Blog Archives

Why Gitxsan built a camp to blockade an LNG pipeline in BC’s north

Participants at the Gitxsan Madii Lii camp.

Participants at the Gitxsan Madii Lii camp.

In their own words from “Camp Madii Lii”

Read the rest of this entry

Fracking B.C for LNG: A Short Note To The Haisla First Nation

Haisla Nation Chief Counsellor Ellis Ross presents BC Premier Christy Clark with a gift to mark the sale of the hospital lands to the First Nation, June 2014.

Haisla Nation Chief Counsellor Ellis Ross presents BC Premier Christy Clark with a gift to mark the sale of the hospital lands to the First Nation, June 2014.  This land is intended for use as an LNG facility.

By Derrick, West Coast Native News,  June 20th, 2014

For 60 years, the Haisla have looked across the channel to see the industrial opportunities that have passed them by. Now with prospect of at least three LNG plants in Kitimat, with the companies and B.C. government inviting them to play a partnership role, the band’s economic future is bright and it seems everyone has a job.

“You just have to look through our community where young people, as young as 25 years old, are buying their first vehicle, brand new, financing,” said Ross. “My daughter is early 20s, she has a mortgage.”

But during a recent visit to Vancouver, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. said the fracking issue needs to be addressed in British Columbia. Mr. Kennedy, senior attorney with the U.S. Natural Resource Defence Council, said many Americans are worried about fracking, and Canadians must also be vigilant about maintaining water quality. Read the rest of this entry

Key native group in Northern B.C. threatens to stop talks on pipelines

Members of the Gitxsan First Nation opposed to the $5.5-billion Enbridge oil pipeline from Alberta to the British Columbia port of Kitimat warm themselves around a fire at a camp outside the Gitxsan Treaty Office in Hazelton, B.C., on Thursday January 12, 2012.

Members of the Gitxsan First Nation opposed to the $5.5-billion Enbridge oil pipeline from Alberta to the British Columbia port of Kitimat warm themselves around a fire at ablockade of the Gitxsan Treaty Office in Hazelton, B.C., on Thursday January 12, 2012.

By Mark Hume, Justine Hunter, The Globe and Mail, April 21, 2014

Another crack has appeared in the government’s energy strategy, with a key native group in northern B.C. threatening “to stop discussions [regarding] any and all proposed pipeline development” in their territory. Read the rest of this entry

Haisla First Nation retreat from Gateway opposition

Nathan VanderKlippe, The Globe and Mail, Dec. 05 2012

Haisla band council chief Ellis Ross (centre).

Haisla band council chief Ellis Ross (centre).

The Haisla First Nation has pulled out of an organization that has ardently fought the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and called for greener practices in the export of natural gas.
The Haisla said they have withdrawn from Coastal First Nations, amid a debate among aboriginal groups about the environmental impact of West Coast industrial development that has now blown out into the open. The move comes as the Haisla shift their position on oil exports from their traditional territory, which some see as evidence that opposition to Gateway is beginning to wane. Read the rest of this entry

Native Bands Oppose Natural Gas Industry in north BC

Fort Nelson band’s anti-fracking petition draws overwhelming Fracking protest signsresponse

MARK HUME, The Globe and Mail, Friday, Nov. 30 2012

When a small native band in British Columbia launched an online petition to oppose increased water use by the gas industry, it was hoping for 500 signatures.

A month later, the Fort Nelson First Nation has nearly 24,000 signatories on the petition and letter to government posted on Change.org under the heading “Don’t Give Away Our Fresh Water for Fracking.” Read the rest of this entry