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Province apologizes after wildlife officers seize fish from northern Alberta Métis camp

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A video still showing Alberta Fish and Wildlife officers seizing fish from a Métis camp outside Conklin, just south of Fort McMurray. (Roxy Power/ Submitted)

‘We will take steps to ensure this doesn’t happen again,’ Indigenous Relations Minister says

By David Thurton , CBC News, September 16, 2017

The Alberta government has apologized to a northern Alberta Métis community after wildlife officers confiscated 25 fish from a camp near Christina Lake on Friday.

“This was an unfortunate circumstance,” Indigenous Relations Minister Richard Feehan said in a media release Saturday. Read the rest of this entry

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Activists have held up construction on private property and surprisingly, they have the law on their side.

Winnipeg blockade logging 1

Photo by James Wilt.

by James Wilt, Vice, August 1, 2017

It’s nearly midnight, and a half-dozen Winnipeggers are sitting in the middle of 15-acre clearcut.

Someone occasionally gets up from their lawn chair to feed the campfire with branches from the surrounding area. But everything outside the small circle of light remains silhouetted: the CN rail tracks on one side of the clear cut, massive power lines on the other, the remaining aspen forest behind and a comically large mulching machine a few feet away. Read the rest of this entry

Metis, Off-Reserve Natives Win Indian Status In Supreme Court Ruling

The Supreme Court of Canada has unanimously ruled that Metis and non-status are “Indians” under the Constitution.

“Non-status Indians and Metis are ‘Indians’ under (the Constitution) and it is the federal government to whom they can turn,” the unanimous 9-0 ruling said.

The high court was also asked to rule on whether the federal government has the same responsibility to them as to status Indians and Inuit.

Read the rest of this entry

Métis rights case finally before Supreme Court of Canada

In 1999, prominent Métis leader Harry Daniels started the landmark Métis and non-status Indian rights case that is before the Supreme Court Thursday. Daniels died in 2004. (Métis Council of Prince Edward Island)

In 1999, prominent Métis leader Harry Daniels started the landmark Métis and non-status Indian rights case that is before the Supreme Court Thursday. Daniels died in 2004. (Métis Council of Prince Edward Island)

It took 16 years to get the case heard by the high court

By Karina Roman, CBC News, Oct 8, 2015

A much anticipated court case about Métis and non-status Indian rights is finally before the Supreme Court of Canada Thursday, 16 years after the legal wrangling began.

The top court is being asked to determine whether the approximately 200,000 Métis and 400,000 non-status Indians in Canada have the right to be treated as “Indians” under the Constitution Act and fall under federal jurisdiction.

Métis and non-status Indians argue that because neither the provinces nor Ottawa have been willing to accept jurisdiction, they have fallen through the cracks. Read the rest of this entry