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Highway of Tears internal records deliberately deleted, says B.C.’s privacy commissioner

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Amnesty International investigates murdered and missing indigenous women in B.C.

Every year, people in Fort St John march through the streets and remember missing and murdered loved ones. (Fort St John Sisters in Spirit/Facebook)

Every year, people in Fort St John march through the streets and remember missing and murdered loved ones. (Fort St John Sisters in Spirit/Facebook)

MLA condemns tragedy, says violence not specific to his region or to indigenous women

By Betsy Trumpener, CBC News, Oct 21, 2015

Amnesty International Canada is wrapping up a human rights investigation in northeastern B.C. and the human rights group says it’s alarmed by violence against aboriginal women amidst industrial development in the region.

Investigators just wrapped up a fact finding mission in Fort St. John on Friday. Amnesty women’s rights campaigner Jacqueline Hansen — who is based in Ottawa — has been meeting with as many people as she can. Read the rest of this entry

Hundreds gather in Vancouver for annual vigil honouring missing and murdered Aboriginal women

Police probe possibility lone killer dumping bodies outside small Alberta town

(Clockwise from the top left: Amber Tuccaro, Delores Browers, Katie Ballentyne and Edna Bernard) Graphic: APTN News.

(Clockwise from the top left: Amber Tuccaro, Delores Browers, Katie Ballentyne and Edna Bernard) Graphic: APTN News.

by Brandi Morin, APTN National News,May 1, 2015
The remains of four Indigenous women have been found over the last 13 years within a small rural area near Leduc, Alta. that police suspect could be a lone killer’s dumping ground. Read the rest of this entry

Missing, murdered aboriginal women crisis demands a look at root causes

Roxanne Marie Isadore.

Roxanne Marie Isadore.

New CBC database highlights some patterns behind violence

By Connie Walker, CBC News, April 10, 2015

Roxanne Isadore was already a survivor by the time she reached her sixth birthday.

“She used to scream at night … ‘That guy is after me.'” Her grandmother Angeline recalls how the sexual abuse Roxanne experienced as a child haunted her for years.

As she got older, she continued to struggle. There were suicide attempts, addictions. And when she was 24, she disappeared. Read the rest of this entry

Top Mountie breaks with policy, says Indigenous perpetrators responsible for 70 per cent of solved Indigenous women murders

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson, photo by CBC News.

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson, photo by CBC News.

by Jorge Barrera, APTN National News>, April 9, 2015

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson says Indigenous perpetrators are responsible for 70 per cent of the solved murders of Indigenous women, according to a letter distributed to various media outlets by Status of Women Minister Kellie Leitch’s office.

The letter represents a substantial shift from the RCMP which has previously stated, because of its “bias-free policing policy,” it would not be revealing data on the ethnicity of perpetrators from its project on murdered and missing Indigenous women. Read the rest of this entry

Families of missing and murdered indigenous women give police a failing grade

Missing Murdered Women photosCBC probes 230 unsolved cases, interviews 110 families

CBC News, April 8, 2015

Police departments across Canada get a failing grade for their efforts at solving cases of missing and murdered indigenous women, according to CBC interviews with more than 110 family members.

CBC News has embarked on an exhaustive search for families who have lost a relative either to an unsolved killing or whose loved one still remains missing.

So far, more than 110 families have responded to questions ranging from the efficacy of police investigations to the need for a national inquiry.

Families were asked to rate the quality of the police investigation in each case, on a scale of one to 10, with 10 being excellent. The average rating was 2.8. Read the rest of this entry

Men’s role in solving the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women

CP train blocked in Toronto, March 12, 2014.

CP train blocked in Toronto, March 12, 2014.

Organizers say not enough men showing support

By Ryan Pilon, CBC News, April 7, 2015

Lani Elliott was 21 years old when she survived a vicious attack by her husband, who beat her with a baseball bat and broke her leg.

Elliott is now telling her story to First Nations and in schools, raising awareness of how often domestic abuse plays a role in the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women.

According to a report released by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police last year entitled “Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women: A National Operational Review”, 92 per cent of the women knew their attackers: Read the rest of this entry

A quiet crime wave against Manitoba’s Sayisi Dene women

A photo of Annie Yassie from Manitoba’s Project Disappear database. The 13-year-old girl had just returned home to Churchill, Man., from residential school when she disappeared on June 22, 1974. (RCMP)

A photo of Annie Yassie from Manitoba’s Project Disappear database. The 13-year-old girl had just returned home to Churchill, Man., from residential school when she disappeared on June 22, 1974. (RCMP)

Northern community’s murdered, missing women and girls remain unnoticed

By Donna Carreiro, CBC News, April 7, 2015

It’s been 45 years since Ila Oman was murdered in the Dene Village outside Churchill, Man. But to this day, no one knows who sexually assaulted her. No one knows who physically attacked her. And no one knows which came first.

In fact, few people know Ila Oman even existed, let alone died a brutal death.

“It was like no one really cared. It was like this was almost normal,” recalled Nancy Powderhorn, who was a child at the time of the incident. Read the rest of this entry

Cindy Gladue Case: Rallies Across Canada Seek Justice For Slain Aboriginal Woman