Blog Archives

Why Wear a Mask 101

Non-violence Training Teaches White Paternalism at Camp Standing Rock

Kanasatake

Armed warriors at Kanesatake during the 1990 “Oka Crisis.” / Gazette John Mahoney (CTY)

by Wrong Kind of Green, September 16, 2016

What the white man seeks to destroy and what the non-profit industrial complex is financed to carry out: the destruction of the Indigenous Warrior culture. This is not news to native people, however, this reality is all but lost on today’s white “left”. [Further reading: Part II of an Investigative Report into Tar Sands Action & the Paralysis of a Movement, September 19, 2011]

The following comment is from a film director who just returned from the camp at Standing Rock. What she witnessed is the historical paternalism that is reminiscent of the ‘Indian schools’ where proper comportment was wholly identified as the ability to assimilate into Anglo structures. We thank this person for recognizing and  sharing what she witnessed. That this took place on native land – shows egotism and white paternalism still very much exists, is being taught/modeled (via NGO “training”/*NVDA dogma), has no bounds – and no shame. (*non-violent direct action) Read the rest of this entry

“Native 9/11” – Inquiry demanded into siege at Gustafsen Lake

flora_samson_and_kanahus_0

Flora Samson, Ts’peten Defender, with granddaughter Kanahus. Photo: Vancouver Media Coop.

21 years later, Canada evades the legal, jurisdictional issues they tried to kill along with Secwepemc leaders.

by Kerry Coast, Vancouver Media Coop, September 15, 2016

Over a hundred people gathered during the afternoon of September 11, 2016, to remember what happened at Ts’peten (“Gustafsen Lake”) on that date in 1995. On that date, more than a dozen Secwepemc sovereigntists were trapped inside a barricade of 400 Royal Canadian Mounted Police – cut off from roads, radio and satellite phone – at the site of their recent Sundance. A formal inquiry has been demanded ever since. Read the rest of this entry

Mapuche Resistance Group, Weichan Auka Mapu, Claims more than 30 Sabotage Attacks

Philippines: Anniversary of Battle of Mactan

Filipino battle of Mactan 1

Battle of Mactan mural in Cebu, Fort San Pedro painting, Philippines;  scene depicts the leader of the Mactan warriors, Lapu-Lapu killing Magellan, commander of the Spanish forces.

On this day in 1521 Indigenous peoples on the island of Mactan in present-day Philippines defeated a heavily armed Spanish force and killed their commander, Magellan.  This was the first Spanish attempt at colonizing what would eventually become the Philippines. Read the rest of this entry

Peru: Indigenous Seize 11 Oil Wells Demanding Spill Clean Up

The Achuar indigenous people are fed up with the pollution left behind by foreign oil companies. Photo: Reuters

The Achuar indigenous people are fed up with the pollution left behind by foreign oil companies. Photo: Reuters

by Telesurv.TV, sept 2, 2015

The Achuar communities say foreign oil companies pollute their lands and their clean water. They demand compensation and clean up of oil spills.

Peruvian indigenous protesters seized oil wells in an Amazonian oil block Tuesday to press the government to respond to demands for compensation due to the pollution caused by the petroleum operations.

The protesters from the Achuar indigenous communities said they also plan to halt output in a nearby concession. Read the rest of this entry

Understanding Diversity Of Tactics & Why It Should Not Be Dismissed

The 1990 Oka Crisis is a good example of a diversity of tactics being used.

The 1990 Oka Crisis is a good example of a diversity of tactics being used.

by Caretaker, Aug 4, 2015

So here’s the thing – we humans are different throughout the world. Our point of view in life, our culture, our political ideology, our religion, our governance structure, our interaction with other human beings, our understanding of life, our treatment of the planet & people, our way of living is all based on personal experiences of being alive. Everyone’s life is based on context. There’s no denying that.  But here’s the tough shit that some people do deny; staying alive. Read the rest of this entry

Behind the lines: Invisible scars left by Oka Crisis 25 years later

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. The Canadian Press/Ryan Remiorz

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. The Canadian Press/Ryan Remiorz

Mohawk journalist Dan David reflects on his time during Oka Summer

By Dan David, CBC News, July 11, 2015

At 5 a.m. on the morning of July 11, I’ll be with traditional people and a few guests in The Pines on Kanehsatà:ke Mohawk Territory. There won’t be any government people, politicians, or members of the band council.

No long speeches, preening egos, or empty promises allowed. Just a few people who wish to reflect on the meanings of events that began on a day exactly 25 years before. Read the rest of this entry

Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance

by National Film Board of Canada, uploaded to Youtube on Sept 20, 2011
Directed by Alanis Obomsawin – 1993

On a July 11, 1990, a confrontation propelled Native issues in Kanehsatake and the village of Oka, Quebec, into the international spotlight. Director Alanis Obomsawin spent 78 nerve-wracking days and nights filming the armed stand-off between the Mohawks, the Quebec police and the Canadian army. This powerful documentary takes you right into the action of an age-old Aboriginal struggle. The result is a portrait of the people behind the barricades.

Read the rest of this entry

Revisiting the Pines: Oka’s legacy

Warriors at Oka, 1990; the 78-day armed standoff at Kanesatake, Mohawk territory, continues to haunt government and corporations in their dealings with Indigenous peoples.

Warriors at Oka, 1990; the 78-day armed standoff at Kanesatake, Mohawk territory, continues to haunt government and corporations in their dealings with Indigenous peoples.

by Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette, July 10, 2015

KANESATAKE — Behind the barricade at the entrance to the Pines, Denise David tossed and turned, dreaming of a deadly melée between unknown foes.

Her nightmare was about to come true.

It was the morning of July 11, 1990, a day that would rudely awaken Canadians to the anger simmering in First Nations communities. Read the rest of this entry