Author Archives: Zig Zag

What’s up with Warrior Publications…

landofheadhunters1As you may have noticed, there’s been a lack of new articles being regularly posted over the past week or so…  I have had to engage in some work and travel, including a speaking event in Olympia, Wa. where I spoke at Evergreen State College (thanks to the Black Cottonwood Collective), and another event in Vancouver, BC at the Native Education College.  I hope to be back and actively posting articles by around April 30 or so…

The FBI Likes Your Water Protectors Post Too: The Do’s and Don’ts

Dakota Access pipeline protest 1Fellow water protectors should think carefully and act responsibly when posting any information about themselves or others – because the authorities are watching

The fight against Dakota Access is not over. Court battles continue, divestment efforts have pulled billions from the company, and resistance all over Turtle Island is ongoing. But while we, water protectors, stand up for the future generations, a massive strategy by state and federal law enforcement seeks to repress and destroy us.

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Tribal Members in Oklahoma Defeat Natural Gas Pipeline Company

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Two Eagle Dancers by Stephen Mopope, Anadarko, Oklahoma Post Office

Federal court orders removal of natural gas pipeline in Oklahoma for trespassing on original Kiowa Indian lands

The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma has ordered a natural gas pipeline operator to cease operations and remove the pipeline located on original Kiowa Indian lands Anadarko.

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Prominent Mi’kmaq Warrior evicted from apartment calls for reform

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Suzanne Patles on Treaty Day in 2016 with her son. Patles received an eviction notice from her landlord in Eskasoni. Photo: Trina Roache/APTN

by Trina Roach, APTN National News, April 7, 2017

An eviction notice for a well-known Mi’kmaq warrior has her raising questions around housing security for people who rent apartments on reserve.

Suzanne Patles, a key figure in the 2013 fracking protests near Elsipogtog, NB, is a band member of the Eskasoni First Nation in Nova Scotia. She’s lived in the same apartment there for over 11 years, along with her partner and three sons. Read the rest of this entry

RCMP defends use of secretive cellphone surveillance technology for the first time

how-an-imsi-catcher-works

An IMSI catcher pretends to be a cellphone tower to attract nearby cell signals. When it does, it can intercept the unique ID number associated with your phone, the International Mobile Subscriber Identity, or IMSI. That number can then be used to track your phone. (CBC)

Unprecedented briefing with reporters comes in wake of CBC investigation into illegal spying in Ottawa

By Dave Seglins, Matthew Braga, Catherine Cullen, CBC News, April 5, 2017

The RCMP for the first time is publicly confirming it uses cellphone surveillance devices in investigations across Canada — but at the same time says the potential of unauthorized snooping in Ottawa, as reported by CBC News, poses a threat to national security. Read the rest of this entry

B.C. government signs LNG benefit agreements with northwestern Kitselas First Nation

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Kitselas First Nation Chief Joe Bevan (right) speaks at the announcement of a benefits agreement with the province backing LNG development in exchange for up to $13 million in funding and a 1,277 land grant. Pacific NorthWest LNG chief operating officer Wan Badrul Hisham is in the background. The event was Thursday, March 30, 2017 at the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. Derrick Penner / Postmedia News

by Derrick Penner, Vancouver Sun, March 30, 2017

The Kitselas First Nation on British Columbia’s north coast, on Thursday, signed benefit agreements with the province worth up to $13 million and a 1,227-hectares land grant in exchange for backing liquefied-natural-gas export projects in the region. Read the rest of this entry

Canada 150 is a celebration of Indigenous genocide

The Scream (2017) converted

The Scream, on the cover, The Subjugation of Truth, by Kent Monkman.

This year, the federal government plans to spend half a billion dollars on events marking Canada’s 150th anniversary, prompting a great deal of debate about its historical treatment of Indigenous peoples. The majority of Canadians don’t have all the facts about that, while First Nations continue to live the crisis-level effects of that legacy. Perhaps Canada should cancel its celebrations and undertake the hard work necessary to make amends.

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Heiltsuk First Nation village among oldest in North America: Archeologists

Heiltsuk triquet-island

Triquet Island at low tide. Photo: North Sound Sea Kayaking Association.

by Randy Shore, Vancouver Sun, March 28, 2017

A Heiltsuk village site on B.C.’s mid-coast is three times as old as the Great Pyramid at Giza and among the oldest human settlements in North America, according to researchers at the Hakai Institute.

The excavation on Triquet Island has already produced extremely rare artifacts, including a wooden projectile-launching device called an atlatl, compound fish hooks and a hand drill used for lighting fires, said Alisha Gauvreau, a PhD student at the University of Victoria.  Read the rest of this entry

Renowned B.C. Indigenous artist Beau Dick has died

Beau Dick regalia

Kwakwaka’wakw artist Beau Dick in traditional regalia.

‘Namgis artist was known for his mask carvings and as an advocate for Aboriginal rights

By Megan Thomas, CBC News, March 28, 2017

World-renowned B.C. Indigenous artist Beau Dick has died.

Dick was a master carver and hereditary chief from the ‘Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay, just off the coast of northern Vancouver Island.

He was known for his mask carvings and as an advocate for Aboriginal rights. Read the rest of this entry

Sinixt First Nation not extinct after all, BC court rules

 

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Richard Desautel (middle) stands outside Nelson courthouse on Monday with members of the Colville Confederated Tribes after his acquittal. (Bob Keating/CBC).

Judge rules the Sinixt have not lost their connection to a huge swath of southern B.C.

 

By Adrian Nieoczym, CBC News, March 27, 2017

A First Nation declared extinct by the federal government 60 years ago has won a court battle to have its existence recognized.

A provincial court judge in Nelson, B.C., acquitted a Sinixt man from Washington state on Monday of hunting without a licence and hunting without being a resident. Richard Desautel had been charged after killing an elk near Castlegar in 2010. Read the rest of this entry