Blog Archives

Highway closures in B.C. raise concerns about local food security during disaster

coquihalla-highway-snow-snowfall-congestion

Coquihalla Highway closed in February 2017 due to heavy snowfall, leaving transport trucks and private vehicles stuck on the highway overnight.

Experts say communities have between 3-5 days of supplies before more needs to be shipped in

By Andrew Kurjata and Ash Kelly, CBC News, Feb 15, 2017

A series of highway closures has highlighted how dependent B.C. communities are on regular shipments of food and supplies and raised questions about what would happen to that supply chain during a prolonged emergency. Read the rest of this entry

A starving wolf stalked a woman and her dog for 12 hours. Then along came a bear.

Joane Barnaby

Joanne Barnaby, left, is reunited with Tammy Caudron after 18 hours in the Canadian bush.

June 17, 2016

Joanne Barnaby was deep in the deadfall, smeared in mosquitoes and blood, dehydrated and near exhaustion, when she heard the call of a mama bear searching for its cub.

Barnaby couldn’t believe her luck.

Twelve hours earlier, she had been picking mushrooms in the remote Canadian wilderness when she had heard a growl behind her. She turned around and saw Joey, her faithful mutt, locked in a snarling standoff with a skinny black wolf. Read the rest of this entry

Missing Pond Inlet man walks safely into Repulse Bay

Brian Koonoo. Photo: CBC News.

Brian Koonoo. Photo: CBC News.

‘I am happy to be alive! Love you all,’ says Brian Koonoo on Facebook after week long ordeal

CBC News, May 20, 2015

Brian Koonoo, a 36-year-old man from Pond Inlet, Nunavut, walked safely into Repulse Bay Wednesday morning after four days of air and ground searches were unable to locate him.

Koonoo, who works for Parks Canada, originally set out on snowmobile from Pond Inlet on May 10. He arrived in Igloolik May 12 and spent the night before heading on to Hall Beach the next day, according to Nunavut RCMP.

He’d already travelled at least 450 kilometres when he left Hall Beach on May 13, en route to Repulse Bay. Read the rest of this entry

PDF: Where There is No Doctor

Where there is no doctor cover 1A PDF of the 2011 version of Where There Is No Doctor 2011 (click the link to download).  This manual is 503 pages.  A hard copy version can also ordered from the publisher.

From the introduction:

This handbook has been written primarily for those who live far from medical centers, in places where there is no doctor.  But even where there are doctors, people can and should take the lead in their own health care. So this book is for everyone who cares. It has been written in the belief that: Read the rest of this entry

“I thought I was going to die.” School girl who was lost on West Coast mountain tells her story

Leanne John, the 15 year old girl who became lost during a school field trip, is flanked by loving and relieved parents Gloria and George John. The spoke to Ha-Shilth-Sa about their ordeal on March 11. Photo by Denise Titian

Leanne John, the 15 year old girl who became lost during a school field trip, is flanked by loving and relieved parents Gloria and George John. The spoke to Ha-Shilth-Sa about their ordeal on March 11. Photo by Denise Titian

By Denise Titian, Ha-Shilth-Sa, March 12, 2015

Ahousaht — Leanne John, 15, was taking part in a school field trip in the rugged and remote Bedwell Valley when she went missing March 3 during a hike up the mountain. The Maaqtusiis school student spent a night alone on the frozen mountainside. This is her story.

A group of about 20 school kids from Ahousaht went to Clayoquot Wilderness Resort in Bedwell Sound. It is the off-season for the resort and the school was using the base camp for their field trip.

Leanne, a Grade 9 student, was part of a group made up of students from grades 8 to 11. They were to spend four days in Bedwell Sound to learn cultural teachings from staff working at Ahousaht’s Holistic Centre. Read the rest of this entry

Land Shark Survival and Stealth Bivy Bag Review

The Land Shark, an emergency bivy and rescue/stealth bag, comes in a small pouch.

The Land Shark, an emergency bivy and rescue/stealth bag, comes in a small pouch.  Photo: Land-Shark.com

Warrior Publications Note:  The manufacturer of this bag claims it defeats FLIR thermal imaging.  It also functions as an emergency survival bivy bag, and has reversible orange and camouflage sides.  The bag retails for around $70.  The following review is from CanadianWildernessSurvival.com.

by Canadian Wilderness Survival, Jan 2, 2015
I found this product on the internet one day while looking up some gear and was instantly intrigued. The Land Shark bivi , or bivy, is a small shelter made for one person that is designed to be an emergency shelter, but it has some neat benefits that no other bivi has!

The Land Shark is made from a 100% waterproof material which looks similar those blue tarps you buy from the hardware store, but is nothing like them The material is more like a rubber that has been sewn in such a way that makes it ripstop, ensuring that if you should get a hole in the bag it’s not going to tear further. This is the main feature of all ripstop materials, the entire product is sewn or fused with small interlocking squares and this prevents any holes from becoming tears under pressure.
Read the rest of this entry

Making a Bushcraft Knife from a Steak Knife and Hockey Stick

Knife Build 1 30by Zig Zag, Warrior Publications, Oct 6, 2014

This is a photo tutorial on making a bushcraft or utility knife from a serrated steak knife with a hockey stick wood handle.  I did it as a step in the process of learning how to make a knife, in this case by stock removal of an already existing knife design and building of a handle with pins.  I was inspired by a common modification made to Old Hickory butcher knives, in which the blade is cut down and reshaped, and a new handle is attached. Read the rest of this entry

Selecting a Knife for Bushcraft and Wilderness Use

Making a feather stick for fire starting.

Making a feather stick for fire starting.

by Zig Zag, Warrior Publications, September 18, 2014

“The knife is the smallest and most portable of all the cutting tools. Light and unobtrusive, the knife is readily available for hundreds of everyday tasks in bush living.”

(Mors Kochanski, Bushcraft, p. 109)

A knife is one of the most important tools for use in a wilderness area, whether for bushcraft or survival. It can be used to cut and carve wood for shelters, stakes, traps, hooks, spears, walking sticks, etc. It can be a vital tool when making a fire, from cutting and splitting wood to making friction fire drills, feather sticks, etc.  A knife is used to clean, skin, and butcher animals or fish, to cut rope or cordage, etc.   A knife can also be used as a weapon for self-defence. Read the rest of this entry

Remove the Dust for our Survival

Image: Blackfire.

Image: Blackfire.

John Kane, Two Row Times, February 25, 2014

I really like the expression, “Remove the Dust.” Its most basic meaning evokes the image of sweeping away the dust accumulated over years of neglect from our wampum belts or any other reminders of our shelved knowledge. We use it as an expression that is generally associated with maintaining our culture. But at some point the line between the survival of our culture, distinction and autonomy and just plain survival will be brushed away like a line drawn in the very dust we seem covered in now. Read the rest of this entry

BOB the Bug Out Bag

by Warrior Publications, Jan 5, 2014

How not to pack your Bob Out Bag; US soldier overburdened with high tech gear and weaponry.

How not to pack your BOB; US soldier overburdened with high tech gear and weaponry.

A Bug Out Bag (BOB) is a pre-packed bag of personal survival items that can be grabbed when you must quickly depart a location during an emergency. The bag must be light enough for you to carry over long distances, yet contain enough items to sustain you for up to at least 72 hours (3 days). The typical weight of such a pack is between 30 to 40 pounds. Once you have assembled the bag, take it out on hikes and camping trips to ensure that it works, that it’s light enough to be carried over rough terrain, and that the items contained in it are both durable and necessary. Read the rest of this entry