Blog Archives

Mexico’s Zapatista rebels, 24 years on and defiant in mountain strongholds

Zapatista lined up

Members of the Zapatista national liberation army (EZLN) in La Garrucha, Chiapas, stand in front of a mural showing the revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata. Photograph: Eduardo Verdugo/AP

The peasant rebels took up arms in 1994, and now number 300,000 in centres with their own doctors, teachers and currency, but rarely answer questions – until now

by John Vidal, The Guardian,

Diners in the Tierradentro cafe in the southern Mexican town of San Cristóbal de las Casas can choose between a variety of omelettes. The “Liberty” has the most ingredients, the “Democracy” looks the best, but the “Justice” costs the most – possibly because it comes with cheese. Read the rest of this entry

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Rebellion Spreads in Mexico After a Police Massacre

oaxaca-resists“We will not pardon or forget.”

Mexican Army Attacks Against Indigenous Communities of Ostula

Photo: Semeí Verdía via Quadratin archives

Photo: Semeí Verdía via Quadratin archives

by Revolution News, July 20, 2015

The indigenous communities of Santa Maria Ostula have denounced 3 separate attacks by the Mexican army that occurred yesterday in the municipality of Aquila, Michoacán state. The attacks resulted in the death of one child, 3 others injured (2 minors) along with arrests of several members of the indigenous community and the leader of the Aquila autodefensas group, Semeí Verdía, who was the target of the Army operation.

The events began Sunday [July 19, 2015] morning around 10 AM when the Mexican Army conducted an operation to arrest the leader of local autodefensas group, Semeí Verdía, in the village of La Placita. The Army appeared at the same time at El Duin and Xayakalan, sites where the community police forces maintain checkpoints. Read the rest of this entry

Report: The First Worldwide Festival of Resistance in Mexico

Celebrating the Global Fight Against Capitalism in Mexico: Where There is Destruction From Above We Will Rebuild From Below

From December 21, 2014 through January 3, 2015 some 2,600 people from 48 countries (2,050 from Mexico and 550 from other countries) gathered for the first Worldwide Festival of Resistances Against Capitalism.

The festival took place all over Mexico and the majority of participants travelled together in a mass caravan of buses (not without mechanical problems and police interference) to the different regions to share and listen stories and strategies of resistance, to strengthen their cultures of resistance, and to build lasting networks locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. Thanks to the excellent organizing by EZLN and CNI the impacts of the festival will reverberate amongst the participants and their resistance communities for years to come. Read the rest of this entry

Mexico: Guerrero state HQ torched in demo for missing students

Guerrero state HQ in flames during protests over missing/murdered students.

Guerrero state HQ in flames during protests over missing/murdered students.

, AFP, Oct 13, 2014

Chilpancingo (Mexico) (AFP) – Protesters torched a state government building in southern Mexico in a day of angry demonstrations over the disappearance of 43 students missing since gang-linked police attacked them.

Hundreds of students and teachers ransacked Guerrero state’s sprawling headquarters in the regional capital Chilpancingo, allowing workers to leave before breaking windows and setting a building on fire. Read the rest of this entry

Zapatista Communities Celebrate 20 Years of Self-Government

Zapatistas march on Dec 21, 2012, in Chiapas.

Zapatistas march on Dec 21, 2012, in Chiapas.

by Laura Carlsen, Yes Magazine, Jan 17, 2014

There are two tests of social change movements: endurance and regeneration. After two decades, Mexico’s Zapatista movement can now say it passed both.

Thousands of Zapatistas turned out this month to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 uprising of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN). At the New Year festivities in the five caracoles, or regional centers of Zapatista autonomous government, veterans and adolescents not yet born at the time of the insurrection danced, flirted, shot off rockets, and celebrated “autonomy”—the ideal of self-government that lies at the heart of the Zapatista experience. Read the rest of this entry

Indigenous Self-Defence in Michoacan, Mexico

“Shortly after the 2011 uprising began, community members state that the local politicians and the police simply exiled themselves in fear from the community, warranting no need to run them out of town. Community members took the local government offices, took police trucks, took the polices’ weapons, and put them all to use. Historically, Cheran had traditionally been “policed” or defended by members from the community. In a voluntary rotation members from each of the four “barrios” or neighborhoods would patrol the community for self-defense in what is known as the “community ronda.”” Read the rest of this entry

The Zapatista Army of National Liberation Announces Next Steps

Zapatista patrol
Compañeros and compañeras:
This past December 21, 2012, in the pre-dawn hours, tens of thousands of indigenous Zapatistas mobilized and we took over, peacefully and in silence, 5 municipal seats in the Mexican southeastern state of Chiapas. Read the rest of this entry

Meanwhile, in Mexico: Thousands of Masked Zapatistas March

Zapatistas Dec 21 chiapas 1

Zapatistas: “to be heard, we march in silence”

by Leonidas Oikonomakis on December 21, 2012

The Zapatistas are back! Flowing like the water of the river that beats the sword. And while some were anticipating the Christmas holidays, some others the end of the Maya calendar, and others still the new Communiqué from the Comandancia General of the EZLN that was announced back in November, the main cities of Chiapas woke up today with memories of 1994. Read the rest of this entry

Autonomous indigenous community shuts down illegal logging in Mexico

Earth First! News (from New York Times)

Indigenous people in the Mexican state of Michoacán maintain blockade against illegal logging in their territory.

CHERÁN, Mexico — The woman’s exhausted eyes reflected the flames dancing in front of her. A 38-year-old grandmother, she is also a leader of the civilian insurgency that has taken over this mountain town in the state of Michoacán, 310 miles west of Mexico City. Sixteen months of cold and sleepless nights at Bonfire No. 17, one of a number of permanent burning barricades set up here, have taken their toll.

But like the rest of the residents, she cannot afford to let her guard down. Read the rest of this entry