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Judge bans salmon farm opponents — except independent biologist — from getting too close

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Fish farm protestors in Victoria use Canada Day event to voice opposition

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Rose Henry (left) is joined by a fellow activist and Bobby Arbess (right) as the group voices opposition to fish farms on unceded traditional territories during Canada Day celebrations at the B.C. legislature, Sunday. Kristyn Anthony/VICTORIA NEWS

“We’re here to today to draw attention to the responsibility the federal government has to make true reconciliation happen.”

Kristyn Anthony, Oak Bay News, July 1, 2018

Protestors peacefully voicing their opposition to fish farms in British Columbia crashed Canada Day celebrations on the legislature lawn in Victoria, Sunday.

As thousands of people donned in red and white assembled to take the city’s annual living flag photo, roughly twenty activists took the opportunity to spread their message, sitting before the large audience, chanting. Read the rest of this entry

Dzawada’enuxw First Nation to push for removal of fish farms

fish farm get out banner‘What the Dzawada̱ʼenux̱w require is legal rights now,’ says lawyer representing First Nation

A coastal First Nation in B.C. is vowing to challenge the B.C. government’s new approach to fish farm tenures, which would give First Nations a say over where these operations can set up on the West Coast.

The province announced Wednesday that starting in 2022, fish farms will need First Nations approval to renew their tenures. Read the rest of this entry

B.C. fish farms will require Indigenous consent

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Members of the Kwakwaka’wakw occupy a fish farm in August 2017.

by Justine Hunter, Globe & Mail, June 19, 2018

The B.C. government is poised to give an effective veto to First Nations over fish farm tenures in their territories, a historic concession that reaches beyond the traditional court-ordered requirement that Indigenous groups be consulted and accommodated on resource decisions on their lands. Read the rest of this entry

Federal court dismisses B.C. First Nation’s bid to block fish farm restocking

fish farm demandsCourt said there is ‘likelihood of harm’ from fish-borne disease, but rejected injunction because of timing

Washington state senate bans Atlantic salmon farming in state waters

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Drone footage shows the mangled remains of a net pen near Cypress Island in Washington state that collapsed Aug. 19, 2017, releasing, what a report by state agencies estimates at about 250,000 Atlantic salmon into Pacific waters. (Beau Garreau)

Company that runs state’s net-pen fish farms says it is considering next moves

By Liam Britten, CBC News, March 2, 2018

Washington State senators voted Friday to ban Atlantic salmon farming in state waters.

The passage of the legislation means the state will no longer allow commercial net-pen aquaculture for Atlantic salmon in state waters. Read the rest of this entry

B.C. fish processors spewing potentially dangerous bloodwater into key salmon migration corridor

fish farm processing plant blood

Blood water’ video shows bloody effluent emitting from farmed salmon processing plant, November 28, 2017.

CTV News, November 27, 2017

Salmon farming in British Columbia has long faced controversy, with concerns about fish escapes, antibiotic use, and the spread of viruses and sea lice.

Most of the anger and calls for change have been directed at fish farms, but CTV News has obtained video footage that shows fish processing plants may be contributing to problems as well. Read the rest of this entry

Comment: The science is in — salmon farms need to be out

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A fish farm in Washington State that was damaged and saw tens of thousands of farmed Atlantic Salmon escape, August 2017.

by John Volpe, Times Colonist, November 19, 2017

The salmon-farm debate has come full circle with the recent escape of nearly 200,000 potentially invasive farmed Atlantic salmon 33 kilometres from B.C. waters in Washington state. Read the rest of this entry

Fisheries minister plans ‘concrete’ action to fight declining sockeye run

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A spawning sockeye salmon is seen making its way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

‘I wouldn’t describe it as a conflict of interest,’ says Dominic LeBlanc of DFO promoting aquaculture

By Lisa Johnson and Yvette Brend, CBC News, August 9, 2016

Canada’s minister of fisheries says the government is taking action in a “rigorous and robust” way to restore the Fraser River’s sockeye salmon run after nearly four years of silence following a federal inquiry into the decline of the iconic species.

Dominic LeBlanc said Ottawa is committed to the 75 recommendations that came out of the Cohen Commission of Inquiry in October 2012, agreeing delayed action has been “unacceptable.” Read the rest of this entry