Blog Archives

North Dakota’s Standing Rock Sioux aren’t backing down to oil pipeline developers

Dakota Access pipeline protests 2by Sarah Aziza, Waging Nonviolence, August 12, 2016

On Thursday, nonviolent protesters outside North Dakota’s Standing Rock Sioux reservation entered their second day of confrontation with private security and local law enforcement. Armed with drums, tribal flags, and cell phones, demonstrators moved to block the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.7 billion dollar crude-oil conduit slated to cut just 1,000 feet from the perimeter of native land. Confrontations began on Wednesday, August 10, when construction crews and private security hired by Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based developers overseeing the pipeline, arrived to break ground. Arrests were made beginning Thursday, as 14 protesters were charged with disorderly conduct and trespassing, while dozens more remained defiantly on site.

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Dakota Access Pipeline Construction Begins Despite Standing Rock Sioux Objections

Dakota Access pipeline rally

Lakota rally against Dakota Access pipeline, April 2016.

Chelsey Luger, Indian Country Today, May 23, 2016

In the midst of an ongoing effort by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other entities to prevent construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the company Dakota Access LLC has begun construction of the 1,150-mile project, which will carry crude oil from western North Dakota to Illinois.

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Pipeline Fighters Set Up Spirit Camp to Block Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline

Dakota Access pipeline horses 1

Photo by LaDonna Bravebull Allard, Last REal Indians.

by Matt Remle, Last Real Indians, April 1, 2016

On April 1st, hundreds gathered in Ft. Yates on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation to show opposition to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, also known as the Bakken pipeline.

the Dakota Access Pipeline threatens public health and welfare on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe relies on the waters of the life-giving Missouri River for our continued existence, and the Dakota Access Pipeline poses a serious risk to Mni Sose and to the very survival of our Tribe.” Standing Rock Sioux Tribe resolution opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline. Read the rest of this entry

Hunting the Rock with Steve Sitting Bear

Steve Sitting Bear's son learns to use a bow at a young age. Photo courtesy Steve Sitting Bear.

Steve Sitting Bear’s son learns to use a bow at a young age. Photo courtesy Steve Sitting Bear.

by Chelsey Luger, Indian Country Today, June 24, 2015

“Hunting is the most basic, yet most important survival skill we must possess. It’ll be the most primitive of hunters who will survive and carry on our species when the resources are gone and western culture collapses. It is our duty as humans beings to carry on these skills. Steve Sitting Bear, founder of Hunting the Rock”

Hunting has been central to Native cultures and people since the beginning of time. There’s no question that the act of providing and preparing food for one’s family and community is an integral aspect of traditional culture and community wellness. But these days, some of these skills have been forgotten or lost.  In some places, hunting has turned into more of a sport about bragging rights than a means to provide. But on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, a program called “Hunting the Rock” is helping kids on the rez relearn and remember a more respectful approach to these ways.

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Native History: Indians Defeat US Army to Protect Bozeman Trail

Painting depicting the Fetterman battle, by JK Ralston.

Painting depicting the Fetterman battle, by JK Ralston.

Jack McNeel, Indian Country Today, Dec 21, 2013

This Date in Native History: On December 21, 1866, the U.S. Army suffered its third largest defeat during the Indian Wars. Only the battle with George Armstrong Custer at Little Bighorn and the 1791 battle between Chief Little Turtle, Miami Tribe, and General St. Clair—where 600 Army men died—were larger. All 81 cavalrymen and infantrymen died in an intense fight that lasted just 40 minutes. Read the rest of this entry