Blog Archives

Industry off the hook for mercury monitoring at mill that poisoned Grassy Narrows First Nation

dryden-mill

Former owners of the paper mill in Dryden, Ont. are not liable for remediation orders from the Ontario government, a court ruled. (Louis-Phillippe Leblanc/Radio-Canada)

Deal struck by Ontario in 1979 to save Dryden mill continues to indemnify Weyerhaeuser, Resolute, court rules

By Jody Porter, CBC News, August 9, 2016

Taxpayers, not industry, will have to pay for environmental monitoring at a pulp mill in Dryden, Ont., infamous for its poisoning of people in two northern Ontario First Nations, according to a recent ruling by an Ontario court. Read the rest of this entry

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Grassy Narrows mercury protesters dump grey liquid at Queen’s Park

Grassy narrows queen-s-park-protest

Protesters dumping a grey sludge in front of Queen’s Park to protest the clean up of Grassy Narrows First Nation in northern Ontario. (Mike Crawley/CBC)

Protesters handcuffed by police, say the substance is corn starch with water and soluble paint

By Nicole Brockbank, CBC News, June 23, 2016

Grassy Narrows mercury poisoning protesters dumped grey liquid in front of Queen’s Park and then were taken into custody by police on Thursday morning.

The spill happened just before 10:30 a.m. in front of the steps to the legislature. Security asked people to move back from the liquid on to the lawn and then police pushed people back further to the south end of the lawn “for safety,” according to officers on scene.  Read the rest of this entry

‘Guilt’ drives former Dryden, Ont. mill worker to reveal his part in dumping toxic mercury

Grassy Narrows map 1Grassy Narrows First Nation concerned hidden mercury dump is the source of on-going contamination

By Jody Porter, CBC News, June 20, 2016

A former employee of the paper mill in Dryden, Ont., has written a letter describing what he says is a hidden dump of dozens of mercury barrels that could be the source of on-going health concerns downstream at Grassy Narrows First Nation.

Mercury contamination from Reed Paper’s chemical plant in Dryden during the 1960s and 70s is a well-studied environmental disaster. Read the rest of this entry

Grassy Narrows First Nation demands cleanup of mercury contamination in northern Ontario

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‘It’s a war zone. I can’t say enough how we need that river to be cleaned up,’ says Judy DaSilva, the environmental health co-ordinator at Grassy Narrows First Nation. ‘Our relatives are dying.’

‘Are our lives worth less?’ Grassy Narrows First Nations Chief Simon Fobister says

By Jody Porter, CBC News, May 31, 2016

The chief of Grassy Narrows First Nation in northern Ontario says mercury dumped in the waterways near his community nearly 60 years ago must be cleaned up.

Simon Fobister made the statement Tuesday, one day after scientists released research showing it is possible to remediate at least some of the lakes and rivers near Grassy Narrows.  Read the rest of this entry

Grassy Narrows First Nation declares emergency over bad water

Graphic: APTN

Graphic: APTN

Uranium, potential cancer-causing agents found in samples, First Nation says

CBC News, Aug 27, 2015

Grassy Narrows First Nation in northern Ontario is declaring a state of emergency on Thursday because no safe drinking water is available in the community.

The First Nation, also known as Asubpeechoseewagong, has been under a boil water advisory for more than a year, but new concerns are emerging about the extent and longevity of the problems. Read the rest of this entry

West Moberly First Nations concerned about mercury contamination in fish

West Moberly First Nation Chief Roland Willson holds a frozen bull trout that he says is contaminated with mercury, in front of the Legislature in Victoria on Monday. (Dirk Meissner/The Canadian Press)

West Moberly First Nation Chief Roland Willson holds a frozen bull trout that he says is contaminated with mercury, in front of the Legislature in Victoria on Monday. (Dirk Meissner/The Canadian Press)

Study by the band concludes 98% of fish have mercury levels above provincial guidelines

By Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press/CBC News, May 12, 2015

Members of the West Moberly First Nations say a hydroelectric dam in northeastern B.C. has left fish in the region too contaminated with mercury to eat.

Chief Roland Willson and members of the McLeod Lake Indian Band, located in northeastern British Columbia, arrived at the legislature in Victoria with more than 90 kilograms of bull trout packed in two coolers.

“Typically, you’d be proud of this fish,” he said. “But we can’t eat this.” Read the rest of this entry