Blog Archives

Okanagan man declares court invalid

A First Nations man accused of smuggling a pair of handguns into Canada at Osoyoos opened his trial Monday by declaring the judge and court has no jurisdiction over him.

Alex Louie — also known as Senk’lip — verbally wrangled with Judge Arne Silverman repeatedly in Penticton court, refusing to enter a plea to each of the nine counts read against him. Read the rest of this entry

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Forget Smokey the Bear: How First Nation fire wisdom is key to megafire prevention

annie-kruger

Annie Kruger was the last firekeeper appointed by her people, say family. Her granddaughter is in training to take over, but has more to learn yet, and the tradition tapered off with Kruger’s death. (Don Gayton)

Fire prevention policies of the past have created conditions for today’s out-of-control blazes, experts say

By Yvette Brend, CBC News, July 15, 2017

The grandchildren of Annie Kruger remember her lighting an Export A Green cigarette, throwing on her logger’s jacket and heading out to set fires near Penticton, B.C.

Before she died she was a firekeeper — as were generations before her in the Okanagan region of the province — and it was her job to use flames to purify the land by setting fire to berry bushes, hillsides and even mountains to renew growth and clear brush and create natural fireguards. Read the rest of this entry

Shuswap band carves canoes for 1st time in 60 years

Secwepemc canoe-carvers

Tanner Francois (L) poses with Frank Marchand (R). Marchand, from the Okanagan Indian Band, is helping members of the Little Shuswap Indian Band — including Francois — carve two canoes. (Doug Herbert/CBC)

‘Being able to be taught to do something my ancestors were doing — it’s like I’m following in their footsteps’

CBC News, March 8, 2017

The Little Shuswap Indian Band in B.C.’s Shuswap region is carving canoes for the first time in over 60 years.

The band partnered with the Okanagan Indian Band to relearn canoe-making skills and every day band members have been working on the shores of Little Shuswap Lake at Quaaout Lodge carving out two large canoes. Read the rest of this entry

Sockeye face ‘catastrophic’ collapse in South Okanagan

A spawning sockeye salmon is seen making its way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

A spawning sockeye salmon is seen making its way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

Only 18,000 sockeye expected to return to B.C.’s South Okanagan

CBC News, July 28, 2015

A potentially catastrophic collapse of the sockeye salmon run is unfolding on the Columbia River system this year.

Scientists once predicted that about 100,000 sockeye would return to spawning grounds in the rivers and streams in British Columbia’s South Okanagan region.

In fact, it was supposed to be one of the largest sockeye runs in recent history, said Okanagan Nation Alliance fish biologist Richard Bussanich. Read the rest of this entry