IFAK: Individual First Aid Kits

The newest US Army IFAK; the folding insert containing the items slides into the pouch, which has two flap openings on either side.

The newest US Army IFAK 2; the folding insert (bottom) containing the items slides into the pouch (top), which has two flap openings on either side. The pouch is carried on the rear lower back of the tactical vest.

by Warrior Publications, June 10, 2015

While updating and reorganizing some first aid kits around our house, I did some research on military-issued individual first aid kits (known as “IFAK” in the US military).  These are specialized types of first aid kits and their primary role is to stop severe bleeding wounds, such as those inflicted by bullets or explosions.  While this may not be of great interest to the average civilian, any one who uses firearms on a regular basis (such as hunters) should make note of these kits and their contents, for emergencies such as accidental shootings or discharges of firearms.  I think they should also be of interest to people who live in remote rural or wilderness areas where it can be difficult for medical services to access.  For example, a person could experience a severe bleeding injury while using axes or chainsaws for gathering firewood, etc.  It’s also a good idea to get as much first aid training as you can, and to have a small first aid kit assembled and ready to go in your vehicle, pack, etc.

Field Dressings

In this photo from Oka 1990, the Canadian soldier carries a field dressing on his left shoulder, attached with tape.

In this photo from Oka 1990, the Canadian soldier on the left carries a field dressing on his left shoulder strap, attached with tape.

When I was active in the Canadian Forces reserves many years ago, we weren’t issued first aid kits.  We did receive basic first aid training, but the only piece of medical equipment we were issued was called a “field dressing”, also known as a pressure bandage.  This was a large, thick gauze pad (a dressing) with two ties that extended from it which were used to wrap around the affected body part and secure the pad to the wound.  Like the modern day IFAKs, the field dressing was intended for severe bleeding wounds.  Canadian soldiers carried the field dressing taped on the non-shooting shoulder strap of their web gear (so for a right handed person, the dressing was attached to the left shoulder strap).  The US military also issued a field dressing that was carried in its own small pouch, also on the shoulder strap of their web gear.

A field dressing as issued by the US military until the issuing of IFAKs. The white padded section is applied to the wound, and the wraps on either side (folded like an acordion) are used to tie and hold the dressing in place.

A field dressing as used by the US military until the issuing of IFAKs. The white padded section is applied to the wound, and the wraps on either side (folded like an accordion) are used to tie and hold the dressing in place.

field dressing 4Field dressings can still be purchased today in military surplus stores or through on-line distributors.  A civilian version of a field dressing is the abdominal bandage.  There are also modernized field dressings known as trauma or emergency bandages (see below).  Improvised field dressings can be made using a triangular bandage and gauze dressings, or any clean cloth that is available.

US Army IFAK

The first US Army IFAK, issued in a modified SAW 100 round pouch.

The first US Army IFAK, issued in a modified SAW 100 round pouch.

With the invasion and occupation of Iraq, beginning in 2003, the US military quickly fielded the first Individual First Aid Kit, which was comprised of the following pieces:

  • 1 Tourniquet
  • 1 Elastic bandage kit (this is similar to a field dressing)
  • 1 Bandage GA4-1/2” 100’s
  • 1 Surgical adhesive tape
  • 1 Nasopharyngeal airway kit
  • 4 Surgical gloves
  • 1 Combat gauze dressing

An important feature of this kit is the tourniquet, which has been used for hundreds of years to stop severe bleeding on limbs, but became a questionable technique after World War 2.  Today, tourniquets are credited with saving the lives and limbs of US soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan (I plan on posting another article on tourniquets soon).  Many military forces now issue tourniquets.

The contents of this IFAK were all stuffed inside a modified squad automatic weapon (SAW) 100 round magazine pouch.  Over 900,000 of these kits were eventually issued.  This first version of the IFAK was later replaced by the Improved First Aid Kit (also referred to as an IFAK).

US Marine Corps IFAK

USMC IFAK.

USMC IFAK.

At around the same time as the US Army was issuing its IFAK, the US Marine Corps and US Navy developed and began issuing its own version of an IFAK, and by 2004 it was standard issue to every Marine as part of their basic equipment.  This IFAK was comprised of two modules, a trauma kit and a minor first aid kit, which were carried in a pouch.

The Trauma Kit, issued in a vacuum sealed bag, includes these components:

  • Bandage, Elastic, (2 EA) (field dressings)
  • Bandage, Gauze, (2 Rolls)
  • Tourni-Kwik Tourniquet, One Handed, (1 EA)
  • Wound Pack (QuikClot), Hemostatic Treatment, (1 EA)

    Another view of the USMC IFAK.

    Another view, and a revised version, of the USMC IFAK.

The Minor First Aid Kit includes these components:

  • Bandage, Adhesive ¾” x 3″, (10 EA)
  • Dressing, Burn 4″ x 16″, (1 EA)
  • Povidone-Iodine Topical Solution. USP. 10% 1/2 Fl. Oz. Bt, (1 Bottle)
  • Water Purification Tablet, Iodine 8 mg., (1 Bottle)
  • Triangular Bandages 40″ x 40″ x 56″, (1 EA)
  • Bandage, Adhesive 2″ X 4.5″, (5 EA)

US Army IFAK (Improved First Aid Kit)

The US Army's Improved First Aid Kit (IFAK), showing the pouch and folding insert that contains the items.

The US Army’s Improved First Aid Kit (IFAK), showing the pouch and folding insert that contains the items.

This kit replaced the first US Army IFAK.  It came in a pouch with a folding insert that must be pulled out and is attached to the pouch with a lanyard.  The insert holds the following items:

  • Tourniquet, Combat Application (CAT, Combat Application Tourniquet)
  • Bandage Kit, Elastic
  • Bandage Gauze 4-1/2″ 100/Pkg
  • Adhesive Tape Surg 2″ 6’s Roll
  • Airway, Nasopharyngeal, 28fr, 12s
  • Glove, Patient Exam 100/Pkg (4ea)
  • Pouch, IFAK

Here is an excerpt from a 2006 article promoting the Improved FAK and giving details on some of the components:

The Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT):

Tourniquet CAT 3“The Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) is one of the most valuable life-saving tools in the pouch, said Hayes, who also trains instructors at semi-annual Medical Skills Validation Trainer Training. Hayes advises Soldiers to remove the plastic wrapping from the tourniquet. Removing the plastic allows for quicker access and gives Soldiers the chance to practice slipping on the tourniquet.

“The CAT tourniquet, because it’s so important, should remain outside of the packet so that it’s ready to go,” Hayes said.

“After removing the plastic, make sure to keep the tourniquet inside the pouch because dirt can wear down the Velcro and make it ineffective, said Sgt. Scott Stewart, a CLS instructor at the Jameson Combat Medical Training Center.

“The Nasal Pharyngeal Airway (NPA):

“The NPA replaces the oral pharyngeal, or J-tube. Like the J-tube, the NPA is inserted to keep the airway open. Unlike the J-tube, it is inserted through the nose to avoid triggering the troublesome gag reflex.

“Before inserting the tube, Soldiers must make sure the length of the NPA matches the length from the corner of the casualty’s nose to the bottom tip of the casualty’s ear and that the diameter of the tube is no larger than the casualty’s pinky finger. If surgical lubrication is available, it helps for inserting the tube. The tube should be inserted with the angled hole pointed towards the septum of the nose. The person giving aid should stop inserting the tube if there is resistance.

“Trauma bandage or “Israeli dressing”:

Israeli Bandage 3“The trauma bandage replaces the field dressing found in old first aid pouches. The main purpose of the trauma bandage is to serve as a pressure dressing. It can also be used for a “tourniquet-like effect” to slow blood circulation, though Hayes emphasizes that Soldiers should use a CAT as a first choice if a tourniquet is needed. Unlike the CAT, it must be kept inside the package to keep it clean. Directions on how to use the bandage can be found on the back of the package.

“I think it’s a big improvement from the field dressing,” Stewart said about the trauma bandage.

“The kit also contains a bag of compressed gauze, a role of surgical tape and a standard pair of sanitary gloves.

“Each kit is designed to treat only one Soldier, so it is recommended that Soldiers keep it accessible, especially when going off post, said Spc. Alfrado Varela, a CLS instructor at the Jameson CMTC. Varela recommends that Soldiers keep it attached to their Interceptor Body Armor (IBA) at all times.”

(From “The Improved First Aid Kit — more than a field dressing,” by Spc. Spencer Case, 207th MPAD, Anaconda Times, March 2006)

The Improved IFAK was later replaced by the newer IFAK 2.

US Army IFAK 2

US Army IFAK II.

US Army IFAK II.

The US Army began issuing the Improved First Aid Kit 2 (or II) in early 2014.  It consists of a pouch with two openings on either side, into which an insert is placed.  Like the previous IFAK, the insert is connected to the carry pouch by a lanyard.  The IFAK II is to be worn on the lower back, where US soldiers typically carry less gear, and can be opened with either hand.

IFAK 2 with two tourniquet pouches.

IFAK 2 with two tourniquet pouches.

A closer shot of the IFAK 2 contents.

A closer shot of the IFAK 2 contents.

The IFAK II contains the same contents as the Improved FAK, with the addition of a second tourniquet, a tactical combat casualty card (to note what kind of first aid was applied to a wounded soldier), a mini-Sharpie marker, an eye shield, a rubber seal with a valve for sucking chest wounds, and a strap cutter.

Other Military First Aid Kits

British military first aid kit.

British military first aid kit.

The British military issue a similar medical pouch as the IFAK, with a folding insert carried inside a zippered pouch.  The Canadian military has also begun issuing first aid kits, at this time apparently contained in a medical pouch produced by Tactical Tailor.

British soldier in Afghanistan with a medical pouch located on his lower right side.

British soldier in Afghanistan with a medical pouch located on his lower right side.

The Tactical Tailor medic pouch issued to Canadian soldiers.

The Tactical Tailor medic pouch issued to Canadian soldiers.  It measures 9″ X 6″ X 3″.

Tactical Tailor medic pouch, opened.  The contents are placed inside the zippered mesh pockets.

Tactical Tailor medic pouch, opened. The contents are placed inside the mesh pockets.

Canadian soldier in Afghanistan with a medical pouch located on his lower right side.

Canadian soldier in Afghanistan with a medical pouch located on his lower right side.  In this picture, and of the British soldier above, you can see how large these pouches are.

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Posted on June 10, 2015, in Gear Reviews, Warrior Fieldcraft and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. One injury that I feel is not thought of but should be considered is a sucking chest wound. When building your own IFAK an Asherman Chest seal (or my department uses HALO Seals) should be added preferably 2 for entry and possible exit.

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  2. Pingback: IFAK: Individual First Aid Kits | Warrior Publications | SHTF Prepper

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