Blog Archives

Mural: No More Stolen Sisters

No More Missing Sister Isha JulesIsha Jules in Enderby, BC, at the mural painted to raise awareness that there are 3 missing women in the area since last year. The three women went missing within a month & a half of each other.  Caitlin Potts, Ashley Simpson and Deanna Wertz all missing for 12-16 months now.  All from within Splatsin First Nation and Secwepmeculu.

Video: Confrontation at Imperial Metals AGM

Heavy police presence as protesters urge investors to divest from Vancouver mining company

Protesters removed from Imperial Metals’ annual conference

imperialmetals

A dozen RCMP officers have been called to the scene. (FarrahMerali/CBC)

A dozen RCMP officers called to scene

CBC News, May 25, 2017

One person has been arrested, and three others forcibly removed after entering Imperial Metals’ annual conference at the Coquitlam Executive Plaza Hotel.

At least a dozen RCMP officers were called to the scene after a group of protesters gathered outside the hotel and entered one of the conference rooms.  Read the rest of this entry

Fundraising Appeal for the Secwepemc’ulecw Assembly

Secwepemc no kinder morganAll settler comrades, friends and allies,
Elders and women from the Secwepemc nation are hosting a nation-wide
Secwepemc’ulecw Assembly on the land in June. The goals of the Assembly
are to discuss and take action under Secwepemc law against colonial
corporate development impacting Secwepemc’ulecw without Collective
Consent. Read the rest of this entry

Shuswap band carves canoes for 1st time in 60 years

Secwepemc canoe-carvers

Tanner Francois (L) poses with Frank Marchand (R). Marchand, from the Okanagan Indian Band, is helping members of the Little Shuswap Indian Band — including Francois — carve two canoes. (Doug Herbert/CBC)

‘Being able to be taught to do something my ancestors were doing — it’s like I’m following in their footsteps’

CBC News, March 8, 2017

The Little Shuswap Indian Band in B.C.’s Shuswap region is carving canoes for the first time in over 60 years.

The band partnered with the Okanagan Indian Band to relearn canoe-making skills and every day band members have been working on the shores of Little Shuswap Lake at Quaaout Lodge carving out two large canoes. Read the rest of this entry

First Nation-led environmental review panel rejects Ajax mine in Kamloops, B.C.

ajax-mine kamloops

Ajax mine located on outskirts of Kamloops, BC.

Controversial $1.3-billion project has residents divided

By Maryse Zeidler, CBC News, March 4, 2017

The Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwépemc Nation has rejected a proposed open-pit copper and gold mine south-west of Kamloops, B.C., after its months-long review of the project.

The decision could be an important upset for KGHM International, a subsidiary of Polish company KGHM Polska Miedźthat, which has been trying to push the controversial $1.3-billion project forward since 2006.  Read the rest of this entry

Statement from the family of Arthur Manuel on his passing

art1On Wednesday January 11, 2017 at 11:00 PM, Arthur Manuel, our beloved father, grandfather, husband, brother, uncle, warrior, and teacher passed away. Arthur was one of our most determined and outspoken Secwepemc leaders and activists—a pillar in the resistance, known globally for his tireless advocacy for Indigenous Peoples’ right to self-determination. He passed on into the spirit world surrounded by many generations of his loving family. Read the rest of this entry

Indigenous leader, activist, Arthur Manuel dead at 66

arthur-manuel

Arthur Manuel, Secwepemc.

Manuel was former Chief of Neskonlith Indian Band, chair of Shuswap Nation Tribal Council

CBC News January 12, 2017

A widely respected Indigenous leader and activist from the Secwepemc Nation has died. Arthur Manuel was 66-years-old.

The son of the late George Manuel, who founded the National Indian Brotherhood — precursor to the Assembly of First Nations — Arthur Manuel entered the world of Indigenous politics in the 1970s, as president of the Native Youth Association. Read the rest of this entry

Simpcw First Nation marking 100th anniversary of forced relocation

Secwepemc tete-jaune-cache-townsite

An image from 1912 identifies “Shuswap Indians” at Tête Jaunce Cache. (Photo by F.A. Talbot, from the Simpcw First Nation Archive)

Simpcw forced from from Tête Jaune Cache to a reserve in Chu Chua, 300 kilometers away

By Andrew Kurjata, Jenifer Norwell, CBC News, August 12, 2016

The Simpcw First Nation are making a symbolic return to their traditional land in Tête Jaune Cache this weekend — marking 100 years since they were forced to leave.

“The settlers, the miners, in those days had very racist kind of ideas about First Nations people,” said chief Nathan Matthew of the relocation.

“And they just didn’t want First Nations people around there, sort of getting in the way of the settlement of the land or the use of the resources.” Read the rest of this entry