Category Archives: Colonization

Healing Continues 125 Years After Wounded Knee Massacre

Wounded Knee chief bigfoot

Chief Big Foot (Spotted Elk) lies lifeless in the snow near Wounded Knee Creek following the Wounded Knee Massacre on December 29, 1890. One hundred and twenty-five years following the Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890, indigenous peoples continue to heal.

Sarah Sunshine Manning, Indian Country Today, Dec 28, 2015

This year marks the 125th anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre. On December 29, 1890, as many as 300 innocent and unarmed Lakota men, women, children, infants, and elders were gunned down by the United States 7th Cavalry at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. After the bloodshed, Chief Big Foot (Spotted Elk) and his band lie dead in the snow where they remained frozen for three days, until all were buried in a mass grave.

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Aboriginal children at residential schools often buried in unmarked graves, report reveals

Residential School class

Native children in a residential school.

by Marlene Leung, CTV News, Dec 15, 2015

Aboriginal children attending residential schools died at a higher rate than school-aged children in the general population, and were often buried in unmarked graves, according to the final report from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The commission released its final report Tuesday afternoon, marking the culmination of six years of research and interviews with more than 6,000 residential school survivors and their families. Read the rest of this entry

Maskwacis rallying in response to ‘suicide crisis’

randy-littlechild

Randy Littlechild, executive director of health services in Maskwacis, says there is hope now that the Alberta government will help fund a crisis line. (CBC)

Alberta child advocate adds voice to concerns about ‘alarming’ suicide rate among aboriginal youth

By Gareth Hampshire, CBC News, Dec 3, 2015

First Nation leaders in Maskwacis say they are pleased there appears to be growing awareness at the provincial level about the shocking number of indigenous youths taking their own lives.

They were responding to a report released Tuesday by Alberta child and youth advocate Del Graff, which said that more than half the deaths or cases of serious injury under investigation by his office this year involved aboriginal youth who attempted or died by suicide. Read the rest of this entry

The pass system: another dark secret in Canadian history

Pass system card 1.pngUnreserved, CBC News, Sunday November 29, 2015

Canadians are becoming increasingly aware of residential schools and their impacts on First Nations people. But many have not yet heard about another system of segregation — one that often kept First Nations confined to their communities.

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Residential school documents to be publicly available for first time

Mi’kmaq resistance kept British holed up in their forts, historian finds

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi'kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

The British had more troops and resources on a global scale, but they underestimated what was needed to take over Nova Scotia in 1675, and remained on the defensive until they made peace with the Mi’kmaq in 1761. This photo of Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia is from around 1890. (CBC News, supplied by Nova Scotia Archives Twitter)

Tod Scott says Halifax founder Edward Cornwallis couldn’t suppress early Mi’kmaq pushback

By Jerry West, CBC News, Oct 22, 2015

In the early clashes between the British and Mi’kmaq, the British usually came out on the losing end, new research suggests.

The Mi’kmaq were so successful at defending against the settlers, British soldiers were often too scared to leave their forts, according to historical documents.

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Strapped, bullied and sexually assaulted at residential school, ex-student testifies

Toby Obed fought back tears as he told the court how staff would make students have sex on field trips and forced others to watch.  CBC News.

Toby Obed fought back tears as he told the court how staff would make students have sex on field trips and forced others to watch. CBC News.

Toby Obed says former students in North West River were scared of staff

by CBC News, Oct 5, 2015

An Inuit man told a St. John’s courtroom Monday that he never felt loved at the Labrador residential school he was forced to attend, and that punishment against Inuit students was very common.

Toby Obed said students at the North West River school were also bullied and taunted but staff did nothing to protect them.

“We were scared of staff. They could do or say anything at anytime,” Obed sobbed as he testified during a class action lawsuit at Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador.  Read the rest of this entry

Aboriginal mom fights for custody of infant twins in dispute with ministry

Nicolette Moore says just hours after giving birth to twins, the Ministry of Children and Family Development said they would be removed from her care. (Facebook)

Nicolette Moore says just hours after giving birth to twins, the Ministry of Children and Family Development said they would be removed from her care. (Facebook)

Nicolette Moore says she’s been clean and sober for 2 years, but the ministry still took her twin babies

CBC, June 19, 2015

An aboriginal woman from the Nisga’a First Nation is fighting to gain custody of her infant children after she says she turned her life around.

The Ministry of Children and Family Development seized custody of Nicolette Moore’s infant twins this month. Moore says the ministry cited concerns about her past addiction.

“I was told future behaviour is predicted by past behaviour. I honestly don’t know where my past ends and my future begins.” Read the rest of this entry

Aboriginal history, culture coming to B.C. schools curriculum

Marines from the Royal Navy destroying a Kwakwaka'wakw village in 1850, from The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book, by Gord Hill.

Marines from the Royal Navy destroying a Kwakwaka’wakw village in 1850, from The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book, by Gord Hill.

‘You can’t have reconciliation unless you understand what the truth behind it is,’ said Peter Fassbender

By All Points West, CBC News, June 19, 2015

It’s meant to be a step towards reconciliation: B.C.’s new education curriculum will include more instruction on aboriginal culture and history.

The province says this is a response to a “call for action” coming out of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission really showed us the urgent need we have to move forward in a very positive way,” said Education Minister Peter Fassbender.  Read the rest of this entry

Sixties Scoop victims demand apology, compensation

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Wayne Snellgrove, centre, with his adoptive family. Snellgrove was one of thousands of aboriginal kids forced from their homes and adopted into mostly non-Native families during the 1960s to 80s. (Submitted by Wayne Snellgrove)

Some estimate more than 20,000 aboriginal kids adopted by mostly non-native families

CBC News, June 18, 2015

Aboriginal adoptees forced from their families by the Canadian government in the Sixties Scoop are expected to receive what is believed to be the first public government apology on Thursday.

Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger is set to deliver the apology, which the province has been working on for months alongside affected adoptees.

The Sixties Scoop is the name given to the period of time between the 1960s and ’80s when thousands of aboriginal children were placed with mostly non-native adoptive families. Read the rest of this entry

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