Blog Archives

Nexen pipeline spill likely not the last, First Nations group warns

Oil spill from Nexen Energy pipeline in northern Alberta tar sands, July 16, 2015.

Oil spill from Nexen Energy pipeline in northern Alberta tar sands, July 16, 2015.

Alberta oil pipeline cleanup covers area of 2 CFL football fields

CBC News, July 18, 2015

In the wake of a massive pipeline leak in northern Alberta, a First Nations group in the area is worried more spills will happen unless environmental standards are tightened.

“If we continue to accept that these types of incidents are the status quo of development we are also accepting the illegal abrogation of the rights and title of First Nations,” Chief Allan Adam of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation said Saturday. Read the rest of this entry

Nexen pipeline leak in Alberta spills 5 million litres

Nexen Energy's Long Lake facility at Alberta's tar sands.  Photo: CBC News.

Nexen Energy’s Long Lake facility at Alberta’s tar sands. Photo: CBC News.

Nexen Energy spill south of Fort McMurray covers about 16,000 square metres

CBC News, July 16, 2015

One of the largest leaks in Alberta history has spilled about five million litres of emulsion from a Nexen Energy pipeline at the company’s Long Lake oilsands facility south of Fort McMurray.

The leak was discovered Wednesday afternoon.

Nexen said in a statement its emergency response plan has been activated and personnel were onsite. The leak has been stabilized, the company said.

The spill covered an area of about 16,000 square metres, mostly within the pipeline corridor, the company said. Emulsion is a mixture of bitumen, water and sand. Read the rest of this entry

Fort McKay profits from Tar Sands even as land is destroyed

Band office at Fort McKay. photo: APTN

Band office at Fort McKay. photo: APTN

Benefits of oil boom for northern First Nation outweigh the losses caused by industrial development, for now

by Brandi Morin, APTN National News, June 23, 2015

The main road running through Fort McKay looks like it was newly paved and painted.

It is bright and green here, looking fresh and on the brink of summer.

The river flows gently alongside the community as the day comes alive with the sounds of power tools, trucks and other machinery echoing against the backdrops of its forested setting. Read the rest of this entry

Lax Kw’alaams First Nation opposes Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline

The Eagle Spirit Energy company meet with representatives of 30 First Nations over the weekend. (Photo by Eagle Spirit Energy)

The Eagle Spirit Energy company meet with representatives of 30 First Nations over the weekend. (Photo by Eagle Spirit Energy)

Company claims its pipeline has support from 200 representatives of 30 First Nations

CBC News, June 4, 2015

A First Nation in B.C. is contradicting recent claims from Eagle Spirit Energy about its support for a pipeline that would transport crude oil through its territory from Alberta to B.C.’s northwest coast.

Eagle Spirit Energy met with dozens of First Nations communities last weekend. On Tuesday, it announced that 200 representatives from 30 First Nations, including the Lax Kw’alaams, spoke out in support of the company’s proposed pipeline project.

But Lax Kw’alaams Mayor Garry Reece says that’s not entirely correct. Read the rest of this entry

Alberta forest fire forces evacuation of oilsands facilities

Cenovus Energy's Foster Creek plant in northeast Alberta. (Canadian Press/Cenovus )

Cenovus Energy’s Foster Creek plant in northeast Alberta. (Canadian Press/Cenovus )

Cenovus and CNRL shut down operations as precautionary move

CBC News, May 23, 2015

Cenovus Energy and Canadian Natural Resources Limited have evacuated their facilities within the Cold Lake Air Weapons range, close to Alberta’s eastern border, due to an out-of-control forest fire in the area.

“Yesterday, CNRL evacuated their plant facilities in the Primrose area and then, last night at 11 o’clock, we advised Cenovus in Foster Creek that it would be a good precautionary move to evacuate their personnel as well,” said  Leslie Lozinski, spokeswoman for the province’s environmental and resource ministry. Read the rest of this entry

Oilsands producers face harsh reality of rout: There’s no one to save them this time

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Imperial Oil’s Kearl mine needs an average U.S. crude price of about $85 a barrel over its decades-long lifespan to earn a return. Photo: Financial Post.

Jeremy van Loon and Rebecca Penty, Bloomberg News/Financial Post, March 23, 2015

The collapse in the market for Canada’s heavy crude below $30 a barrel last week is hammering home a harsh reality for the nation’s oil-sands producers: There’s no one to save them this time.

Unlike previous market crashes that were relatively short- lived, the combination of persistent oversupplies and weakening demand are dealing a severe setback to what’s been one of the biggest growth stories in global energy markets. Oilsands companies such as Suncor Energy Inc. already have been rethinking major developments that can require more than $10 billion in investment. Now even existing projects are barely covering costs or in a losing position. Read the rest of this entry

Shell pulls plug on long-delayed oil sands mine

Stop the Brutal Slaughter of Wolves in Alberta and B.C.

Fort McMurray braces for impact of oil price drop

A large welcome sign greets traffic travelling north on Alberta highway 63 as it  enters the town at the centre of Canada's oil boom, Fort McMurray.File from 2006.(THE CANADIAN PRESS/Bayne Stanley)

A large welcome sign greets traffic travelling north on Alberta highway 63 as it enters the town at the centre of Canada’s oil boom, Fort McMurray. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Bayne Stanley)

Spectre of coming cutbacks sends a chill over city sometimes called Fort McMoney

By Terry Reith, CBC News, Jan 17, 2015

Fort McMurray, Alta., the city at the heart of the oilsands, is already seeing signs of a slowdown as the price of oil sinks.

The boom town has weathered many a bust, only to recover and continue its frenzied growth. But this time there are projections that the price drop could be deep and sustained. That’s bad news for the oilsands, where the cost of production is higher than for conventional oil. Read the rest of this entry

Shell Canada cutting back oilsands workforce

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