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Secret deal between Canada’s spies and border guards raises concerns

C-51, controversial anti-terrorism bill, is now law. So, what changes?

Ts'Peten siege, 1995; near the town of 100 Mile House, BC, over 450 heavily armed RCMP equipped with armoured personnel carriers from the Canadian military laid siege to a Secwepemc sundance camp.  During the year long trial in 1997, it was revealed that the RCMP had engaged in a self-proclaimed "smear and disinformation" campaign, had opened fire on unarmed individuals and detonated an explosive device under a truck used by defenders in an agreed upon no-shooting zone.

Ts’Peten siege, 1995; near the town of 100 Mile House, BC, over 450 heavily armed RCMP equipped with armoured personnel carriers from the Canadian military laid siege to a Secwepemc sundance camp. In the year long trial that resulted, it was revealed that police had fabricated shooting incidents, released misinformation about who was in the camp, and had attempted to shoot and kill unarmed people in agreed upon no shooting zones. 

Here are 5 differences you may notice now the anti-terror legislation has royal assent

By Haydn Watters, CBC News, June 18, 2015

Bill C-51, the Conservatives’ anti-terror legislation, received royal assent Thursday afternoon and is now law.

The bill has faced intense scrutiny for the expanded powers it gives the police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

Opponents argue the bill’s wording is too vague, which could lead to dangerous and unlawful measures. Read the rest of this entry

Bill C-51 Anti-Terrorism Act passes in House of Commons

Bill C 51 graphicPassed third reading by a margin of 183 to 96

The Canadian Press/CBC News, May 6, 2015

The federal government’s controversial new anti-terrorism bill has won the approval of the House of Commons.

The Anti-Terrorism Act, also known as Bill C-51, easily passed third reading by a margin of 183 to 96, thanks to the Conservative government’s majority and the promised support of the third-party Liberals.

The legislation gives the Canadian Security Intelligence Service more power to thwart suspected terrorist plots — not just gather information about them. Read the rest of this entry

Spies, lies and the myth of ‘oversight’ at CSIS

Aboriginal Affairs shared wide range of information with spy agency to bolster Idle No More surveillance: documents

Idle No More rally in Ottawa, Dec 21, 2012.

Idle No More rally in Ottawa, Dec 21, 2012.

The federal Aboriginal Affairs department shared information with Canada’s spies and other federal law enforcement agencies to bolster surveillance of the Idle No More movement, internal government documents show.

The documents, obtained under the Access to Information Act, also reveal how easily Canadian authorities assume the possibility of violence when it comes to monitoring First Nation demonstrations.

The Harper government’s proposed anti-terror bill, Bill C-51, would make it easier for federal departments and agencies to share information on widely-defined national security grounds. Read the rest of this entry

Feds put protest activity under microscope in compiling national ‘risk forecast’

Drum group at Sarnia CN rail blockade, Dec 23.

Drum group at Sarnia CN rail blockade, Dec 23, 2012.

‘In a true democracy, protest and dissent should be celebrated, not investigated': Paul Champ

The Canadian Press/CBC News, March 18, 2015

Use of social media, the spread of “citizen journalism,” and the involvement of young people are among the key trends highlighted by a federal analysis of protest activity in Canada over the last half-decade.

A growing geographic reach and an apparent increase in protests that target infrastructure such as rail lines are also boosting the impact of demonstrations, says the Government Operations Centre analysis, obtained under the Access to Information Act. Read the rest of this entry

CSIS helped government prepare for expected Northern Gateway protests

Logo of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).

Logo of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).

Release comes amid heightened concern over new powers proposed in anti-terror bill

By Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press/CBC News, March 17, 2015

Canada’s spy agency helped senior federal officials figure out how to deal with protests expected last summer in response to resource and energy development issues — including a pivotal decision on the Northern Gateway pipeline.

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service prepared advice and briefing material for two June meetings of the deputy ministers’ committee on resources and energy, documents obtained under the Access to Information Act show.

The issue was driven by violence during demonstrations against natural-gas fracking in New Brunswick the previous summer and the government’s interest in “assuming a proactive approach” in 2014, says a newly declassified memo from Tom Venner, CSIS assistant director for policy and strategic partnerships. Read the rest of this entry

Anti-Oil Activists Named as National Security Threats Respond to Leaked RCMP Report

Protest against Enbridge's proposed Line 9, in Toronto.

Protest against Enbridge’s proposed Line 9, in Toronto.

By Michael Toledano, Vice.com, Feb 17, 2015

As the Harper government’s Bill C-51 moves to extend anti-terrorism legislation to include anyone who interferes with the “critical infrastructure,” “territorial integrity,” or “economic and financial stability of Canada,” a leaked report from the RCMP’s Critical Infrastructure Intelligence Team demonstrates how aboriginals and environmentalists are already being targeted by law enforcement for these reasons.

Read the rest of this entry

‘Anti-petroleum’ movement a growing security threat to Canada, RCMP say

CSIS is about to become more ‘kinetic.’ Bad idea

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