Blog Archives

Clean your water bottle: study finds bacteria in water storage containers

Water-Bottles-1000-x-560APTN National News, August 7, 2017

Researchers studying higher rates of gastrointestinal illness in Inuit communities have a message for all Canadians: wash your water bottles and storage containers.

“People don’t really think about it,” said Sherilee Harper, co-author of the study recently published in the journal “Environmental Science and Pollution Research.” Read the rest of this entry

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Oregon: Nestle Water Battle Continues

itsmyfutureTribal members speak out at City Council meeting

April 18th 2016 (Cascade Locks, Oregon)

Monday April 11th a meeting took place at the Cascade Locks Town Hall and members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs of Oregon arrived on short notice in traditional longhouse dress to fiercely defend the waters of our home, the Columbia River.

The Cascade Locks city council voted against a resolution [6-1] that would have prevented Nestle International Waters from having rights to Oxbow Springs, the headwaters of Herman Creek. The Cascade Locks city council officially endorsed Nestle to open a water bottling facility in the Locks. Read the rest of this entry

Nadleh Whut’en and Stellat’en hereditary leaders proclaim B.C.’s first aboriginal water laws

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March 29, 2016 — George George Sr., whose Nadleh Whut’en hereditary leadership name is Yutunayeh, signs a water policy declaration that covers the traditional territory of his First Nation and that of the Stellat’en. Nadleh Whut’en chief Martin Louie looks on. Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun [PNG Merlin Archive]

By Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun March 30, 2016

The hereditary leaders of two northern B.C. First Nations proclaimed the first traditional aboriginal water laws in the province, which could have implications for industrial development including mining and LNG pipeline projects.

The Nadleh Whut’en and Stellat’en First Nation traditional leaders declared on Wednesday no development would take place on their traditional territories in the Northern Interior unless the water laws were followed.

Read the rest of this entry

Shoal Lake 40 First Nation taking its case to UN

Community elder Grace Redsky from Shoal Lake 40 First Nation performed a water healing ceremony at a man-made channel made to support Winnipeg's water system which has cut them off from the mainland Thursday, June 25, 2015. (John Woods / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Community elder Grace Redsky from Shoal Lake 40 First Nation performed a water healing ceremony at a man-made channel made to support Winnipeg’s water system which has cut them off from the mainland Thursday, June 25, 2015. (John Woods / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

by Chinta Puxley, The Canadian Press/CTV News, October 5, 2015

WINNIPEG — A reserve cut off from the mainland and under a boil-water advisory for almost two decades is taking its case to the United Nations.

Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, which straddles the Manitoba-Ontario boundary, became isolated a century ago during construction of an aqueduct which carries water to Winnipeg. The reserve has no all-weather road and has been without clean water for 17 years. Read the rest of this entry

Oilsands may face severe water shortages, Athabasca River study suggests

The Athabasca River, highway construction and suburbs seen from a helicopter in Fort McMurray, Alta., on July 10, 2012. Water for the oilsands industry comes mainly from northern Alberta's Athabasca River, and oilsands account for 72 per cent of estimated water use from the river. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

The Athabasca River, highway construction and suburbs seen from a helicopter in Fort McMurray, Alta., on July 10, 2012. Water for the oilsands industry comes mainly from northern Alberta’s Athabasca River, and oilsands account for 72 per cent of estimated water use from the river. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

‘The river is much more variable than you would think based on measurements since 1950s’

By Emily Chung, CBC News, Sept 21, 2015

The river that provides water to the oilsands industry is much more prone to multi-year droughts than modern records show, suggesting that the industry’s current level of water use may not be sustainable, a new study suggests.

The oilsands industry needs 3.1 barrels of fresh water to produce a barrel of crude oil from oilsands mining and 0.4 barrels of fresh water to produce a barrel of crude oil from oilsands drilling, according to the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers. Read the rest of this entry

‘The water table is dropping all over the world’: NASA warns we’re on the path to global drought

Sacred Water, Klamath People and the Struggle for Cultural Survival

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Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Wikipedia.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Sacred Water, Klamath People and the Struggle for Cultural Survival

February 25, 2015 (Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon)

Entangled in the heart of an arduous century long battle over water rights in the Upper Klamath Basin, is the struggle of the Klamath, Modoc, Yahooskin Peoples for cultural survivance.

Our elders have always told us that water is life, water is priceless. Our water is so sacred it should never be quantified, compromised or negotiated.
But what happens to the future of a culture, whose spiritual foundation is water, when even to tribal negotiators, the priceless becomes a mere commodity? Read the rest of this entry