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B.C. chiefs show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

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Unist’ot’en camp founder and spokesperson Freda Huson at a gathering of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and supportive chiefs from around B.C. outside of the Coastal GasLink pipeline route. Over 200 were in the Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre in Smithers to hear speeches ahead of a march. (Chris Gareau photo)

Chiefs from around B.C. outside the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in Smithers show support.

by Chris Gareau, Interior News, Jan. 16, 2019

Chiefs from the B.C. coast, Interior and Northwest converged in Smithers to show support for the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs’ opposition to the Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline. Read the rest of this entry

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This pipeline is challenging Indigenous law and Western law. Who really owns the land?

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First Nations leaders meet with RCMP at the Unist’ot’en camp near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. Photo: Jimmy Jeong/The Globe and Mail

Pipeline owners say they have consent, but Wet’suwet’en leaders are divided

With members of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation blockading a pipeline project on their traditional lands, Na’moks was standing by a crackling campfire, next to an RCMP checkpoint, drawing in the snow with his right boot.

The hereditary chief of the Tsayu clan made a small circle to represent the authority of elected band councils within reserves. Outside that circle, he explained, is where Wet’suwet’en clans wield power over a vast territory.

“We are hereditary chiefs,” he said, “and we have control of this land.” Read the rest of this entry

Deal reached in northern British Columbia pipeline impasse

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Solidarity rally in Ottawa on Jan 8, 2019. Photo: Facebook

by Amy Smart, The Canadian Press, January 10, 2019

SMITHERS, B.C. — Hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation have reached a deal with the RCMP to allow a natural gas company access across a bridge that had been blocked in their territory.

Following several hours of meetings, Chief Na’Moks told reporters Thursday that the agreement is between the chiefs and the RCMP to ensure the safety of the First Nation’s members after 14 arrests were made on Monday when a court injunction was enforced by police. Read the rest of this entry

Injunction extended to all LNG blockades south of Houston

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Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs at the Gitdumden checkpoint on Tuesday, Dec 18, 2018. Twitter photo

New Gitdumden Morice River Forest Service Rd checkpoint in area Coastal GasLink can access.

by Chris Gareau, Interior News, Dec. 21, 2018

The interim injunction applied to the Unist’ot’en (Dark House) blockade at its camp now applies to the Gitdumden checkpoint built Dec. 17 by members of the neighbouring clan, according to a spokesperson for Coastal Gaslink. Read the rest of this entry

Clans join together to block LNG from Unist’ot’en territory

After a judged approved an injunction against the Unist’ot’en for blocking the Morice River Bridge, other Wet’suwet’en clans have stepped in.

The blockage has been moved onto Cas Yika territory, a member of the Gidimt’en clan 44 km before Unist’ot’en territory. Read the rest of this entry

Judge rules Uni’stot’en gate must come down for pipeline

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A judge has given the Uni’stot’en Camp 72 hours to dismantle this locked gate across the Morice River bridge. (APTN/Kathleen Martens photo)

by Kathleen Martens, APTN National News, December 15, 2018

An Indigenous camp was ordered Friday to remove a gate that’s blocking a bridge in northwestern B.C. and holding up a multi-billion-dollar gas pipeline project.

Judge Marguerite Church of the B.C. Supreme Court sided with Coastal GasLink, a subsidiary of TransCanada Corp., which filed an injunction to get construction going on the $40-billion LNG Canada build. Read the rest of this entry

Unist’ot’en Camp will have to wait until Friday for injunction decision

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Freda Huson and Warner Naziel outside the courthouse in Prince George, B.C. (Submitted photo)

by Kathleen Martens, APTN National News, December 14, 2018

A B.C. judge has reserved her decision on whether to grant an injunction against members of a Wet’suwet’en clan so the $40-billion LNG Canada project can proceed.

Justice Marguerite Church put the matter over to Friday afternoon, said Warner Naziel of the Unist’ot’en Camp south of Houston, B.C. Read the rest of this entry

$40B LNG project in northern B.C. gets go-ahead

Lelu Island colour.jpgLNG Canada chief executive says it will move ‘immediately’ into construction

Construction is going ahead on a massive, $40-billion liquefied natural gas project in northern B.C., hours after five primary investors from five different countries granted their approval for the joint venture.

The LNG Canada project will see a pipeline carrying natural gas from Dawson Creek in northeastern B.C. to a new processing plant on the coast in Kitimat. There, the gas would be liquefied for overseas export. Read the rest of this entry

Proposed LNG work camp south of Houston, BC

Coastal-GasLink mapApproximately 800 workers would be using the camp if Coastal GasLink pipeline built.

Interior News, Feb. 19, 2018

TransCanada’s Coastal GasLink LNG pipeline is preparing to set up a work camp near Houston that would accommodate approximately 800 workers to support pipeline construction needs.

The Huckleberry Camp would be located approximately 28 kilometres south of Houston. Read the rest of this entry

LNG Canada to start moving into Haisla Centre

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LNG Canada executive committee and Haisla Nation Council members following a walk-through of the Haisla Centre in May. Photo Cameron Orr

The units will only be for accommodating existing staff members

Gerry Leibel, Northern Sentinel, June 21, 2017

LNG Canada staff will this summer move into the recently completed Haisla Centre in Kitimat.

Haisla Nation Communications Co-ordinator Cameron Orr said LNG Canada holds a 10-year lease for the building, which was signed between the Haisla Nation Council and LNG Canada in 2015. Read the rest of this entry