howell

Court ruling opens door for lawsuit
By Ernestine Chasing Hawk, Native Sun News, April 2, 2015 (via Indianz.com)

RAPID CITY –– “The cop murdered my son,” Jerry Capps told Native Sun News in May of 2010 shortly after his son Christopher Capps died from five gunshot wounds fired by Pennington County Deputy David Olson. The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals has just confirmed the distraught father’s suspicions, that Olson used excessive force in the death of his son and violated his constitutional rights.

“I told the cop ‘you shot my son because he was brown,’” the father had said in 2010. “There was no reason for this … no reason at all.” Now the appeals court decision opens the way for the parents of Christopher Capps, Jerry and Jaylene Capps to file a wrongful death lawsuit against the officer. The Appellate Court judges ruled that the first shot fired against Capps hit him in the back, supporting evidence he was running away from the officer. Read the rest of this entry

Protesters march on Rapid City Hall for racial equality

People take to the streets in Rapid City, South Dakota to protest racism, Feb 26, 2015.

People take to the streets in Rapid City, South Dakota to protest racism, Feb 26, 2015.

In frigid, windy but sunny conditions, more than 100 protesters Thursday marched on the Rapid City-School Administration Center downtown as part of a movement calling for government accountability to resolve social injustices toward Native Americans.

The Thursday march coincided with the release a 12-page report by the Lakota People’s Law Project, “Native Lives Matter,” which asserts the U.S. justice system is responsible for those injustices.

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