Blog Archives

BC Hydro facing federal order, heavy fines for Site C sediment and erosion problems

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Out of the fog, earth moving equipment keeps going at a steady pace on slope stabilization work in the site preparation for BC Hydro’s Site C dam construction project. Derrick Penner / PNG

by Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun, January 5, 2017

BC Hydro is facing a federal order as early as Friday and potential fines of up to $400,000 due to erosion and sediment problems at the $9-billion Site C dam project in the province’s northeast.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has issued Hydro with a “notice of intent” to proceed with enforcement action unless the provincial Crown corporation provides assurances that problems are being addressed. Read the rest of this entry

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Why B.C.’s Site C dam could become a national issue

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Opponents of the $8.8 billion dam hope this week’s federal court case marks a tipping point

By Justin McElroy, CBC News, September 11, 2016

For the last week, a large bus with the slogan “Stand with First Nations to protect the Peace River” on its sides has been making its way across Canada.

A federal judge will hear an appeal from two northeastern B.C. First Nations groups in Montreal on Monday about the $8.8 billion dam known as Site C. The Treaty 8 First Nations want construction to stop on the Site C dam site, saying it infringes on their traditional hunting, fishing and trapping rights.  Read the rest of this entry

B.C. Hydro CEO refuses to halt Site C, says Amnesty report wrong

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B.C. Hydro president Jessica McDonald says some First Nations groups approve Site C

The Canadian Press, August 10, 2016

B.C. Hydro president Jessica McDonald says the Crown corporation has reached wide-ranging agreements with some First Nations concerned about the $8.8-billion Site-C hydroelectric dam project in northeastern B.C.

McDonald rejects a recent call to halt work on the project, saying talks and consultations have gone on since 2007 and recent agreements will mitigate potential impacts of the project. Read the rest of this entry

Site C shooting ‘forever’ links Anonymous activist, farmer

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After RCMP officers fatally shot a masked man outside a Site C open house in 2015, the IIO took over the investigation. But they never interviewed a man linked to the shooting. (CBC)

Retired farmer whose Site C protest triggered RCMP shooting never interviewed by investigators

By Betsy Trumpener, CBC News, July 18, 2016

A man linked to the fatal RCMP shooting of a a masked activist with Anonymous was never interviewed by investigators for B.C.’s police watchdog.

“They have never gotten ahold of me. No, never,” Terry Hadland told CBC News one year after officers killed James McIntyre outside an open house for the controversial Site C dam in northeastern B.C. Read the rest of this entry

Unmasked: The face of Anonymous activist shot dead by RCMP

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The first glimpse of the face of the masked Anonymous ‘comrade’ shot dead by RCMP is this yearbook photo of James McIntyre from 1979. (Contributed)

James McIntyre a ‘gentle, innocent’ who loved model trains, concerned by Site C

By Betsy Trumpener, CBC News, July 14, 2016

One year after a masked man linked to Anonymous was shot dead by RCMP in northeastern B.C., a relative wants to reveal the true face of James McIntyre.

McIntyre, 48, was killed on a sidewalk by officers responding to a call about a disturbance at an open house for BC Hydro’s controversial Site C dam project in Dawson Creek on July 16, 2015. Read the rest of this entry

BC Hydro set to sign Site C dam construction contract worth $1.5B

Site C dam mapContract is the largest of the controversial $8.3-billion project

By B.C. Almanac, CBC News, Nov 25, 2015

The controversial Site C construction project is one step closer to reality with BC Hydro choosing consortium Peace River Hydro Partners on Nov. 25 as its preferred partner in a $1.5-billion dollar contract to construct the dam near Fort St. John. Read the rest of this entry

B.C. aboriginal leaders decry government relationship in open letter

BC premier Christy Clark speaking at a liquified natural gas promotional event.

BC premier Christy Clark speaking at a liquified natural gas promotional event.

Chiefs of 10 northern B.C. First Nations say province ignoring concerns over Site C and LNG developments

By Tamsyn Burgmann, The Canadian Press/CBC News, Sept 8, 2015

People once paddled great distances to set up fishing camps on the land where Liz Logan’s family has lived for generations in northern British Columbia.

Now Tsinhia Lake has yellowed, the fish have died and her family must carry in bottled water to drink.

The damage from oil and gas industries has prompted Logan, chief of the Fort Nelson First Nation, to help form an alliance with other aboriginal leaders against the provincial government.

Read the rest of this entry

West Moberly First Nations concerned about mercury contamination in fish

West Moberly First Nation Chief Roland Willson holds a frozen bull trout that he says is contaminated with mercury, in front of the Legislature in Victoria on Monday. (Dirk Meissner/The Canadian Press)

West Moberly First Nation Chief Roland Willson holds a frozen bull trout that he says is contaminated with mercury, in front of the Legislature in Victoria on Monday. (Dirk Meissner/The Canadian Press)

Study by the band concludes 98% of fish have mercury levels above provincial guidelines

By Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press/CBC News, May 12, 2015

Members of the West Moberly First Nations say a hydroelectric dam in northeastern B.C. has left fish in the region too contaminated with mercury to eat.

Chief Roland Willson and members of the McLeod Lake Indian Band, located in northeastern British Columbia, arrived at the legislature in Victoria with more than 90 kilograms of bull trout packed in two coolers.

“Typically, you’d be proud of this fish,” he said. “But we can’t eat this.” Read the rest of this entry