Blog Archives

Over 5,000 Women Attend Zapatista’s ‘Women in Struggle’ Summit

Zapatista women gathering 1

Zapatista women soldiers and dancers during a political event in the Guadalupe Tepeyac autonomous community in Chiapas. October 17, 2017. | Photo: raulfernandopl.tumblr.com

Telesur TV, March 8, 2018

The First International Gathering of Politics, Art, Sport, and Culture for Women in Struggle is hosted exclusively by rebel women for rebel women.

Thousands of women from around the world attended a meeting in Zapatista territory Thursday to hold the “First International Gathering of Politics, Art, Sport, and Culture for Women in Struggle,” hosted by women of the National Liberation Zapatista Army in the southeastern mountains of Mexico. Read the rest of this entry

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Mexico’s Zapatista rebels, 24 years on and defiant in mountain strongholds

Zapatista lined up

Members of the Zapatista national liberation army (EZLN) in La Garrucha, Chiapas, stand in front of a mural showing the revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata. Photograph: Eduardo Verdugo/AP

The peasant rebels took up arms in 1994, and now number 300,000 in centres with their own doctors, teachers and currency, but rarely answer questions – until now

by John Vidal, The Guardian,

Diners in the Tierradentro cafe in the southern Mexican town of San Cristóbal de las Casas can choose between a variety of omelettes. The “Liberty” has the most ingredients, the “Democracy” looks the best, but the “Justice” costs the most – possibly because it comes with cheese. Read the rest of this entry

Women’s delegation to International Women’s Gathering in Chiapas

thumbnail_jan20pic“Revolutionary struggles cannot achieve collective liberation for all people without addressing patriarchy, nor can women’s freedom be disentangled from racial, economic, & social justice.” -Victoria Law

The Zapatista women will host the First International Gathering of Politics, Art, Sport, and Culture for Women in Struggle in Chiapas, Mexico from March 7-11, 2018. A delegation of women from all walks of life, racial, social-economic, and cultural backgrounds strongly feel that we could learn much from our Zapatista sisters. Their indigenous perspectives and willingness to decolonize and reshape the political landscape into something that works for all people speaks to us as we look at the challenges we face in the US and Canada. Read the rest of this entry

Zapatista women convoke International Women’s Gathering

Communiqué of the Indigenous Revolutionary Clandestine Committee, General Command of the Zapatista National Liberation Army Read the rest of this entry

Zapatistas Demand Indigenous Unity to Fight Capitalist Slavery

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Top: Juan Popoca / Bottom: Ángeles Torrejón. EZLN guerrillas circa 1994.

by Telesur TV, October 12, 2016

The Zapatistas argued at the 20th anniversary National Indigenous Congress that resource exploitation will ultimately destroy the people.

As the iconic Subcomandante Marcos – also known as Subcomandante Galeano – made a rare appearance, the Zapatistas renewed their call Tuesday for Indigenous unity across Mexico in the face of what the movement criticizes as runaway social and environmental destruction for the benefit of a few, while the people – especially Indigenous communities – suffer the consequences.

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Oso Blanco’s Sentence Could be Reduced!

oso-blancofrom Free Oso Blanco, via Earth First! Newswire, May 17, 2016

[Background: Oso Blanco (Byron Shane Chubbuck) is a wolf clan Cherokee / Choctaw raised in New Mexico. His Cherokee name is Yona Unega and he became known by the authorities as “Robin the Hood” after the FBI and local gang unit APD officers learned from a CI that he was robbing banks to send thousands of dollars worth of supplies to the Zapatista Army of National Liberation in Mexico on a regular basis during 1998 and 1999.] Read the rest of this entry

Report: The First Worldwide Festival of Resistance in Mexico

Celebrating the Global Fight Against Capitalism in Mexico: Where There is Destruction From Above We Will Rebuild From Below

From December 21, 2014 through January 3, 2015 some 2,600 people from 48 countries (2,050 from Mexico and 550 from other countries) gathered for the first Worldwide Festival of Resistances Against Capitalism.

The festival took place all over Mexico and the majority of participants travelled together in a mass caravan of buses (not without mechanical problems and police interference) to the different regions to share and listen stories and strategies of resistance, to strengthen their cultures of resistance, and to build lasting networks locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. Thanks to the excellent organizing by EZLN and CNI the impacts of the festival will reverberate amongst the participants and their resistance communities for years to come. Read the rest of this entry

Zapatista Communities Celebrate 20 Years of Self-Government

Zapatistas march on Dec 21, 2012, in Chiapas.

Zapatistas march on Dec 21, 2012, in Chiapas.

by Laura Carlsen, Yes Magazine, Jan 17, 2014

There are two tests of social change movements: endurance and regeneration. After two decades, Mexico’s Zapatista movement can now say it passed both.

Thousands of Zapatistas turned out this month to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 uprising of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN). At the New Year festivities in the five caracoles, or regional centers of Zapatista autonomous government, veterans and adolescents not yet born at the time of the insurrection danced, flirted, shot off rockets, and celebrated “autonomy”—the ideal of self-government that lies at the heart of the Zapatista experience. Read the rest of this entry

“Practice First, Then Theory:” The Zapatista Little School Shares Lessons Learned During 19 Years of Self-Governance

By Kristin Bricker, CIP Americas, September 5, 2013Zapatista youth fists
The first night of my homestay during the Zapatista Little School, my guardian and her husband asked if their students had any questions.  My classmate and I both had experience working with the Zapatistas, so we politely limited ourselves to the safe questions that are generally acceptable when visiting rebel territory: questions about livestock, crops, local swimming holes, and anything else that doesn’t touch on sensitive information about the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN). Read the rest of this entry