Blog Archives

RCMP on the move to last and longest-standing Wet’suwet’en camp

Trudeau’s remarks to Indigenous leaders delayed by First Nations pipeline protest; thousands rally across country in solidarity with Unis’tot’en

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Trudeau’s cabinet forced to leave, unable to attend their meeting this afternoon at Deifenbaker federal government building because of hundreds occupying this space. Photo: Preethy Sivakumar/Facebook

Trudeau addresses Indigenous forum in Ottawa as First Nations protesters march through city

Video of RCMP raid on Gidumt’en Checkpoint

RCMP force a retreat at Wet’suwet’en barricade

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RCMP Emergency Response Team (ERT) member clambers over barricade erected at Gidimt’en checkpoint on Jan 7, 2019. Photo by Jesse Winter/StarMetro Vancouver

by Perrin Grauer and Jesse Winter, StarMetro Vancouver

MORICE WEST FORESTRY SERVICE ROAD, B.C.—A checkpoint camp was abandoned behind a massive fallen tree and a barrier of flame on Monday afternoon as dozens of RCMP officers finally pushed past the barricade set up to bar entry to the traditional territories of the Wet’suwet’en people.

Fourteen people would be arrested by the end of the day.

The checkpoint, for weeks a movable gate at the mouth of a bridge, had been fortified by the Gidimt’en clan of the Wet’suwet’en nation as the RCMP marshalled in nearby towns over the weekend. Read the rest of this entry

RCMP break down gate at Gidimt’en camp checkpoint; 12 reported arrested

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RCMP including what appear to be Emergency Response Team (ERT) members climbing over main gate at Gidimt’en camp checkpoint Jan 7, 2019.  12 people have been reported arrested. Photo by Michael Toledano.

Coastal GasLink pipeline meant to transport natural gas to coast

RCMP set up ‘exclusion zones’ for public and media as raid on B.C. camps start

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Members of the RCMP Division Liaison Team (DLT) at the Gidumt’en checkpoint on Jan 7, 2019. Photo: facebook

APTN National News, Jan. 7, 2019

The RCMP are setting up exclusion zones and closed roads to the public and media as officers get set to dismantle two camps on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory.

“During the police enforcement operation, temporary exclusion zones and road closures will be established for police and public safety reasons,” said the news release sent out Monday morning that confirmed the RCMP will enforce a court order requested by a pipeline company trying to build a pipeline through Wet’suwet’en territory. Read the rest of this entry

Soaring Eagles: Indigenous teens introduced to policing careers

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Participants in the Soaring Eagle after their graduation ceremony on Aug. 10, 2018, in Edmonton, Alberta. Photo: David Bloom / Postmedia

RCMP ‘sloppy’ and ‘negligent’ in investigating Colten Boushie’s death, say independent experts

Colten Boushie‘The RCMP needs a lot more training,’ said Toronto-based investigator

By David Common, Chelsea Gomez, CBC News, March 6, 2018

Colten Boushie’s family wasn’t entirely surprised last month when a Saskatchewan jury acquitted Gerald Stanley of the murder of the young Cree man.

They had sensed holes in the RCMP investigation from the beginning.

“The RCMP did a botched-up job,” said Debbie Baptiste, Boushie’s mom. “They looked, and then they looked away.” Read the rest of this entry

Emergency measures, military support: Documents reveal heightened concern about Muskrat Falls security

Muskrat Falls transformer truck

The last of seven transformers for the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project rolls through at the gate in late August 2017. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

Military provided lodging, meals as police mobilized in the face of more Muskrat Falls-related protests

By Terry Roberts, CBC News, Feb 1, 2018

The Canadian military quietly assisted during a large deployment of police officers to Labrador in 2017 amid fears of more protests about the controversial Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project. Read the rest of this entry

Racial tension hangs over Sask. as trial for farmer who allegedly killed Indigenous man looms

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Colten Boushie, shot to death in August 2016 by a Saskatchewan farmer.

There are fears that the trial of Gerald Stanley, charged with second-degree murder in the death of Colten Boushie, could inflame racial tensions

by Douglas Quan, National Post, Jan 26, 2018

Asked how nervous he was feeling this week, Ames Leslie, the mayor of Battleford, Sask., was cautious, saying he was hopeful “that cooler minds prevail.”

That’s because on Monday, jury selection is set to begin in one of the highest-profile, racially tinged cases the province has seen: the second-degree murder trial of a white, rural farmer accused of fatally shooting a young Indigenous man. Read the rest of this entry