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Aboriginal mom fights for custody of infant twins in dispute with ministry

Nicolette Moore says just hours after giving birth to twins, the Ministry of Children and Family Development said they would be removed from her care. (Facebook)

Nicolette Moore says just hours after giving birth to twins, the Ministry of Children and Family Development said they would be removed from her care. (Facebook)

Nicolette Moore says she’s been clean and sober for 2 years, but the ministry still took her twin babies

CBC, June 19, 2015

An aboriginal woman from the Nisga’a First Nation is fighting to gain custody of her infant children after she says she turned her life around.

The Ministry of Children and Family Development seized custody of Nicolette Moore’s infant twins this month. Moore says the ministry cited concerns about her past addiction.

“I was told future behaviour is predicted by past behaviour. I honestly don’t know where my past ends and my future begins.” Read the rest of this entry

Sixties Scoop victims demand apology, compensation

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Some estimate more than 20,000 aboriginal kids adopted by mostly non-native families

CBC News, June 18, 2015

Aboriginal adoptees forced from their families by the Canadian government in the Sixties Scoop are expected to receive what is believed to be the first public government apology on Thursday.

Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger is set to deliver the apology, which the province has been working on for months alongside affected adoptees.

The Sixties Scoop is the name given to the period of time between the 1960s and ’80s when thousands of aboriginal children were placed with mostly non-native adoptive families. Read the rest of this entry