Blog Archives

Traditional Mi’kmag 1st and 7th District Chiefs oppose Junex projects in Gaspesie, Quebec

by Suzanne Patles & Gary Metallic, The Media Coop, August 24, 2017

Today, we traditional council chiefs from the 1st and the 7th Districts of Mi’kma’ki have gathered at the Junexit Banquet organized by the Camp by the River. We are here not only to support the occupation that has been set up on August 7th against Junex but also to assert our inherent rights and title over our unceded and unsurrendered territory, as affirmed by the 1763 Royal Proclamation. We assert our presence here to protect our territory under the Protection clauses for unceded lands, as protected by Constitutional Rights, Charter Rights, Human Rights, and International Rights. Read the rest of this entry

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Indigenous water protector faces bail hearing arising from Gaspesie anti-fracking blockade

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Surete du Quebec at the site of the blockade during the raid of August 14, 2017.

OTTAWA, AUGUST 18 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
This morning, 10:30am Atlantic time, Anishinaabe water protector and Ottawa resident Fredrick Stoneypoint will receive the decision of judge Denis Paradis’ on whether he will get bail release for the severe charges he is facing.

Stoneypoint has been in custoday since August 14 when Quebec provincial police (‘SQ’) took down an over-a-week-long blockade that was preventing oil/gas company Junex from proceeding on its exploratory fracking activities in the Gaspesie, eastern Quebec.

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Tribal Members in Oklahoma Defeat Natural Gas Pipeline Company

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Two Eagle Dancers by Stephen Mopope, Anadarko, Oklahoma Post Office

Federal court orders removal of natural gas pipeline in Oklahoma for trespassing on original Kiowa Indian lands

The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma has ordered a natural gas pipeline operator to cease operations and remove the pipeline located on original Kiowa Indian lands Anadarko.

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‘I’m standing my ground’: Métis president vows to continue pipeline protest in northern Alberta

A handful of protestors have vowed to continue to block access roads to prevent crews from entering the construction site of a TransCanada natural gas pipeline near Chard in northern Alberta, a protest that has now stretched into its fifth day.

President of the Chard Métis Society, Raoul Montgrand, said despite undertaking consultations with First Nations in the region, the company had not allayed his fears of the pipeline’s route or its impact on his community’s “traditional way of life.”

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Sipekne’katik band prepared for long protest at AltaGas site

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Band member Cheryl Maloney says the sit-in won’t end until the work stops and a court appeal of the environmental permits is completed. (Robert Short/CBC)

‘We’ve started to allow big business to dictate how our environment is going to be,’ resident says

By Paul Palmeter, CBC News, September 29, 2016

Indigenous people and other residents near Stewiacke, N.S., aren’t backing down in their opposition to a Calgary company’s plans for a natural gas storage site in the area.

About a dozen people including Sipekne’katik band members began a sit-in Monday in the area where AltaGas plans to store natural gas in three underground salt caverns near the Shubenacadie River. Read the rest of this entry

Mi’kmaq protesters block entrance at proposed Alton gas storage site

Mi’kmaq set up camp against AltaGas storage facility

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The Canadian Press, September 12, 2016

STEWIACKE, N.S. — The RCMP says it is staying “neutral” as AltaGas Ltd. and Mi’kmaq protesters are at odds over aboriginal presence on a tiny island near the energy company’s proposed underground natural gas storage caverns.

Opponents of the Alton storage project briefly went out Sunday to the small island that formed where the tidal Shubenacadie River meets a channel in which briny water is to be discharged. Read the rest of this entry

Enbridge set to take over most of B.C.’s gas pipelines

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Protest in Comox, BC, against Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline, 2012.

Northern Gateway proponent gets 55% of B.C. gas pipelines and LNG stake in merger

By Betsy Trumpener, CBC News, September 6, 2016

Enbridge, the company behind the controversial Northern Gateway oil sands pipeline project, is set to take over 55 per cent of B.C.’s gas pipelines as well as major gas processing plants.

As part of a merger with Houston-based Spectra announced Tuesday, Enbridge will also take over Spectra’s stake in a major liquified natural gas export proposal.

The Westcoast Connector LNG project proposes piping gas across northern B.C. along a route similar to the one Enbridge Northern Gateway once mapped out to transport crude to oil tankers on B.C.’s North Coast. Read the rest of this entry

Petronas considering Pacific NorthWest LNG delay: Wall Street Journal

Lelu Island boats protest

Warriors disrupt survey work by Petronas subcontractors near Lelu Island.

by Matt Preprost, Alaska Highway News, August 2, 2016

A report from the Wall Street Journal Tuesday morning suggests Petronas could delay a final investment decision on Pacific NorthWest LNG.

Citing two unnamed sources “familiar with the matter,” the Journal says a glut of gas on the world market, coupled with low oil and gas prices has “rendered the project unattractive at the moment.”

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Haisla Nation in tough waiting game as LNG delayed

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Haisla chief councillor Ellis Ross with a view in the background of his community and Douglas Channel in the fall of 2014. At the time, community members had jobs to pick from as preliminary work for potential LNG projects was underway and Rio Tinto was in the midst of a major upgrade project on its aluminum smelter in Kitimat. Now, Haisla members are leaving town to look for work as LNG projects are in limbo and the aluminum plant project is complete. Gordon Hoekstra / Vancouver Sun

by Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun, May 27, 2016

The Haisla Nation, which supports two of the leading proposed major LNG projects in B.C., is in a tough waiting game as the projects remain in limbo.

Activity on both the $25-billion to $40-billion Shell-led LNG Canada project and the $12-billion Chevron-led Kitimat LNG project proposed for the Kitimat area in northwest B.C., where the Haisla claim traditional territory, have slowed to a crawl. Read the rest of this entry